metacognition a fancy word for a powerful concept in learning n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Metacognition: A Fancy Word for a Powerful Concept in Learning PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Metacognition: A Fancy Word for a Powerful Concept in Learning

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 20

Metacognition: A Fancy Word for a Powerful Concept in Learning - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 98 Views
  • Uploaded on

Metacognition: A Fancy Word for a Powerful Concept in Learning. Henry O. Patterson, Ph.D . RATO December 8, 2010. 4 Major Questions…. Did you become a better or worse learner the longer you stayed in school? Why?

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Metacognition: A Fancy Word for a Powerful Concept in Learning' - coy


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
metacognition a fancy word for a powerful concept in learning

Metacognition: A Fancy Word for a Powerful Concept in Learning

Henry O. Patterson, Ph.D.

RATO

December 8, 2010

4 major questions
4 Major Questions…
  • Did you become a better or worse learner the longer you stayed in school? Why?
  • How often do you reflect on the strategies you use to learn & the assumptions you make about learning (i.e., how aware are your of your own metacognition & epistemology)?
4 major questions1
4 Major Questions…
  • As a trainer, teacher, mentor, coach, how often do you reflect on the learning strategies & assumptions of those you teach/train?
    • How often do you discuss strategies & assumptions with those you teach/train?
    • How often do you think about how your own strategies & assumptions might differ from those you teach/train?
4 major questions2
4 Major Questions…
  • How does your awareness of your own & your students’ learningstrategies & assumptions impact on how you…
    • design learning experiences?
    • conduct classes & sessions?
    • interact with learners?

#

goals
Goals
  • Encourage youto reflect on your ownmetacognitions & epistemologies;
  • Help you explore how your learning strategies & assumptions differ from others—especially your students/trainees, & how these differences impact on teaching/training/learning;
  • Take away new, useful strategies for helping your students/trainees develop more effective learning strategies & more helpful epistemologies;
  • Have a stimulating & enjoyable morning.

#

overview
Overview
  • Metacognition—the Missing Element in Learning
  • Exploring Our Own Metacognition
  • 7 Effective Learning/Study Strategies
  • Epistemological Beliefs
  • The Intentional Learner
  • Why Learners Don’t Always Use Effective Strategies
  • Promoting Effective Metacognition & Learning Strategies
  • Conclusions
i metacognition the missing element in learning
I. Metacognition—the Missing Element in Learning
  • Most learning situations focus on the content to be learned—knowledge, skills, attitudes, not on the process used to learn
  • Process rarely taught in school; few learners develop high level of metacognition & self-regulation of learning
    • “How to Study” courses sometimes offered
    • Rarely do teachers/trainers discuss how information could be learned
    • Often few role models
i metacognition the missing element in learning con t
I. Metacognition—the Missing Element in Learning (con’t)
  • One major reason for ignoring metacognition is that learning theory has been based mostly on animal research (i.e. rats); what humans believe about learning & their efforts at controlling the process ignored
  • Recent learning theory is focusing on humans’ awareness of their own learning
i metacognition the missing element in learning con t1
I. Metacognition—the Missing Element in Learning (con’t)
  • Metacognition – knowledge of our own learning & memory processes & regulation of those processes, i.e., “thinking about thinking”
    • May be mostly implicit
    • Can—and should--be taught
  • Plays significant role in the effectiveness of adult learning

#

ii exploring our own metacognition
II. Exploring Our Own Metacognition
  • Self-regulation of learning includes…
    • Goal setting
    • Planning
    • Self-motivation
    • Attention control
    • Application of learning strategies
    • Self-monitoring
    • Appropriate help seeking
    • Self-evaluation
    • Self-reflection
ii exploring our own metacognition1
II. Exploring Our Own Metacognition
  • Take the Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI)
  • Score own inventory
  • Discuss results & reactions in small groups
  • Groups report major issues discussed

#

iii 7 effective learning study strategies
III.7Effective Learning/Study Strategies
  • Meaningful learning & elaboration
  • Organization, e.g.,
    • Internal
    • Outline
    • Graphic representation
    • Concept map
  • Note taking
    • Facilitates encoding by adding visual
iii some effective learning study strategies con t
III.Some Effective Learning/Study Strategies (con’t)
  • Identifying important information
    • Notice signals from presenter/text
    • Underlining & highlighting
  • Summarizing (not always easy)
  • Comprehension monitoring – checking to see if info understood & remembered
    • Illusion of knowing – falsely believing that info is known, so stop studying prematurely
    • Use self-questioning & self-assessment
iii some effective learning study strategies con t1
III.SomeEffective Learning/Study Strategies (con’t)
  • Mnemonics
    • Verbal mediation, e.g., principal is a “pal”
    • Visual imagery, e.g.,
      • Loci
      • Pegword
    • Superimpose meaningful structure , e.g., sentence, story, rhyme, acronym (HOMES), acrostic (A-C-E-G: all cows eat grass)

#

iv epistemological beliefs
IV. Epistemological Beliefs
  • Beliefs about knowledge & learning, e.g.,
    • Certainty of knowledge (absolute vs. dynamic)
    • Simplicity & structure of knowledge (isolated vs interrelated)
    • Source of knowledge (self vs. others)
    • Criteria for determining truth (expert vs. logic)
    • Speed of learning (quick vs. gradual)
    • Nature of learning ability (innate vs. learned)
iv epistemological beliefs con t
IV. Epistemological Beliefs (con’t)
  • Developmental & cultural differences in epistemological beliefs (e.g., Asians view mastery as slow & requires persistence)
  • Effects of epistemological beliefs—determines how we study & learn
  • Questionnaire & interview with Bill…
  • Group discussion of implications of different beliefs (see handout)

#

v the intentional learner
V. The Intentional Learner
  • Most effective, ideal learner is actively & consciously engaged in cognitive & metacognitive activities directed specifically at thinking about & learning info (vs. behavioral view)

#

vi why learners don t always use effective strategies
VI. Why Learners Don’t Always Use Effective Strategies
  • Uninformed & misinformed about effective strategies – not taught in school
  • Epistemological beliefs lead to poor strategies
  • Belief that existing strategies already effective
  • Assignments often involve low-level skills
  • Belief sophisticated strategies require too much effort
  • Incompatible goals, e.g., grades
  • Low self-efficacy

#

vii promoting metacognition effective learning strategies
VII. Promoting Metacognition & Effective Learning Strategies
  • Self-regulation training programs at any age or level are effective
  • Discussion of handout: 13 Guidelines for Promoting Effective Learning Strategies…

#

viii conclusions
VIII. Conclusions
  • Effective learning based on metacognition & self-regulated learning
  • Learners’ epistemological beliefs often preclude their being intentional learners, so they use poor study strategies & limit storage & retrieval capabilities
  • Students at any level can be taught appropriate epistemological beliefs, & metacognitive, self-regulation, effective study strategies
  • It’s never too late to learn to learn!!

###