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Module 3 CIWP Planning: An Overview

Module 3 CIWP Planning: An Overview

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Module 3 CIWP Planning: An Overview

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  1. Module 3CIWP Planning: An Overview 3/19/2012 Office of Local School Council Relations

  2. Objectives • Understand the purpose of the Continuous Improvement Work Plan (CIWP) • Understand the importance of collaboration in school planning • Understand the components of the CIWPand be able to critique & monitor the CIWP & Budget Office of Local School Council Relations

  3. CIWP • Continuous Improvement Work Plan (CIWP): • A two-year plan for improvement that focuses on 3-5 strategic priorities and implementation milestones • Designed to be easily monitored and updated throughout the year • Developed by a CIWP Team and stakeholders and approved by the Local School Council • Is not comprehensive of every budget line or activity the school will complete Office of Local School Council Relations

  4. Purpose of the CIWP The CIWP is a school’s strategic plan, which. . . • Assesses the school’s level of implementation on research based effective practices • Identifies 3-5 specific strategies for improvement reflective of district priorities and the school’s Theory of Action • Defines a realistic, attainable action plan around each priority that is able to be monitored and updated regularly Office of Local School Council Relations

  5. Legal Requirements • The Illinois School Code requires each Illinois public school to develop a plan, called the school improvement plan, to improve the quality of the education provided by the school. • The plan must include: • Results of State Tests • Measurable goals • Professional development activities • Analysis of school performance Office of Local School Council Relations

  6. Annual Process Office of Local School Council Relations

  7. Spring 2012 Timeline 5/23-5/31 Schools submit CIWP & Budget to networks; network approves CIWP & Budget 3/14 Launch CIWP tool for schools Schools complete CIWP May March April June 3/14 – 3/29 School Training on CIWP Beginning 4/26– Schools trained on budgeting tool, complete budget 6/27 Board Approval for probation schools for CIWP & Budget Prior to May 23, schools present budget and CIWP to LSC for approval, if applicable Office of Local School Council Relations

  8. CIWP Process Schools should take the following steps in completing the CIWP: • Develop the CIWP team, including principal, LSC members, parents, and teachers. • Set SY2013 and SY2014 Goalsfor scorecard and state metrics. • Complete/update the school's self-evaluation within the School Effectiveness Framework using any available scorecard, performance, and/or survey data. • Revisit the school’s Mission Statement and update as necessary. Office of Local School Council Relations

  9. CIWP Process (cont.) • Determine 3 to 5 Strategic Priorities on which the school will focus. If applicable, revisit the school’s key levers in the Theory of Action to identify priority areas • Complete an Action Planconsisting of implementation milestones for each strategic priority. • Complete any required “Related Plans”. • Obtain LSC and Network approval of the Budget and CIWP, as necessary. Office of Local School Council Relations

  10. The Principal’s Role • Develops the Plan – establishes and Chairs the CIWP Team • Consults with the LSC, School Staff, Parents, & Community on the Plan • Submits the Plan to the LSC for approval (LSC approval is required if the school is not on probation) • Implements the Plan Office of Local School Council Relations

  11. The LSC’s Role • Consults with the principal on the priorities & development of the CIWP & Budget • Holds at least two (2) Public Meetings to present the proposed CIWP and Budget to the school community (the meetings must include an opportunity for public input and comment) • Approves the CIWP & Budget (required if the school is not on probation) • Monitors the implementation of the CIWP • Holds at least two (2) Public Meetings during the school year for Principal and LSC to report on progress and problems with implementation of the plan Office of Local School Council Relations

  12. CIWP Team • A CIWP team consists of 6-12 committed stakeholders that are responsible for the development of the CIWP. • Parent and teacher participation in the process is required for all schools. • As chairperson of the CIWP Team, the principal will appoint other team members from the school and community, which can include members from the ILT and/or LSC. • While the CIWP Team should not be too large, it should include people with a variety of perspectives. Office of Local School Council Relations

  13. Elementary Goal Setting • Goal Setting is formed from the 2011 School Scorecards, includes “Academic Achievement”, “Climate and Culture,” and “State Assessment” sections. • Schools’ SY2011 scores are automatically populated. • Schools enter SY2012 goals, which have already been set with the network. • Schools develop SY2013 and SY2014 goals. • Visit www.cps.edu/performance to learn more about the metrics reported on the scorecard. • ISAT scores include all students in the aggregates, including English Language Learners. Office of Local School Council Relations

  14. High School Goal Setting • Goal Setting is formed from the 2011 School Scorecards, includes “Academic Achievement”, “Climate and Culture,” and “State Assessment” sections. • Schools’ SY2011 scores are automatically populated. • Schools enter SY2012 goals, which have already been set with the network. • Schools develop SY2013 and SY2014 goals. • PSAE and ACT scores include all students in the aggregates, including English Language Learners. • EPAS goals are average scores for the spring tests. The EPAS Growth scores will be automatically calculated. Office of Local School Council Relations

