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NEW MOLECULAR APPROACHES TO STUDYING THE CAUSES OF CEREBRAL PALSY PowerPoint Presentation
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NEW MOLECULAR APPROACHES TO STUDYING THE CAUSES OF CEREBRAL PALSY

NEW MOLECULAR APPROACHES TO STUDYING THE CAUSES OF CEREBRAL PALSY

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NEW MOLECULAR APPROACHES TO STUDYING THE CAUSES OF CEREBRAL PALSY

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  1. NEW MOLECULAR APPROACHES TO STUDYING THE CAUSES OF CEREBRAL PALSY Nigel Paneth MD MPH New York University Sept 12, 2011

  2. QUICK CP EPIDEMIOLOGY: PREVALENCE Population-based studies based on registries in Europe and Asia find that CP prevalence at school age is between 1.5 – 2.5 cases per thousand live births This means that about one in 500 children has CP, or about 6,000 – 10,000 new cases each year in the US. No good population data in the US, as we have no registries.

  3. QUICK CP EPIDEMIOLOGY: TIME TRENDS Increased survival of very premature infants that began in the 1960’s has not been matched by reductions in the survivor prevalence of CP. As a result a modest increase in the prevalence of CP was seen in most CP registries which may be leveling off now, as survival levels off, and possibly, as rates of CP drop in very premature infants. One recent 4-state study suggests that US prevalence might be as high as 3.5/1,000

  4. QUICK CP EPIDEMIOLOGY: COSTS • Because of the long duration and severity of many childhood disabilities, including cerebral palsy, their economic burden is very high • Estimate in 2003 of annual lifetime costs for each CP birth cohort • $11.5 billion • This makes prevention of CP and other severe childhood disabilities a high public health and public policy priority

  5. QUICK CP EPIDEMIOLOGY : TRADITIONAL RISK FACTORS • PREMATURE BIRTH • 50 fold higher risk in infants < 28 wks. • FETAL GROWTH • Moderate risk factor, especially at term. Not nearly as important as gestational age. • BIRTH ASPHYXIA Not as important as once thought, because: • Some degree of birth asphyxia is very common, and most infants recover completely • Prenatally compromised infants often respond poorly to the stress of labor ; e.g. Down’s syndrome babies have low Apgar scores.

  6. QUICK CP EPIDEMIOLOGY :NEWER PUTATIVE RISK FACTORS • COAGULATION • About 5-10% of CP is from perinatal stroke. It is plausible, but not proven, that some may have polymorphisms of the coagulation system • THYROID HORMONES • Low thyroxine after birth a risk factor (not certain if causal) in preterm; possibly also at term. A syndrome which is a form of CP (neurologic cretinism) linked to iodine deficiency in endemic goiter areas. • INFECTION/INFLAMMATION • Increasing evidence for a role of antepartum infection, especially in preterm birth (Fetal Inflammatory Response Syndrome - FIRS)

  7. GENETICS • Genes only a modest factor in CP • Recurrence risk in siblings is about 1%, a five-fold elevation in risk • Most consistent molecular genetic finding: • Apoliprotein E - modest association (odds ratios of 2-4) in 4/5 studies in presence of epsilon 2 or 4 allele, in contrast to epsilon 3 allele.

  8. QUICK CP EPIDEMIOLOGY: PREVENTION • HEAD, BODY COOLING • Head/body cooling for encephalopathic term newborns now established and is standard of care • MAGNESIUM SULFATE • Several trials and observational studies show reduction in CP with use in premature labor • CAFFEINE FOR APNEA IN PREMATURES • One trial showing halving of CP

  9. R01 NS 055101: INTEGRATED MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY OF THE ORIGINS OF CEREBRAL PALSY (AKA THE OWL STUDY) A NESTED CASE-CONTROL STUDY OF CEREBRAL PALSY INITIATED IN SEPTEMBER 2009

  10. CASE CONTROL STUDIES Ordinary (not-nested). Cases and controls are recruited without reference to a studied cohort or population. Nested. Cases and controls are part of a cohort or population already studied. OWL is nested in the cohort of births who have residual newborn blood stored by the state of Michigan. We exclude cases and controls not born in Michigan in the time period in which blood spots were stored.

