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"Something hidden. Go and find it. Go and look behind the Ranges – Something lost behind the Ranges. Lost and waiting for you. Go!" Rudyard Kipling - The Explorer. Using Buckles Plots to Aid Log Analysis. By Kenneth Chaivre. Wednesday June 25, 2008.

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Presentation Transcript
slide1
"Something hidden.

Go and find it.

Go and look behind the Ranges –

Something lost behind the Ranges.

Lost and waiting for you. Go!"

Rudyard Kipling - The Explorer

using buckles plots to aid log analysis

Using Buckles Plots to Aid Log Analysis

By Kenneth Chaivre

Wednesday June 25, 2008

problems with routine log analysis
PROBLEMS WITH ROUTINE LOG ANALYSIS
  • High Sw wells may produce gas with very little or no water
  • Low Sw wells produce water or fail to produce.
  • Similar looking wells produce differently.
  • Leads to Changing “m” and “n”
review of r s buckles paper 1965
Review of R. S. Buckles Paper - 1965
  • Part of Volumetric Calculation is Ø * (1-SW)
  • Ø * (1-SW) = Ø – Ø*SW
  • Buckles showed that Ø * SW irr is a constant
    • (Ø * SW is the Buckles Number
    • or Bulk Volume Water)
  • For Hand Calculations Ø – Constant is a quick and easy way to calculate Ø * (1-SW)
  • Showed that Ø * SW is related to grain size.
buckles plot

Fine Grain

SWirr

Transition

High Perm

Coarse Grain

Low Perm

BUCKLES PLOT

Transition

uses of the buckles plot
Uses of the Buckles Plot
  • Identify Swirr Zones for Analysis
    • i.e. Calculate Capillary Pressure
  • Identify One Type of Low Resistivity Pay
  • Identify Stratigraphic Flow Units
    • Environments of Deposition
calculations with swirr
Calculations with Swirr
  • If Swirr is Known and
  • If Permeability (k) can be estimated then
    • Capillary Pressure (Pc) can be estimated
      • Pc= (19.5*Swirr^-1.7)*(k/100*Phie)^-0.45
    • Height Above Free Water (H) can be calculated
      • H= (.35 for gas)*(Pc)
      • H= (.7 for medium oil) * (Pc)
capillary pressure
Capillary Pressure
    • Pore Throat Radius (r) can be calculated
      • r = (108.1) / Pc
  • Winland r35 Values– delineate commercial hydrocarbon reservoirs
    • R35 = 5.395 * ((K^0.588)/(100*PHIE^0.864))
    • R35 < 0.5μm (microns) – Tight
    • R35 > 0.5μm (microns) – Will Flow
carthage bvw g with structure
CARTHAGE BVW G with Structure

Blue – 0.02 Red – 0.04

slide43
Cotton Valley Sand

Wave reworked deltaic shoreline.

Fine grained argillaceous sandstones

Late Cotton Valley Time

carthage bvw g with structure1
CARTHAGE BVW G with Structure

Blue – 0.02 Red – 0.04

cvs g qgas vs bvw
CVS G Qgas vs BVW

Qgas – from Production Logs

Fewer points

BVW

Channel? In area of poorer production.

results in carthage field
RESULTS IN CARTHAGE FIELD
  • Perf’ing more and better zones
  • Better Frac and completion techniques
conclusions
CONCLUSIONS
  • Useful in Establishing Capillary Pressure
    • Use several equations to find depth to free water
  • Differentiate Between Zones that Look Alike on Logs but Produce Differently.
    • Help Establish Sw Cutoffs
    • Different Rocks need Different Cutoffs
  • Suggests Environment of Deposition
  • Makes You Ask Questions
references
REFERENCES
  • Buckles, R. S., 1965, Correlating and Averaging Connate Water Saturation Data: The Journal of Canadian Petroleum Technology, v. 5, p.42 -252
  • Aguilera, R., 2002, Incorporating capillary pressure, pore throat aperture radii, height above free-water table and Winland r35 values on Pickett plots: AAPG Bulletin V86 No. 4 p. 605-624
  • Doveton, J. H., 1994, Graphical Techniques for the Analysis and display of Logging Information: Chapter 2 Vol CA 2: p 23-46 Geologic Log Analysis Using Computer Methods
  • Doveton, J. H., 1999, Integrated Petrophysical Methods for the Analysis of Reservoir Microarchitechure – a Kansas Chester Sandstone Case Study: AAPG 1999 Midcontinent Section, Transactions, Geoscience for the 21st Century
  • PfEFFEER Concepts: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Gemini/Help/Pfeffer-theory
  • Asquith, G. and Gibson C., 1983, Basic Well Log Analysis for Geologists: p.98
thanks
THANKS
  • Xindi Wang
  • Christy Demel
  • Pat Noon
  • Matt Pickrel
  • Randy Nesvold