  15. School Effectiveness Framework • Schools use the School Effectiveness Framework to asses the school’s level of implementation on each research-based instructional practice from the School Effectiveness Framework. • The SEF is divided into seven dimensions, with each having several Effective Practices. • Schools provide evidence for each Effective Practice. See evidence examples to the left. • Schools evaluate themselves on a scale of 1-4 • A Typical School is evaluated as a “2” • An Effective School is evaluated as a “4” Example of Good Supporting Evidence Effective Practice: High Expectations & College going Culture Strong We strive to build a culture around college-readiness standards; however, we received a “weak” on the My Voice, My Schools survey for Ambitious Instruction. We have started the implementation of CCSS and have developed a training plan for our teachers. Weak Our staff works hard to set high expectations for our students. With the implementation of Common Core, our standards will increase in rigor. Office of Local School Council Relations

  16. Theory of Action After completing the self-evaluation from the School Effectiveness Framework, many schools created a Theory of Action to guide their planning for SY2012. Schools may use their Theory of Action to determine their Strategic Priorities for the CIWP The Theory of Action identifies Key Levers, which are specific activities aligned to the SEF dimensions that will impact the instructional core in order to help the school reach its student achievement goals. A copy of the Theory of Action template can be downloaded from www.cps.edu/commoncore. Office of Local School Council Relations

  17. Strategic Priorities • Schools will develop 3 to 5 strategic priorities. These should not be comprehensive of all school activities. • Each priority description should be a full sentence that defines a distinct area of focus around which an action plan will be developed. See an example to the left. • Each priority will have a rationale that shows what data was used to determine the priority, how the priority impacts instruction, and how the priority helps to achieve the school’s goals. Priority Example Weak Implement RTI Strong Provide reading and mathematics intervention to students flagged on beginning of year screeners and monitor progress Office of Local School Council Relations

  18. Aligning District & School Priorities District Priorities School Priorities • School’s priorities should reflect the district priorities. • Some guiding questions: • How are we ensuring curricular alignment to standards? • How are we organizing our time to meet student learning and teacher collaboration needs? • How are we measuring our effectiveness in supporting the continuous improvement of instructional practice? Office of Local School Council Relations

  19. Action Plan • Each strategic priority will have an Action Plan consisting of implementation milestones. • Milestones should be specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time-bound (SMART) and lead to the full implementation of the priority. See an example to the left. • Each milestoneshould identify the category, students served, responsible party, and timeline. • The monitoring section should be blank for now. This section will be used to track the school’s progress during the upcoming school year. Milestone Example Strong In each classroom, conduct an audit of existing texts aligned to Common Core State Standards and invest in supplemental nonfiction texts Weak Purchase new reading/language arts texts. Office of Local School Council Relations

  20. Summary Page • The Summary Page is a quick guide to summarize the CIWP. • The Summary Page is a snap-shot that includes the school’s mission, strategic priorities, and a chart of the school’s student performance goals. Office of Local School Council Relations

  21. Characteristics of Weak CIWPs A weak CIWP may contain: • A Self-evaluation on School Effectiveness Framework is not an accurate reflection of the school’s level of implementation of the effective practices • Strategic priorities that are too broad (ex. Implement Common Core State Standards) or are too specific (ex. Order literacy texts aligned to Common Core) • Strategic priorities that do not have a rationale that supports the strategy as a focus to improve the school. • Milestones that do not align to the strategic priority or are not realistic and attainable. Office of Local School Council Relations

  22. Characteristics of Strong CIWPs Strong CIWPs have these characteristics: • Self-Evaluation on School Effectiveness Framework is an accurate reflection based off of data (i.e. student achievement, My Voice, My Schools survey, observations, etc.) • Strategic priorities are full sentences that define distinct areas of focus around which an action plan will be developed. • Each strategic priority has a rationale that shows how the strategy reflects district initiatives, how it will impact student achievement, and how the priority was determined. • Milestones are not a “laundry list” of activities, but instead are significant steps that a school must accomplish in the implementation of the strategic priority. Office of Local School Council Relations

  23. Approval Cover Page • When the CIWP and Budget are complete, the LSC and PAC (if applicable) will be presented with both, and should have the opportunity to provide feedback. • The principal will check off that all of the required components are completed and included in the plan. • For schools that are not on probation, LSC approval is required. • For schools on probation and/or in NCLB school improvement status, approval of the network’s Chief of Schools is required. • Parent/LSC/PAC and teacher participation in the planning process is a requirement for all schools. Office of Local School Council Relations

  24. Monitoring • Throughout the year, ILT’s will use the Monitoring section built into each priority’s Action Plan to track the school’s progress and update the CIWP. • Networks may establish a periodic check-in process with schools. Office of Local School Council Relations

  25. Related Plans The CIWP serves as the school’s strategic planning process, and was designed to be as streamlined as possible. To ensure all compliance requirements are met, some schools will have other plans to complete. The table below outlines the additional plans and which schools should complete them. Office of Local School Council Relations

  26. The School Budget • Is aligned to the CIWP • Is consistent with law, Board policies, and State and CPS standards • Budget is comprehensive of all spending, including the 3-5 strategic priorities and any operational and other activities • Sources of Funding: • General State Aid – Fund 115 • Supplemental State Aid or “SGSA” – Fund 225 • NCLB Title I and other Titles – Funds 332 - 367 Office of Local School Council Relations

  27. CIWP Planning Resources Planning Resources are available at www.cps.edu/CIWP : • CIWP Planning Guide • Principal & ILT Training PowerPoint Presentation • LSC Training PowerPoint Presentation • LSC & Network CIWP Checklist • Related Plans (Fund Compliance, Capital Outlay, Parent Plans, & Attendance Plan) Office of Local School Council Relations