  11. HYPOTHESIZED PATHWAYS STUDIED IN OWL AND CP SUB-TYPES • Hypoxic/ischemic • link to spastic quadriplegia? • Inflammatory • link to bilateral CP in prematures? • Coagulation • link to hemiplegia at term? • Thyroid hormone • link to any CP in prematures?

  12. OWL DATABASE:PARTICIPANTS • CP cases: Ages 2-16, born in MI, recruited from child neurology and CP clinics in Ann Arbor, Lansing and Grand Rapids • Matched controls: birth year, gender, and gestational age (< 28;32-34;35-37;>37 weeks)principally from area primary care practices, and, for cases < 32 weeks, newborn follow-up programs. • Siblings of cases: We recruit the nearest age sibling to cases for comparison. • Twins: We make a special attempt to find twin sets discordant for CP.

  13. SPECIAL RESOURCE FOR TWIN RECRUITMENT • The Michigan Twin Registry • established in 2007 • Supported by NIH grants to Department of Psychology at MSU (Kelly Klump PhD, PI) • Has surveyed > 5,000 twin births in Michigan from birth certificates • Intake questionnaire asks about CP

  14. OWL DATABASE:DATA COLLECTED • For cases, controls and siblings, we get • Maternal interview • Permission to review medical records • Permission to obtain birth certificates and maternal and infant hospital discharge abstracts from birth (available from Michigan Department of Community Health) • Permission to obtain and study archived newborn blood spots from state. • We also save saliva-derived DNA from family triads (father-mother-child) and siblings

  15. What do we do with the archived newborn blood spot?

  16. LABORATORIES INVOLVED MICROARRAY GENE EXPRESSION Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, MI (James Resau PhD, Kyle Furge PhD, Sok-Kean Khoo PhD) qPCR mRNA VALIDATION Department of Physiology, MSU (Julia Busik PhD) Viral DNA – Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota (Mark Schleiss MD, Yeon Choi PhD)

  17. ENROLLMENT AND DATA CAPTURE Goal was 200 singleton cases and controls and 20 discordant twin pairs in two years In 20-22 months in the field, we have enrolled 182 singleton cases, 127 matched controls (plus 49 controls in process) and 42 twin sets, 39 of them discordant for CP. We have received 249 newborn blood spot samples, 149 of which have been processed, matched, and sent to the two laboratories. performed 323 maternal interviews 958 case-control triad saliva samples with DNA extraction

  18. SOME CLINICAL FINDINGS IN THE FIRST 100 SINGLETON CASE-CONTROL PAIRS

  19. SOME INTERESTING ANTHROPOMETRIC FINDINGS(118* case-control pairs > 37 weeks)

  20. ALL SLIDES FROM THIS POINT ON ARE ABOUT NEWBORN BLOOD SPOTS “THE VALUE OF THE TRANSCRIPTOME”

  21. EVIDENCE THAT WE CAN RETRIEVE mRNA FROM NEWBORN BLOOD SPOTS PILOT WORK 2005-2008 We obtained 85 randomly selected MI blood spots from 1996 – 2004 We obtained freshly prepared filter paper blood spots from adults in a different study We obtained newborn blood spots from 15 children with CP, including from two sets of twins discordant for CP.

  22. MICHIGAN BIOTRUST Michigan law since 1987 has required storage of left-over blood from newborn genetic screening until age 21, and recently extended this requirement to permanent storage. Michigan Health department recently organized this collection of 4 million specimens into the “Michigan Biotrust for Health” The Biotrust is being made into a research-usable archive, with photography and -80 freezing of all specimens. Consent for anonymous use requested since late 2010 from all mothers (70-80% consent).

