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Creating an Even Safer and More Equitable Environment: . classrooms fields/courts hallways locker rooms vehicles dining hall advisory other?. Why now? Has something happened ?. Occasional language of exclusion. A good reminder.

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creating an even safer and more equitable environment
Creating an Even Safer and More Equitable Environment:
  • classrooms
  • fields/courts
  • hallways
  • locker rooms
  • vehicles
  • dining hall
  • advisory
  • other?
why now has something happened
Why now? Has something happened?
  • Occasional language of exclusion.
  • A good reminder.
  • Recent survey data: 94% self-identified heterosexuals.
  • Refresher re being inclusive of our invisible minority.
low risk actions
Low Risk Actions
  • Change your assumption that everyone is heterosexual unless they tell you otherwise.
  • Use inclusive language that implicitly allows for GLBTQ possibilities, e.g....
rather than wife or husband
rather than "wife" or "husband"
  • spouse, partner or significant other
some risk
Some Risk
  • Challenge homophobic/disrespectful language and name calling.
    • Name it explicitly. "That's a putdown and that will not fly in my classroom. It's disrespectful and disparages gay and lesbian people."
    • There are no "innocent" bystanders.
  • Put up GLBTQ posters, buttons, pictures, signs
    • Have one or more "distinguishing characteristics"
  • If you are heterosexual, dont' be too quick to inform others of your heterosexuality.
    • Ask what they might think if you told them you were gay or lesbian.
greater risk
Greater Risk
  • Use language that explicitly allows for GLBTQ possibilities (e.g. "Emily Dickinson and her boy/girl friend.")
  • Invite gay/lesbian speakers to your classroom/dorm meeting.
  • Be clear about your willingness to support GLBTQ people.
  • If you are GLBT, come out.
slide11
"Why?"
  • Handbook, p. 2:
  • "Asheville School provides a safe and healthyenvironment for its students in pursuit of its mission."
key findings of the 2009 national school climate survey include
Key Findings of the 2009 National School Climate Survey include:

84.6% of LGBT students reported being verbally harassed, 40.1% reported being physically harassed and 18.8% reported being physically assaulted at school in the past year because of their sexual orientation.

72.4% heard homophobic remarks, such as "faggot" or "dyke," frequently or often at school. Nearly two-thirds (61.1%) of students reported that they felt unsafe in school because of their sexual orientation, and more than a third (39.9%) felt unsafe because of their gender expression.

29.1% of LGBT students missed a class at least once and 30.0% missed at least one day of school in the past monthbecause of safety concerns, compared to only 8.0% and 6.7%, respectively, of a national sample of secondary school students.

The reported grade point average of students who were more frequently harassed because of their sexual orientation or gender expression was almost half a grade lower than for students who were less often harassed (2.7 vs. 3.1).

Increased levels of victimization were related to increased levels of depression and anxiety and decreased levels of self-esteem.