science curriculum planning and resource package n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Science Curriculum Planning and Resource Package PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Science Curriculum Planning and Resource Package

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 35

Science Curriculum Planning and Resource Package - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 121 Views
  • Uploaded on

Science Curriculum Planning and Resource Package. Barb, Randee, Alissa and Amanda. Time Frame. Grade Six; Our Solar System Time: 8-10 weeks, 150 minutes a week. Content.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Science Curriculum Planning and Resource Package' - colum


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
time frame
Time Frame
  • Grade Six; Our Solar System
  • Time: 8-10 weeks, 150 minutes a week
content
Content
  • Earth and space science brings local, global, and universal perspectives to student knowledge. Earth, our home planet, exhibits form, structure, and patterns of change as do our surrounding solar system and the physical universe beyond.
  • Students will be expected to research and represent the physical characteristics of the major components of the solar system, including the sun, planets, moons, asteroids, and comets.
  • In addition, students will assess how effective various methods of representing and interpreting astronomical phenomena, including phases, eclipses, and seasons.
  • Finally, students will evaluate past, current, and possible future contributions of space exploration programs, including space probes and human spaceflight, which support living and working in the inner solar system.
scope and sequence
Scope and Sequence
  • Following the order of the outcomes, this being the same order of the “Pearson Saskatchewan Science 6” text book, we suggest spending two to three weeks on each outcome.
  • This would follow the order of:
  • Outcome SS6.1 - Research and represent the physical characteristics of the major components of the solar system, including the sun, planets, moons, asteroids, and comets.
  • Outcome SS6.2- Assess the efficacy of various methods of representing and interpreting astronomical phenomena, including phases, eclipses, and seasons.
  • Outcome SS6.3 - Evaluate past, current, and possible future contributions of space exploration programs including space probes and human spaceflight, which support living and working in the inner solar system.
extension opportunities
Extension Opportunities
  • The following are resources students can use as extension opportunities to further their understanding of the outcomes in the solar system unit.

Resources for Extension Opportunities

  • Websites
  • Books

Videos

  • http://videos.howstuffworks.com/science/space-exploration-videos.htm1
  • http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html2
  • http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=space+exploration&search_type=&aq=f3

Engagement Resources for Extension Opportunities

  • Moon Clock4
  • Brain Pop5
  • Astro Bingo6
extension opportunities1
Extension Opportunities

Engagement Activities

  • Outcome 1 - Research and represent the physical characteristics of the major components of the solar system, including the sun, planets, moons, asteroids, and comets.
  • Indicator e. Use star charts and astronomy guides to investigate the night sky, including constellations, and record observations using notes in point form, data tables, simple diagrams, and/or charts.
  • Indicator f. Describe objects in the heavens, as indicated through First Nations and Métis art and stories or by Elders or traditional knowledge keepers.
    • Star wheel7
    • Galaxy sort8
    • Star Lab Observations 9
  • Outcome 2 – Assess the efficacy of various methods of representing and interpreting astronomical phenomena, including phases, eclipses, and seasons.
  •  E. Demonstrate how Earth’s rotation causes the day and night cycle and how Earth’s 23.5° tilt and revolution around the sun causes the yearly cycle of seasons.
    •  A Reason for the Season 10
    •  The Sun and the Earth 11
  • H. Model the relative positions of the sun, Earth, and moon to demonstrate moon phases and lunar and solar eclipses.
  • I. Propose questions related to astronomical phenomena to investigate using models and simulations, such as “Do other planets exhibit phases?”, “How would seasons on Earth differ if Earth were not tilted?”, “How would patterns of eclipses change if the sun, Earth, or moon were different diameters or positioned at different locations?”.
    • Moon Phases and Eclipses 12
cross curricula opportunities
Cross Curricula Opportunities
  • Arts Ed/Science
  • Arts Ed - CP6.11 Investigate and use various visual art forms, images, and art making processes to express ideas about identity. (d) Identify and create visual patterns.
  • Science - SS6.1 Research and represent the physical characteristics of the major components of the solar system, including the sun, planets, moons, asteroids and comets. (c) Construct a timeline of Canadian and world wide research efforts related to understand the major components of the solar system.
  • Assessment of: Students will create a timeline that illustrates their understanding of Canadian and national research efforts related to the understanding of the major components of the solar system. The timeline must include specific First Nation and/or Métis contributions of space progression and the major components of the solar system.
cross curricula opportunities1
Cross Curricula Opportunities

Cross curricular opportunities exist almost anywhere a teacher takes the time to find them. Since there is an element of unknown in studying the solar system, this unit lends itself particularly well to Language Arts and Arts Ed.

