mst for child abuse and neglect what do we know and where are we headed
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
MST for Child Abuse and Neglect: What Do We Know And Where Are We Headed?

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 22

MST for Child Abuse and Neglect: What Do We Know And Where Are We Headed? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 158 Views
  • Uploaded on

MST for Child Abuse and Neglect: What Do We Know And Where Are We Headed?. Cynthia Cupit Swenson, Ph.D. Medical University of South Carolina. MST for Child Abuse and Neglect The Evidence: Study #1-- Standard MST. Brunk, Henggeler, & Whelan, 1987 First Randomized Trial (N = 43)

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'MST for Child Abuse and Neglect: What Do We Know And Where Are We Headed?' - cordell


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
mst for child abuse and neglect what do we know and where are we headed

MST for Child Abuse and Neglect:What Do We Know And Where Are We Headed?

Cynthia Cupit Swenson, Ph.D.

Medical University of South Carolina

mst for child abuse and neglect the evidence study 1 standard mst
MST for Child Abuse and Neglect The Evidence: Study #1-- Standard MST
  • Brunk, Henggeler, & Whelan, 1987
  • First Randomized Trial (N = 43)
  • Multisystemic Therapy vs. Parent Training
  • Children were abused or neglected
  • Mean age 9.8 for youth in MST Condition

6.8 for youth in the Parent Training Condition

MST Greater Alleviation of Family Difficulties

Greater Control of Child

Neglectful Parents More Responsive

PT Greater decrease in parent social problems

slide3
Community-Based Treatment for Child Physical Abuse: Costs and Outcomes Study #2—Standard MST with Adaptations

NIMH-Funded R01 (2000-Present)

Principal Investigator: Cynthia Cupit Swenson,Ph.D.

Co-Investigators: Scott W. Henggeler, Ph.D.

Richard Faldowski, Ph.D.

David Ward, Ph.D.

Project Coordinator: Lisa Saldana, Ph.D.

community based treatment for child physical abuse costs and outcomes
Community-Based Treatment for Child Physical Abuse: Costs and Outcomes

PEACE, Betta Fuh Fambly(Project Empowering Adults, Children, & Their Ecology)

  • Funded by National Institute on Mental Health
  • 5 Year Project
  • Adolescents 10-17
  • Physical Abuse Referrals from Charleston County CPS
peace betta fuh fambly project empowering adults children their ecology
PEACE, Betta Fuh Fambly(Project Empowering Adults, Children, & Their Ecology)
  • Effectiveness Study
  • Site-Charleston/Dorchester Mental Health Services For Children, Adolescents, and Their Families
  • N = 86 Families
  • Random Assignment
  • 2 groups-MST with Adaptations versus Parent Training Group Plus Standard Community Services
peace betta fuh fambly project empowering adults children their ecology6
PEACE, Betta Fuh Fambly(Project Empowering Adults, Children, & Their Ecology)
  • 5 Assessments -Intake, 2 month, 4 month, 10 month, 16 month
  • Outcomes
    • Child Level
    • Parent Level
    • Family Level
    • Service Utilization (Monthly Interview)
    • Cost
demographics
Demographics

Average Age (years) 13.8

Gender Female = 56%

Ethnicity:

Black 59

White 19

Hispanic 6

Native American 1

Arab American 1

short term outcomes
Short-Term Outcomes

Recruitment & Retention

Study Recruitment Rate: 97%

Treatment Retention Rates:

MST: 98% Parent Group: 86%

Research Retention Rates:

4 Month: 100% 16 Month: 95%

short term outcomes9
Short-Term Outcomes

Both Groups Showed

Dramatic Reductions in:

Parent to Child Physical Violence

Parent to Child Psychological Aggression

child report of discipline
Child Report of Discipline

Use of Non-Physical Discipline

MST > PG, p < .01

satisfaction with services
Satisfaction with Services
  • MST Parents Reported Greater Satisfaction with Services:
  • Services Were Worthwhile to the Family p < .01
  • Services Helped the Family p < .05
  • Services Changed the Way the Family Behaves p < .01
  • Skills Learned Became a Part of Daily Life p < .01
  • Treatment Matched the Individual Needs

of the Family p < .01

summary
Summary

Though Youth and Parents in Both Groups Got Better

In the Short Term

MST Youth Were More Likely to:

  • Be Home with the Family
  • Feel Safe
  • Experience less Depression & Anhedonia
  • Report that their Parent was Using more Non Physical Discipline Strategies

MST Parents Were More Likely to:

  • Have Their Child Home with the Family
  • Have Their Child Report that the Parent was using more Non Physical Discipline
  • Be Happy with Treatment and Feel it is Helping The Family Change and That Skills Learned are Becoming Part of Daily Life
  • Report that their child’s symptoms of anxiety and distractibility are reduced
mst for child abuse and neglect
MST for Child Abuse and Neglect

How is it Different From

Standard MST?

mst can
MST-CAN

Population

Abused and Neglected Children

Ages 6-17

Caseload

Maximum 4 Families

Greater Focus on Adult Treatment

Treat Entire Family

Treatment Length

6-8 Months

risk factors related to child maltreatment
Risk Factors Related to Child Maltreatment

PARENT

Depression

Substance Abuse

Low Empathy

Poor Impulse/Anger Control

Antisocial Behavior

Poor Knowledge of Child Development

Negative Perception of Child

History of Maltreatment as a Child

Age and Gender

CHILD

Aggression

Noncompliance

Difficult Temperament

Age

Delayed Development

Gender

Chronic Medical Prob.

History of Abuse

Child

Abuse &

Neglect

Community

Economic Disadvantage

Instability

Neighborhood Burden

Low Community Activities

FAMILY

Marital Status-Single

Limited Resources

Family Stress/Poverty

Family Violence

mst can21
MST-CAN

Key Systems Involved

Child Protective Services

Family Court

MST Adaptations

An Addition of Empirically-Supported Components to What is Considered Standard MST to Address Problems Commonly Found in CAN Families

mst can adaptations
MST-CAN Adaptations
  • Family Safety Plan
  • Functional Analysis of the Use of Force or Physical Discipline
  • Treatment for Anger Management
  • Treatment for PTSD
  • Treatment for Substance Abuse
  • Family Communication Training
  • Clarification of the Abuse
  • Inclusion of a Psychiatrist
  • Involving CPS in Treatment
ad