sacred earth land ethic and indigenous identity from colonialism to contemporary issues l.
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Sacred Earth: Land ethic and indigenous identity from colonialism to contemporary issues. link between landscape and native identity Natural world affects and is affected by humans Environmental degradation= compromised identity

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sacred earth land ethic and indigenous identity from colonialism to contemporary issues
Sacred Earth:Land ethic and indigenous identity from colonialism to contemporary issues

link between landscape and native identity

Natural world affects and is affected by humans

Environmental degradation= compromised identity

Indigenous rights to lands sought by multinational corporations for economic gain

indigenous perspectives

Indigenous Perspectives

Place-bound spirituality

Animism

Natural world treated with same respect as given to human brothers and sisters

“natural law”

Cyclical

Reciprocal

Stewards—not owners—of the land on which they depend for survival

oral tradition

Oral Tradition

Transparency of language

Fools Crow nomenclature

Place names “where the fawns are”

Storytelling

Link stories with landscape features

Relations with land and with others (e.g. Coyote)

Navigation

Power of words to create reality

LanguagePerceptionsActions/Behaviors

From land and orality identity, community, well-being, power

historical background

Historical Background

Colonialism

Europeans leave behind vastly deforested England, “discover” land= fresh resources to be exploited

Dichotomous

Capitalism

Indefinite, linear pursuit of “progress” in terms of economic gain

Disregard for other ways of Knowing (Indigenous perspectives)

power

Power

Native peoples historically and contemporarily marginalized

Power of words: savage, uncivilized, unintelligent, impeding progress

Justifies continued oppression and exploitation

Dominant culture: hierarchical

Native peoples and perspectives excluded from policy- and decision-making

close to home northern alberta tar sands
Close to Home:Northern Alberta Tar Sands

Bitumen=“dirty oil”

20% U.S. oil consumption

Exploitative use and pollution of fresh water

Leveling of boreal forest

Fatally affecting First Nations peoples who depend on land and river for subsistence

perilously out of balance

Perilously out of Balance

Support indigenous assertion of treaty rights and inclusion in policy-making

Responsibility for oneself

People, place, practice, and perception are inseparable

Our survival depends on restoring equilibrium