  • Language Arts/Science
  • ELA - CC6.4-Create and present a variety of representations that communicate ideas and information to inform or persuade and to entertain an audience, including illustrations, diagrams, posters, displays, and cartoons.
  • Science - SS6.2-Assess the efficacy of various methods of representing and interpreting astronomical phenomena, including phases, eclipses, and seasons.
  • Assessment of: Students will create a visual aide that models the relative positions of the sun, earth, and moon. This will demonstrate moon phases and lunar and solar eclipses.
  • Lunar Phase Simulator 13
cross curricula opportunities2
Cross Curricula Opportunities
  • Language Arts/Science
  • CC6.7 Write to describe a place; to narrate an incident from own experience in a multi-paragraph composition and in a friendly letter; to explain and inform in multi-step directions and a short report explaining a problem and providing a solution; and, to persuade to support a view point or stand.
  • SS6.3 Assess the efficacy of various methods of representing and interpreting astronomical phenomena, including phases, eclipses, and seasons.
  • Assessment of: Students will write a science fiction story using authentic characteristics of space exploration and travel. In addition, they will create imaginative characters and/or context. What they have learned in ELA about writing in correct story format will apply to the final assessment of the project.
sample learning cycle comets
Sample Learning Cycle: Comets

Engage Explore

-KWL chart -Science notebook

Evaluate Explain -presentation -make a model comet

Elaborate

-Pair problem solving

assessment and evaluation of outcome 1
Assessment and Evaluation Of Outcome 1
  • Outcome SS6.1 - Research and represent the physical characteristics of the major components of the solar system, including the sun, planets, moons, asteroids, and comets.
  • Assessment for: Students will participate in a model scale activity using toilet paper. Students will demonstrate their progress and understanding through creating a visual aide after engaging in the activity. They will be assessed on their developed knowledge during the activity and after the creation of the visual aide.
    • Toilet Paper Activity 14
  • Assessment as: Students will read the instructions and construct model scales of the planets and the solar system. Students will then reflect in their journals on their learning as they engaged in the activity.
    • Worlds in Comparison 15
  • Assessment of: Students will create a timeline that illustrates their understanding of Canadian and national research efforts related to the understanding of the major components of the solar system. The timeline must include specific First Nation and/or Métis contributions of space progression and the major components of the solar system.
    • Time Line 16
    • Rubric17
assessment and evaluation of outcome 2
Assessment and Evaluation of Outcome 2
  • Outcome SS6.2- Assess the efficacy of various methods of representing and interpreting astronomical phenomena, including phases, eclipses, and seasons.
  • Assessment for: Students will complete worksheets that will build off of each other and show progression of their learning throughout the unit.
  • Assessment as: Students will represent their understanding of astronomical phenomena through music, dance, drama and visual art or stories. They will then create a reflective journal.
  • Assessment of: Students will create and present a visual aid that will model the relative positions of the sun, earth, and moon. This model will also demonstrate moon phases and lunar and solar eclipses. Students will present their visual aid in one of the following methods: music, dance, drama, visual art or stories.
assessment and evaluation of outcome 3
Assessment and Evaluation of Outcome 3
  • Outcome SS6.3 - Evaluate past, current, and possible future contributions of space exploration programs including space probes and human spaceflight, which support living and working in the inner solar system
  • Assessment for: Students will be assessed on their creation of a portfolio of in class work including; worksheets, drawings and other artefacts that will be done throughout the section.
  • Assessment as: Students will create a journal reflecting on the work they have handed in and include descriptive feedback on their individual work.
  • Assessment of: Students will write a science fiction story using their authentic characteristics of space exploration and travel. In addition, they will create imaginative characters and/or context. What they have learned about writing in correct story format, will apply to the final assessment of the project.
engage
Engage
  • Concept Mapping
  • Discussion
  • Demonstration
  • Questionnaires
  • Discrepant Events
  • KWL chart
  • Circle of Knowledge
  • Brainstorming
  • Video18
explore
Explore
  • Movement – as used in the toilet paper solar system
  • Fish Bowl - a panel of students creates a discussion, while the others listen and form ideas from what they hear 19
  • Simulation -
  • Guided Design – students self teach, and then work together to solve a problem
  • Tech Lessons – using an online simulator, etc.
  • Experimentation – making a comet activity
  • Field Observations – ex. record the night sky
  • Focused Imaging
explain
Explain
  • Interview
  • Role Play – ex. Pretend you are an asteroid; how might you behave?
  • Peer Teaching
  • One Minute Paper – students have one minute to explain their knowledge about a topic 20
elaborate
Elaborate
  • Case Study
  • Real World Problem
  • Drama
  • Model Building; How to make a comet21
evaluate
Evaluate
  • Interview
  • Benchmarks
  • Presentation
  • Project
  • Exemplars
what is classroom management
What Is Classroom Management?
  • It is effective discipline
  • It is being prepared for class
  • It is motivating your students
  • It is providing a safe, comfortable learning environment
  • It is building your students self esteem
  • It is being creative and imaginative in daily lessons
  • It is different for everyone and every subject
things to consider for classroom and lab management
Things to Consider for Classroom and Lab Management
