Prepared for the Professional Learning Network of the Virginia Association of School Superintendents by Dan Mulligan, E - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Prepared for the Professional Learning Network of the Virginia Association of School Superintendents by Dan Mulligan, E

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  1. CELEBRATE THE STRUGGLE: Empowering students to develop a deep understanding of essential knowledge, skills, processes, and vocabulary Essential Vocabulary Essential Skills LEARNING TARGET Focus Area: English K – 5 Essential Knowledge High Expectations Prepared for the Professional Learning Network of the Virginia Association of School Superintendents by Dan Mulligan, Ed. D., flexiblecreativity.com February 2014

  2. Resources to share…

  3. Hampton Road’s Natural Law of School Lots of snow days in January and February Last faculty meeting of 2013 -2014 in July!

  4. Effective Instruction: focus on essential knowledge, skills, processes, & vocabulary • Three types of curricula exist in any classroom: • The Intended Curriculum: content/skill specified by the state, division, or school at a particular grade level. • The Implemented Curriculum: content/skill actually delivered by the teacher. • The Attained Curriculum: content/skill actually learned by the students. Implemented Curriculum Attained Curriculum Intended Curriculum

  5. “Seven Survival Skills for the New Economy”~Tony Wagner, The Global Achievement Gap • Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving • Collaboration across Networks and Leading by Influence • Agility and Adaptability • Initiative and Entrepreneurialism • Effective Oral and Written Communication • Accessing and Analyzing Information • Curiosity and Imagination “Rigor” is using academic knowledge to create new knowledge/content and to solve real problems. “Engagement” begins with the MIND, not with the HANDS (that is a very loose paraphrase) — activities & action do not equal “rigor”

  6. 4 – second partner Find a NEW friend in the room from a different school and/or division. Find 2 comfortable seats and relax. *Please bring a pen(cil)!

  7. Please send a table representative to pick-up a resource for each team member. instructional strategies Work collaboratively (e.g., construct viable arguments, critique, agree) to identify key words that capture the essential elements of instructional strategies with fidelity. Enjoy working with your new best friend.

  8. GoodInstruction(Keep it Simple…Keep it Real) “We can, whenever and wherever we choose, successfully teach all children whose schooling is of interest to us. We already know more than we need to do that. Whether or not we do it must finally depend on how we feel about the fact that we haven’t so far.” ~Ron Edmonds

  9. If you want a learner to truly understand and own essential knowledge, expand your exploration from ‘what it is’ to also ‘what it is NOT’.

  10. Work with your partner to prepare a conceptual example that can be shared with your staff.

  11. 4 – second partner I just love these Dan Mulligan workshops! Did you bring your handout with you? Introduce your partner to your table team members.

  12. here we are…

  13. “A positive attitude may not solve all of your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth it.” -Maya Angelou

  14. page 6 Essential Vocabulary

  15. page 7 Identifying the words to teach… Find out which words are "your" words. Read the Curriculum Framework for your grade level, highlighting the words you think your students won't know. Then go back to each year prior to yours and highlight those words. Next, create a pre-assessment for your students with these critical words and glue it in their Interactive Notebook. A simple list of words followed by columns marked "Yes" (I understand), "No" (I don't understand) and "Maybe" (I might understand) is a start. Use this information and your professional judgment to decide which words have not yet been mastered and require instruction. WORD SORT + Rigor with Nurturing

  16. Book A page 2

  17. Book A page 4 & 5

  18. page 2 Common Core and College and Career Words McREL researchers estimate 85% of achievement test scores are based on the vocabulary of the standards. Students from poverty, ELL students, and other at-risk students are particularly in need of learning these words in ways that meet their specific learning needs. CRITICAL VERBS Analyze Articulate Cite Compare Comprehend Contrast Delineate Demonstrate Describe Determine Develop Distinguish Draw Evaluate Explain Identify Infer Integrate Interpret Locate Organize Paraphrase Refer Retell Suggest Support Summarize Synthesize Trace CRITICAL NOUNS Alliteration Analogy Argument Central Idea Conclusions Connections Connotative Language Details Evidence Figurative Language Illustrations Interaction Metaphor Mood Point of View Rhetoric Simile Stanza Structures Theme Tone Trace

  19. Sample VA SOLItem Stems As many as thirteen of the critical words can be found in the VA SOL kindergarten standards.

  20. Extra for Experts As many as thirteen of the critical words can be found in the ELA kindergarten standards. With a partner, create a set of five questions that involve the use of as many critical words as appropriate to the standard.

