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Aurora. Michael Lie 6B. Aurora is a natural electrical phenomenon characterized by the appearance of streamers of reddish or greenish light in the sky, especially near the northern or southern magnetic pole . Aurora also appear in one day (morning and night). Aurora is.

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aurora

Aurora

Michael Lie 6B

aurora is

Aurora is a natural electrical phenomenon characterized by the appearance of streamers of reddish or greenish light in the sky, especially near the northern or southern magnetic pole.

  • Aurora also appear in one day (morning and night)
Aurora is ............
causes

Aurora’s are caused by the bombardment or ( like a an explosive thing that it explode) of solar electrons on oxygen and nitrogen atoms. The electrons literally excite the oxygen and nitrogen atoms high in the atmosphere to create the beautiful light show we know as an aurora.

Causes
how aurora happens

Aurora happens in the air because every air we breath it has diffrent kind of gases. The voltage pushes electrons ( which are very light) towards the poles, accelerating them to high speeds. They zoom along the field lines towards the ground to the north and south, until huge numbers of electrons are pushed down into upper layer of the atmosphere, called ionosphere.

How aurora happens???
ionosphere1

Ionosphere is one of the atmosphere layers and ionosphere is the highest or the farthest layers from earth to ionosphere the distance is about 350 km far.

Atmosphere layers

Ionosphere
effect

The effect is caused by the interaction of charged particles from the sun with atoms in the upper atmosphere. In northern and southern regions it is respectively called aurora borealis or Northern Lights and aurora australis or Southern Lights.

  • borealis from Latin, 'northern', based on Greek Boreas, the god of the north wind; australis from Latin, 'southern', from Auster 'the south, the south wind
Effect
beliefs

According to the Inuits (people in the polar area), the northern lights are caused by the souls of dead people playing soccer in the sky, celestial football, with the skull of a walrus.

Beliefs
why aurora always appear in the north poles and south poles

The aurora can be seen most strongly at the poles of the Earth. In the north, it is called Aurora Borealis and in the south, it is called Aurora Australias. Of the two poles, the aurora can be seen the strongest near the arctic circle in the Northern Hemisphere. The reason that the Aurora can only be seen at the poles has to do with how the Earth's magnet field acts. The Earth has a metal core.

  • The aurora borealis is called northern dawn in latin it is also called the "northern lights". The aurora borealis most often occurs from September to October and March to April. Aurora australias is the same as aurora borealis.
Why aurora always appear in the north poles and south poles
bibliography

http://odin.gi.alaska.edu/FAQ/

  • http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/aurora
  • http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070226180204AAIwFSs
  • http://weather.about.com/od/spaceweather/ss/topauroras_5.htm
  • http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/43410/aurora
  • http://www.greenland.com/en/about-greenland/natur-klima/nordlys.aspx
  • http://www.exploratorium.edu/learning_studio/auroras/happen.html
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurora_(astronomy)
  • http://ffden-2.phys.uaf.edu/211.fall2000.web.projects/christina%20shaw/WhereCanSee.html
Bibliography