  • Transition vs. Allocate Time
  • Allocate Time; the time periods you intend for your students to be engaged in learning activities
  • Transition Time; the time period that exist between times allocated for learning activities
  • Example
    • Getting students assembled and attentive
    • Assigning the task and direction
room lab arrangement
Room/Lab Arrangement
  • Room and Lab arrangement is very important in the management of the classroom and lab
  • Things to consider
    • Make sure all students can see and hear clearly (also, make sure you can see and hear all students clearly)
    • Assign the arrangement according to the learning activity
    • Allow room and easy access for proximity control
    • Think through the class procedures and learning activities and arrange the classroom/lab in the best way possible
safety procedures
Safety Procedures
  • Safety is the most important factor to classroom management. Safety considerations can be addressed to students in several different ways. Safety activities should be considered when addressing safety procedures for the classroom and lab.
types of safety procedures
Types Of Safety Procedures
  • Middle school students are generally exposed to a number of different science labs, including chemistry, biology, physical science, and earth science. Each lab has unique considerations for safety based on the type of equipment that it uses and the types of experiments students will perform. Basic safety concepts that activities should cover include:
  • Proper lab behaviour
  • Equipment use and storage
  • Protective clothing, including goggles
  • Emergency procedures
  • Location and use of emergency equipment
  • With each new classroom students use for lab experiments, safety procedures should be reviewed and updated to minimize any risk of accident or injury.
  • http://safety.lovetoknow.com/Middle_School_Lab_Safety_Activities
ideas for middle years lab safety activities
Ideas for Middle Years Lab Safety Activities
  • Most science teachers introduce students to the lab setting very early in the school year, typically on the first day, and that is when the bulk of safety procedures are discussed. Unfortunately, students may not use the lab facilities frequently and may forget critical safety requirements, and new students who transfer into the class at a later date may never be involved in those initial safety discussions. By reviewing and periodically reinforcing procedures with middle school lab safety activities, teachers can ensure that students are aware of the proper behaviour and techniques to use in the lab.
  • Activities to emphasize lab safety may include:
  • Safety Contracts: Teachers can create a “lab safety contract” that spells out expectations, rules, and disciplinary consequences. Having students initial each point of the contract and sign the document is a way to require them to read the entire contract so they are aware of safety concerns. It is also beneficial to have parents sign the contract so they are aware of the types of situations their child may be involved in and what is expected of them while working in the lab.
  • Safety Drills: Teachers can arrange mock safety drills to allow students to practice emergency procedures in a safe, controlled environment. A chemical spill can be simulated with colored water, a false fire drill could be arranged, or students can practice first aid techniques with a partner, for example.
  • Grades: Safety procedures could be automatically tied to a student’s classroom grade, and any unsafe behaviour could result in lower scores on that day’s activities. Similarly, students who demonstrate excellent safety behaviour may be eligible for extra points.
  • Videos: Teachers can show videos of both safe and unsafe lab procedures, stopping the video periodically to discuss proper safety techniques in their specific lab. For the best effect, videos should be used as interactive tools, with students pointing out both weaknesses and strengths of what is illustrated.
  • Skits: For a lab safety assignment, students could create a short skit about a safety technique or emergency procedure. The skit could then be acted out in front of classmates to share the concept, or it could be shared with younger students as an instructional tool
  • http://safety.lovetoknow.com/Middle_School_Lab_Safety_Activities
when to use safety activities
When To Use Safety Activities
  • The best lab safety activities are those that help instruct students in proper procedures at any time they are needed. Most teachers will cover lab safety at the beginning of the year, but safety lessons should also be included:
  • As reviews before new lab experiments
  • Whenever a new student joins the class
  • As daily reminders for safe activities
  • Whenever a safety violation is found
  • http://safety.lovetoknow.com/Middle_School_Lab_Safety_Activities
additional safety activities
Additional Safety Activities
  • In addition to planned safety activities, safety-conscious teachers will do several other things in their lab classrooms to help reinforce safety concepts and proper behaviour, such as:
  • Model proper equipment use, including safety clothing
  • Post safety procedures and rules in the lab
  • Remind students of safety procedures on every assignment sheet
  • Include safety and emergency questions with every test and quiz
  • Place safety and hazard symbols on lab cupboards and equipment
  • Restrict the number of students in the lab and isolate lab tasks to minimize risks
  • Middle school lab safety activities are only one facet of a safe and efficient classroom. Teachers who take advantage of activities, guidelines, posters, reviews, and other tools to ensure safety are helping students learn in an effective and minimal risk environment. Lab experiments can be powerful learning experiences, and by performing them safely, students aren’t learning the wrong things.
  • http://safety.lovetoknow.com/Middle_School_Lab_Safety_Activities
try this
TRY THIS!
  • Safety Scenario Game22
  • This game is interactive for students and provides safety procedure and learning of safety.
additional resources
Additional Resources
  • People

