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How People Learn. Conclusion 1: Henri Poincaré. “We must, for example, use language, and our language is necessarily steeped in preconceived ideas. Only they are unconscious preconceived ideas, which are a thousand times the most dangerous of all.”.

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Conclusion 1 henri poincar
Conclusion 1:Henri Poincaré

“We must, for example, use language, and our language is necessarily steeped in preconceived ideas. Only they are unconscious preconceived ideas, which are a thousand times the most dangerous of all.”


How people learn

“Birds,” said the frog mysteriously. “Birds!” And he told the fish about the birds, who had wings, and two legs, and many many colors.


How people learn

“Cows,” said the frog. “Cows! They have four legs, horns, eat grass and carry pink bags of milk.”


How people learn

“And people,” said the frog. “Men, women, children!” And he talked and talked until it was dark in the pond.


How people learn

Conclusion 2: Expert vs. Novice Learners And he talked and talked until it was dark in the pond.

Conclusion 3: Metacognition or reflection


How people learn

Ch1-1 Physics and the Laws of Nature And he talked and talked until it was dark in the pond.


How physics works
How Physics Works And he talked and talked until it was dark in the pond.

Model / Theory

Observation / Experiment


How people learn

Ch1-2 Units of Length Mass and Time And he talked and talked until it was dark in the pond.Standards


How people learn

Ch1-2 Standards of Length Mass and Time Standards And he talked and talked until it was dark in the pond.

M

A Force acts on a mass resulting in motion.

L,T


How people learn

Ch1-2 Standards of Length Mass and Time Typical Lengths And he talked and talked until it was dark in the pond.


How people learn

Scales And he talked and talked until it was dark in the pond.


Ch1 2 standards of length mass and time typical masses
Ch1-2 Standards of Length Mass and Time Typical Masses And he talked and talked until it was dark in the pond.


Ch1 2 standards of length mass and time typical times
Ch1-2 Standards of Length Mass and Time Typical Times And he talked and talked until it was dark in the pond.


How people learn

Ch1-2 Standards of Length Mass and Time Common Prefixes And he talked and talked until it was dark in the pond.


How people learn

Concept Question 1.1 And he talked and talked until it was dark in the pond.

  • (2.44 x 10-5) / (2 x 103) =

  • 2.44 x 10-8

  • 2.44 x 10-2

  • 1.22 x 10-8

  • 1.22 x 102

  • 1.22 x 108



How people learn

Ch1-3 Dimensional Analysis Common Physical Quantities

Concept Question 1.2

Given the following definitions with their dimensions:

v = velocity (L/T)

a = acceleration (L/T2)

t = time (T)

Which of the following equations could be correct as far as dimensions are concerned?

  • v = at2/2

  • v = a/2t

  • v = at

  • v = a2t/2

  • v = a/t2


How people learn

Ch1-3 Dimensional Analysis Common Physical Quantities

How does v depend on a and x?

P1.5 (p. 14) Suppose v2 = 2axp

What is p?


How people learn

Ch1-4 Significant Figures Common Physical Quantities

Concept Question 1.3

  • Which statement is correct regarding significant figures?

  • 1.355 + 1.2 = 2.555

  • 1.478 – 1.3 = 0.18

  • 1.513 / 1.5 = 1.009

  • 1.5 x 10-3 + 0.1 = 0.1015

  • 0.1513 x 1.5 = 0.23


How people learn

Ch1-4 Significant Figures Common Physical Quantities

Do P1.12 (p. 14)

P = 2l + 2 w


How people learn

Ch1-4 Significant Figures Common Physical Quantities

Round-off: If next digit is  5, then round up.

Scientific Notation: Covered previously.


How people learn

Ch1-5 Conversion of Units Common Physical Quantities

Concept Question 1.4

  • How many seconds in a 50 minute class period?