  23. WHAT CAN BE STUDIED ON THESE ARCHIVED BLOOD SPOTS? • Most remaining blood specimens from newborn genetic screening in MI are stored at ambient temperatures (although since 2008 spots are frozen at -80⁰C.) • Proteins are not well maintained on unfrozen spots • Human DNA can be retrieved • Viral and bacterial DNA can be retrieved • Surprisingly, mRNA can also be retrieved, though with some degradation over time

  24. WHAT ARE WE LOOKING FOR IN THE BLOOD SPOTS? Evidence of viral (CMV, HSV) DNA Evidence of mRNA expression profiles reflecting activation of four hypothesized pathways Other mRNA expression pathways that differ between cases and controls

  25. PILOT MICROARRAY FINDINGS1. NUMBER OF GENES EXPRESSED (Van Andel Research Institute Microarray Laboratory) Fresh blood from adults Buffy coat 9,223 genes Whole blood 8,404 genes Filter paper spot 7,067 genes Random Newborn spots 1998 archived spot 3,017 genes 2000 archived spot 3,211 genes 2003 archived spot 3,644 genes 2004 archived spot 4,067 genes

  26. PILOT MICROARRAY FINDINGS 2. RELIABILITY OF GENE EXPRESSION Gene expression in archived newborn blood spots: Reliability in three runs and N of genes detected Sample Year Average Correlation Standard Deviation Average N of genes 1998 .947 .017 3,017 2000 .894 .067 3,211 2003 . .887 .047 3,624 2004 .888 .048 4,067 All years .904 .042 3,480

  27. PILOT MICROARRAY FINDINGS3. QUANTITATIVE PCR (qPCR) FINDINGSJulia Busik laboratory, MSU Physiology

  28. PILOT MICROARRAY FINDINGS 4. qPCR CONFIRMATION (TRIPLICATE) OF GENES IDENTIFIED BY MICROARRAY Amplification plots and dissociation curves for five genes 3 Housekeeping genes CYC = cyclophyllin MRPL 11 = mitochondrial ribosomal protein L 11 HK1 = Hexokinase 1 2 Inflammatory genes ITGAX = alpha X integrin NFKB-1 = nuclear factor kappa B-1

  29. SUMMARY OF THIS PILOT WORK Haak PT, Busik JV, Kort AJ, Tikhonenko M, Paneth N, Resau JH: Archived unfrozen neonatal blood spots are amenable to microarray gene expression analysis. Neonatology 2009;95:210-216. Khoo SK, Dykema K, Vadlapatla NM, LaHaie E, Valle S, Satterthwaite D, Ramirez SA, Carrutthers JA, Haak PT, Resau JR: Acquiring genome-wide gene expression profiles in Guthrie card blood spots using microarrays. Pathology International 2011 Jan;61(1):1-6

  30. CURRENT WORK WITH BLOOD SPOTS IN OWL

  31. NEW MICROARRAY TECHNOLOGY Total RNA is extracted from three 3mm punches and concentrated using glass-fiber filter systems, and the WT-Ovation Pico RNA Amplification System (NuGEN Technologies) is used to generate single-stranded cDNA. Agilent Whole Human Genome Gene Expression 8x60K Microarray. This array has 60,000 oligonucleotide probes (60bp) covering 27,958 Entrez gene RNAs and 7,419 long intergenic non-coding RNAs. Amplification is initiated both at the 3′ end and randomly throughout the whole transcriptome.

  32. VALIDATION OF MICROARRAY DATA Case and control spots always run together as pair without identification of status to lab. DNase treatment to eliminate DNA contamination After each 50 arrays, an additional assay is performed using commercial RNA samples specified in the MicroArray Quality Control Consortium (MAQC). RNA integrity number (RIN) must be > 2.0 Correlation coefficient for VARI microarray analyses between technologists is 0.97. 1 μg cDNA is sent to Dr. Busik for qPCR analysis

  33. IMPACT OF TIME Gene expression was 18% lower in spots 6-10 years old than in spots 0-5 years old, with virtually no further decline in spots 10-14 years old. These results were slightly better, but not really different, from our pilot work The New Agilent technology in use in our study, but not in our pilot work, yields about twice as many genes, 7-8,000 compared to 3-4,000

  34. CONCLUSIONS The transcriptome is a promising tool for studying the origins of disease, by examining changes in mRNA expression of gene sets during periods of exposure or risk. The transcriptome is well preserved in filter paper blood spots, even after long periods of unfrozen storage Archived newborn blood spots can provide transcriptomic clues to the etiology of many disorders of prenatal/perinatal origin Vast collections of archived newborn blood are kept by many states (Michigan – 4 million; California – 14 million frozen; NY ?)

  35. THANKS FOR LISTENINGI’M HAPPY TO TAKE QUESTIONS (This presentation is posted at http://www.epi.msu.edu/faculty/paneth.htm)