Dean Elliott - Saskatchewan Science Consultant

Martin Beech and Gary Diver – Professors of Astronomy, University of Regina

Prairie Meteorite Search Group – University of Regina

  • Places

University of Regina Astronomy Lab

Saskatchewan Science Centre

Regina Public Library

  • Packages

Star Lab – Regina Public Schools

  • Web Resources

Natural Resources Canada – Canada Centre for Remote Sensing

additional resources1
Additional Resources

Books

  • Fiction TitlesFlight of the Space Quester, by John Bianchi Benjamin McFadden and the Robot Babysitter, by Timothy Bush Call Me Ahnighito, by Pam Conrad Here Come the Aliens! by Colin McNaughton Here in Space, by David MilgrimRoaring Rockets, by Tony Mitton and Ant Parker Captain Invincible and the Space Shapes, by Stuart Murphy Alistair and the Alien Invasion, by Marilyn Sadler Zenon: Girl of the 21st Century, by Marilyn Sadler Martian Rock, by Carol Diggory Shields Vacationers From Outer Space, by Edward ValfreArchitect of the Moon, by Tim Wynne-Jones A Trip to Mars, by Ruth Young Jed and the Space Bandits, by Jean and Claudio Marzollo Space Guys! by Martha Weston Non-fiction TitlesSpace, by Bobbie Kalman and Niki Walker Postcards From Pluto: A Tour of the Solar System, by Loreen Leedy The Planets, by Gail Gibbons Shooting Stars, by Franklyn M. Branley The Sun, Our Nearest Star, by Franklyn M. Branley Space Vehicles, by Anne Rockwell and David Brion The International Space Station, by Franklyn M. Branley Living on a Space Shuttle, by Carmen Bredeson One Giant Leap: The Story of Neil Armstrong, by Don Brown Getting Ready for Space, by Carmen Bredeson Better Homes and Gardens Outer Space: Fun Projects for Kids To DoCareers in Outer Space: New Business Opportunities by Edward Willett
references
References

