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Art Appreciation

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  1. Art Appreciation October 4, 2010: Photography (Chapter 9)

  2. Timothy H. O’Sullivan, Ancient Ruins in the Canyon de Chelle(1873)

  3. Paul Martin, Entrance to Victoria Park (1893)

  4. Lewis Hine, Breaker Boys Working in Ewen Breaker of Pennsylvania Coal Co. (1911)

  5. Hermann Krone, Still Life of the Washerwoman (1853)

  6. Photography and the traditional arts

  7. Photography and the traditional arts • “Original” and “copy”

  8. Photography and the traditional arts • “Original” and “copy” • Photography as the “democratic” art form

  9. Photography and the traditional arts • “Original” and “copy” • Photography as the “democratic” art form • Photography = communicates RELATIVE truth

  10. Photography and the traditional arts • “Original” and “copy” • Photography as the “democratic” art form • Photography = communicates RELATIVE truth

  11. Photography and the traditional arts • “Original” and “copy” • Photography as the “democratic” art form • Photography = communicates RELATIVE truth • aesthetic form or document of life?

  12. Photography and the traditional arts • “Original” and “copy” • Photography as the “democratic” art form • Photography = communicates RELATIVE truth • aesthetic form or document of life?

  13. The camera obscura

  14. The first photograph – Niepce (1825)

  15. Louis Daguerre

  16. Louis Daguerre • Invented the daguerreotype process with Niepce

  17. Louis Daguerre • Invented the daguerreotype process with Niepce • Image formed through mercury and silver compound to produce an image on a silver plate

  18. Problems with the Daguerreotype • There was no negative; only originals • Left-right reversal • Expensive silver plates • Very fragile • Highly poisonous bromine & mercury vapors

  19. Daguerre’s Le boulevard du temple (1838)

  20. Problems with the Daguerreotype • There was no negative; only originals • Left-right reversal • Expensive silver plates • Very fragile • Highly poisonous bromine & mercury vapors • Long exposure times

  21. The Calotype Process

  22. The Calotype Process • Introduced by Fox Talbot in 1841

  23. The Calotype Process • Introduced by Fox Talbot in 1841 • Photography on paper, with a few minutes of exposure time in good light

  24. The Calotype Process • Introduced by Fox Talbot in 1841 • Photography on paper, with a few minutes of exposure time in good light • Advantage over daguerreotype: prints could be made

  25. The Calotype Process • Introduced by Fox Talbot in 1841 • Photography on paper, with a few minutes of exposure time in good light • Advantage over daguerreotype: prints could be made • Paper lessened the detail of the picture

  26. The Calotype Process • Introduced by Fox Talbot in 1841 • Photography on paper, with ½ hour exposure time • Advantage over daguerreotype: prints could be made • Paper lessened the detail of the picture

  27. The Collodion process

  28. The Collodion process • Renders both daguerreotype and calotype obsolete – 1851

  29. The Collodion process • Renders both daguerreotype and calotype obsolete – 1851 • Replace the calotype’s paper with glass

  30. The Collodion process • Renders both daguerreotype and calotype obsolete – 1851 • Replace the calotype’s paper with glass • Creates a more detailed, stable negative

  31. The Collodion process • Renders both daguerreotype and calotype obsolete – 1851 • Replace the calotype’s paper with glass • Creates a more detailed, stable negative • Allows the artist to make an unlimited number of prints from a single negative

  32. Louis Pierson, Countess Castiglione (1860)

  33. The Collodion process • http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/videoDetails?cat=2&segid=1726&segnr=1

  34. Early experiments in photographic portraiture: daguerreotype (1843)

  35. Early experiments in photographic portraiture: daguerreotype (1843) • A tripod • The rigid posture and expressions of the sitter • Timing of the exposure • Two prints required two sittings

  36. Early experiments in photographic portraiture: calotype

  37. Early experiments in photographic portraiture: calotype David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson, Free Church of Scotland, 1843 (oil painting)

  38. Capt. Robert-Barclay Allardyce(Hill/Adamson)

  39. Hill/Adamson, The Misses Binny and Miss Monro(1845)

  40. Hill/Adamson, The Misses Binny and Miss Monro(1845) • Relative to painting, the calotype showed “the imperfect work of man … and not the perfect work of God.”

  41. Collodion’s impact on Portraiture

  42. Collodion’s impact on Portraiture • Made commercial portraiture possible on a large scale

  43. Collodion’s impact on Portraiture • Made commercial portraiture possible on a large scale • Ease of reproducing prints and better quality of prints

  44. Photography & Portraiture