  • 1000

  • 50

  • 3 x 10-3

  • 4500

  • 3 x 103


How people learn

Ch1-5 Conversion of Units Common Physical Quantities

Do P1.24 (p. 15)


How people learn

Ch1-6 Order-of-Magnitude Calculations Common Physical Quantities

CT1.5 A. 500 B. 5,000 C. 50,000 D. 500,000


How people learn

Shea Stadium holds about 55,000. Common Physical Quantities


How people learn

Who is in 0.1 s of Donovan? Common Physical Quantities A. 2,3,4,5 B. 2,3,4 C. 2,3 D. 2

4

3

5

1

2

CT1.6 Donovan Bailey – Canada – 1996 Olympics


How people learn

Donavan is roughly 2 meters tall and that gives the scale. Since they covered 100 m in 10 seconds, each meter takes about 0.1 seconds. The answer is c because they are within roughly 1 meter (half Donovan’s height).


How people learn

Estimate how many barbers in Chicago? Since they covered 100 m in 10 seconds, each meter takes about 0.1 seconds. The answer is c because they are within roughly 1 meter (half Donovan’s height).


How people learn

I started by assuming a typical person gets a haircut every two months. Next I assumed that a barber could give about 4 haircuts/hr or 20/day or 100/week or 400/month or 800/every two months. I rounded this off to about 500/every two months since there may be times when the barber doesn't have customers. So a barber could take care of about 500 customers and then they would all come back again. There are about 3 million people in Chicago proper and 8 million in the metropolitan area so I picked an average of 5 million to represent Chicago. That means about 5x106 / 500 or 104 or 10,000 barbers. This is just an estimate and may be off by a factor of 10 either way given all the questionable assumptions!


How people learn

A Google search listed 1711 barbers around Chicago. two months. Next I assumed that a barber could give about 4 haircuts/hr or 20/day or 100/week or 400/month or 800/every two months. I rounded this off to about 500/every two months since there may be times when the barber doesn't have customers. So a barber could take care of about 500 customers and then they would all come back again. There are about 3 million people in Chicago proper and 8 million in the metropolitan area so I picked an average of 5 million to represent Chicago. That means about 5x10


Ch1 7 scalars and vectors
Ch1-7 Scalars and Vectors two months. Next I assumed that a barber could give about 4 haircuts/hr or 20/day or 100/week or 400/month or 800/every two months. I rounded this off to about 500/every two months since there may be times when the barber doesn't have customers. So a barber could take care of about 500 customers and then they would all come back again. There are about 3 million people in Chicago proper and 8 million in the metropolitan area so I picked an average of 5 million to represent Chicago. That means about 5x10

  • A scalar is a pure number. What are some examples?

  • A vector has magnitude (value) and direction. What are some examples?

  • The magnitude of a vector could be considered a scalar.


Ch1 8 problem solving
Ch1-8 Problem Solving two months. Next I assumed that a barber could give about 4 haircuts/hr or 20/day or 100/week or 400/month or 800/every two months. I rounded this off to about 500/every two months since there may be times when the barber doesn't have customers. So a barber could take care of about 500 customers and then they would all come back again. There are about 3 million people in Chicago proper and 8 million in the metropolitan area so I picked an average of 5 million to represent Chicago. That means about 5x10

  • Read the problem carefully.

  • Sketch the system.

  • Visualize the physical process.

  • Strategize.

  • Identify appropriate equations.

  • Solve the equations.

  • Check your answer.

  • Explore limits and special cases.


Ch1 8 problem solving1
Ch1-8 Problem Solving two months. Next I assumed that a barber could give about 4 haircuts/hr or 20/day or 100/week or 400/month or 800/every two months. I rounded this off to about 500/every two months since there may be times when the barber doesn't have customers. So a barber could take care of about 500 customers and then they would all come back again. There are about 3 million people in Chicago proper and 8 million in the metropolitan area so I picked an average of 5 million to represent Chicago. That means about 5x10

Do P1.39 (p. 16) N = number of beats

B = beats/second T = time


Mechanics
Mechanics two months. Next I assumed that a barber could give about 4 haircuts/hr or 20/day or 100/week or 400/month or 800/every two months. I rounded this off to about 500/every two months since there may be times when the barber doesn't have customers. So a barber could take care of about 500 customers and then they would all come back again. There are about 3 million people in Chicago proper and 8 million in the metropolitan area so I picked an average of 5 million to represent Chicago. That means about 5x10

Study of forces and energy and motion.

  • Force is an agent of change.

  • Energy is a measure of change.