1 How Stuff Works (2009). Space Explorations Videos. Retrieved November 13, 2009 from How Stuff Works website: http://videos.howstuffworks.com/science/space-exploration-videos.htm

2 Wilson, J. (Ed.). NASA Video Gallery. Retrieved November 12, 2009 from NASA website: http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html

3 YouTube. Search option. Retrieved November 12, 2009. http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=space+exploration&search_type=&aq=f

4 Lowell Observatory Moon Clock. (n.d.). TRS Schools. Retrieved November 20, 2009 from http://www.trschools.com/staff/g/cgirtain/WS/MoonClock.pdf

5 Brain Pop. (n.d.). Retrieved November 20, 2009 from http://www.brainpop.com/science/space

6 Astro Bingo. (n.d.). Retrieved November 20, 2009 from Astronomy Lesson Plans website: http://www.sciencespot.net/Pages/classastro.html

7 Star Wheel. (2002). Astronomy in your Hands. Retrieved November 20, 2009 from Astronomy in your Hands website: http://www.astronomyinyourhands.com/activities/makestarwheel.html

8 Astronomical Society of the Pacific. (2009). The Universe At Your Fingertips Activity: Galaxy Sorting. Retrieved November 21, 2009 from Astronomical Society of the Pacific website: http://www.astrosociety.org/education/astro/act5/gal_sort.html

9 Sky Observation Project. Middle School Science. Retrieved November 20, 2009 from Middle School Science website: http://www.middleschoolscience.com/skyobservations.htm

10 National Geographic Xpeditions. (2008). Reason for the Season. Retrieved November 20, 2009 from National Geographic Xpeditions website: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/activities/07/season.html

11 National Geographic Xpeditions. (2008). The Sun and the Earth. Retrieved November 22, 2009 from National Geographic website: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/07/g35/seasons.html

references1
References

12 Moon phases and eclipses. (n.d.). Retrieved November 21, 2009 from http://cosmictimes.gsfc.nasa.gov/1919/lessons/eclipse.pdf.

13 Lunar Phase Simulator. (n.d.). Retrieved November 22, 2009 from http://astro.unl.edu/naap/lps/animations/lps.swf

14 Miles, K and Peters, C. II. (2001). Toilet Paper Solar System. Retrieved November 20, 2009 from http://starryskies.com/try_this/tiolet.paper.html

15 Schatz, D. (2006). Worlds in Comparison. Retrieved November 10, 2009 from Astronomy From the Ground Up website: http://mintaka.sdsu.edu/projectastro/resources/WorldsInComparison.pdf

16 Timeline activity. Lunar and Planetary Institute. Retrieved November 20, 2009, from the Lunar and Planetary Institute website: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/timeline/activity/

17 Timeline Rubric. (2004). Retrieved November 22, 2009, from the Read Write Think website: http://www.readwritethink.org/lesson_images/lesson398/rubric-timeline2.pdf

18 Ashatur. (2007). Our Solar System –Size of Planets and Stars to Scale. Retrieved November 11, 2009 fromhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BS88G5WBcfQ&feature=PlayList&p=B6E89B4DEACFD1DB&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=19

19 Texas Collaborative for Teaching Excellence. Active Learning Strategies – Fish Bowl. Retrieved November 11, 2009 from http://cord.org/txcollabnursing/online_fishbowl.htm

Fish Bowl Activity. Awareness Activities. Retrieved November 20, 2009. from http://www.edchange.org/multicultural/activities/fishbowl.htmlor http://www.ion.uillinois.edu/resources/otai/Fishbowl.asp

20 One Minute Paper. Classroom Assessment Techniques. Retrieved November 20, 2009 from http://www.csupomona.edu/~biology/teaching_bytes/one-minute-paper.pdf

references2
References

21 Schatz, D. (1985). Making a Comet in the Classroom. Retrieved November 20, 2009 from National Optical Astronomy Observatory website: http://www.noao.edu/education/crecipe.html

22 Krech, M. (2009). Safety Game. Retrieved November 20, 2009 from http://mjksciteachingideas.com/pdf/SafetyGame.pdf