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Integrated Media Using Salvaged Pages Carrie A. Olson USHMM Teacher Fellow. “These writings capture the experience of young people from the inside—not as the Nazis decreed it, not as observers witnessed it, not as historians made sense of it after events occurred.” ( Zapruder ).

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

Integrated Media Using

Salvaged Pages

Carrie A. Olson

USHMM Teacher Fellow

slide2

“These writings capture the experience of young people from the inside—not as the Nazis decreed it, not as observers witnessed it, not as historians made sense of it after events occurred.” (Zapruder)

slide3

They wrote with no knowledge of the outcome.

  • They observed and recorded:
      • What they ate and how they dealt with hunger
      • How they communicated.
      • How they dealt with loss of home and family.
      • How they continued to hope for a better future.
slide4

Alexandra Zapruder

Voices on Antisemitism

USHMM Podcast Series

slide5

Hope & Despair

    • Anonymous Boy: Lodz Ghetto
      • June 11, 1944, p. 371
      • July 15, 1944, p. 383
  • Compassion & Empathy Despair as Part of Suffering
    • Anonymous Girl: Lodz Ghetto
      • March 5, 1942, p. 234
  • Hope for Individual Survival Hope for the World
    • Elsa Binder: Stanislawow, Poland
      • January 30, 1942, p. 319
slide6

“These diaries remind us that even in the face of annihilation it can be a worthy act of defiance to write down your story and proclaim to the world, ‘I exist…

I’m still here’”

-Lauren Lazin

director and Academy Award Nominee,

Tupac: Resurrection

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What are your immediate thoughts?

Which images or diary passages stand out for you?

What qualities set those diarists apart?

What is new information you learned?

What surprised you?

What evoked a strong feeling?

What questions did the film raise?

What do you want to know more about?

How did the voice of these young people add to your understanding of the Holocaust?

slide8

Zapruder saw how the writers shifted between varying perspectives, voices, and scopes of interest.

DawidRubinowicz

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She developed one organizing principle to untangle the shifting nature of the diarists’ writing by considering the different perspective or “worlds.

Eva and PetrGinz

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Zapruder identified these ‘worlds’ as:

    • 1) The internal world with the voice of reflecting;
    • 2) The immediate world with the voice of reporting;
    • 3) The external world with the voice of chronicling.

DawidRubinowicz

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The “world” is a model for students to engage in the process of literary analysis.

Students will to learn that the diarists wrote for many different reasons, in many different styles and under very different circumstances.

Elisabeth Kaufman

slide12

REPRODUCIBLE 13

  • Internal Perspective/Reflecting
  • Most personal of these
  • Reflecting voice
  • Self-examination, their inner lives, their deepest thoughts and feelings.
  • Matters of character, dreams, hopes
  • Relationships and conflicts with family, friends, etc
  • Faith, religion, and belief (or lack of belief) in God.

Moshe Flinker

slide13

REPRODUCIBLE 14

  • Immediate World/Reporting
  • One step removed from the internal one
  • Daily lives or important events that occur within the writer’s personal
  • Reporting tone, often devoid of emotion or personal reflection
  • Great detail, with an emphasis on accuracy and specificity.

Peter Feigel

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REPRODUCIBLE 15

  • External World/Chronicling
  • More removed from the personal life
  • Chronicle a series of events as it happened to their community, or capture a
  • Most literary forms of expression;
  • Chroniclers capture in writing scenes and incidents
  • See and sketch these moments for their generality

YitskhokRudashevkski

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How does each “world” inform you about the Holocaust?

What factors impact how the diarists express themselves?

As you read this excerpts, keep in mind the factors that shape your own “world” and voice.