  21. SpintheWord modified VA SOL Essential Nouns and Verbs • Remove the cards from the bag. • Place the deck of cards face down in the center of the table. • Determine the order of playing by each person rolling the die. • Each card contains: • Math vocabulary word, and • Method of giving clues • Remember: • Each person has a turn, • Each person has a lifeline! • Enjoy!

  22. Nouns and Verbs nouns

  23. Click on the arrow to start and stop spinner.

  24. page 7 What Educators Can Do to Improve Vocabulary? A six-step process for teaching vocabulary: The teacher provides a description, explanation, or example of the new term. Ask students to restate the description, explanation, or example in own words. Ask students to construct a picture, symbol, or graphic representing the term. Engage students periodically in activities that help them add to their knowledge of the terms in their notebooks. Periodically ask students to discuss the terms with one another. Involve students periodically in games that allow them to play with the terms.

  25. page 30

  26. Leslie Williams, Hampton City Schools!

  27. Be an active reader! • Work with your partner to annotate the text: • Place a box around and number each paragraph. • After reading the passage • Box each main idea; • Underline supporting details; and • Cloud any word that you think someone in our class would struggle to understand its meaning. • Use context clues or root words to help you understand the word. • Have fun!

  28. Answer the Questions… Question the Answers… • Working with your partner – • Refer to the boxed and underlined information in the passage to identify at least fivethinkingquestions from the list. • Discuss the value of each question in developing essential skills and processes for your students. • Enjoy!

  29. Answer the Questions… Question the Answers…

  30. Vocabulary Review Activities and Games Jigsaw Team A: Strategies 1 -4 Team B: Strategies 5 – 8 Team C: Strategies 9 – 12 Team D: Strategies 13 – 17 • Form groups of four. Letter off as A, B, C, and D. • Form a temporary team of like letter teams • As an expert team, review the activities/games (pages 8 - 20) and record a summary of each strategy. • Return to your home team to share your focus activities/games. • Identify the TOP 3 to share with your staff. Extra Time… Check out the bonus structures on page 21 to 24!

  31. Thinking inside the Box What is a strategy students experience in your school that has proven effective in deepening student’s understanding of essential vocabulary? Why is it effective? How do teacher(s) effectively engage students in higher-order thinking as required by Virginia’s revised SOL (and beyond)? Does it involve differentiation, technology, project-based etc.? What is one effective strategy teachers used in your school to prepare students for the SOL assessment?

  32. Sharing outside the Box What is a strategy students experience in your school that has proven effective in deepening student’s understanding of essential vocabulary? Why is it effective? How do teacher(s) effectively engage students in higher-order thinking as required by Virginia’s revised SOL (and beyond)? Does it involve differentiation, technology, project-based etc.? What is one effective strategy teachers used in your school to prepare students for the the SOL assessment?

  33. Premise of the Workshop As the United States continues to compete in a global  economy that demands innovation, the U.S. education system must equip students with the four Cs: • critical thinking and problem solving, • communication, • collaboration, and • creativity and innovation.

  34. Substitution Augmentation Modification Redefinition Model The Substitution Augmentation Modification Redefinition Model offers a method of seeing how computer technology might impact teaching and learning.  It also shows a progression that adopters of educational technology often follow as they progress through teaching and learning with technology.   While one might argue over whether an activity can be defined as one level or another, the important concept to grasp here is the level of student engagement. One might well measure progression along these levels by looking at who is asking the important questions.  As one moves along the continuum, computer technology becomes more important in the classroom but at the same time becomes more invisibly woven into the demands of good teaching and learning. SAMR model developed by Dr. Ruben Puentedura http://www.hippasus.com/

  35. Page 3 & 4

  36. Depth of Knowledge (Thinking) • Level 1 Recall of a fact, information, or procedure • Level 2 Use information or conceptual knowledge, two or more steps, etc. • Level 3 Requires reasoning, developing a plan or sequence of steps, some complexity, more than one possible answer • Level 4 Requires an investigation, time to think and process multiple conditions of the problem