slide1
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Teleost Fish: Bonytongues Through Anglerfish Ch. 14

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 39

Teleost Fish: Bonytongues Through Anglerfish Ch. 14 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 94 Views
  • Uploaded on

Teleost Fish: Bonytongues Through Anglerfish Ch. 14. Subdividision Euteleostei. Superorder Ostariophysi Superorder Protacanthopterygii Superorder Stenopterygii Superorder Cyclosquamata Superorder Scopelomorpha Superorder Lampridomorpha Superorder Polymixiiformes

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Teleost Fish: Bonytongues Through Anglerfish Ch. 14' - chun


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
subdividision euteleostei
Subdividision Euteleostei
  • Superorder Ostariophysi
  • Superorder Protacanthopterygii
  • Superorder Stenopterygii
  • Superorder Cyclosquamata
  • Superorder Scopelomorpha
  • Superorder Lampridomorpha
  • Superorder Polymixiiformes
  • Superorder Paracanthopterygii
  • Superorder Acanthopterygii
subdividision euteleostei1
Subdividision Euteleostei
  • Superorder Ostariophysi
  • Superorder Protacanthopterygii
  • Superorder Stenopterygii
  • Superorder Cyclosquamata
  • Superorder Scopelomorpha
  • Superorder Lampridomorpha
  • Superorder Polymixiiformes
  • Superorder Paracanthopterygii
  • Superorder Acanthopterygii
subdividision euteleostei2
Subdividision Euteleostei
  • Superorder Ostariophysi -- SuckersMinnows, Characins, and Catfishes
  • Superorder Protacanthopterygii -- Pikes, Smelts and Salmonids
  • Superorder Paracanthopterygii -- Cods and Anglerfishes
  • Superorder Acanthopterygii -- Advanced Fishes
slide7
Superorder Protocanthopterygii
  • Contains three orders
    • Esociformes
    • Osmeriformes
    • Salmoniformes
order esociformes
Order Esociformes
  • Three families:
    • Esocidae
    • Umbridae
    • Daliidae
slide9
Family Esocidae
  • Pikes, pickerels, and muskellunge:
    • Predatory; sagittiform bodies
    • Large mouth & sharp teeth
    • Found in N. America and

Eurasia

    • Important recreational spp.
    • Largest: muskellunge (musky)
      • North-Central US
      • Central Canada
slide11
Family Umbridae
  • mudminnows:
    • small
    • Slow-moving
    • Burrow in mud when disturbed
slide13
Family Dalliidae
  • blackfishes:
    • Australia and Siberia
    • Able to survive frozen in the ice
    • Remain inactive until the thaw
slide14
Order Osmeriformes
  • Two suborders:
    • Argentoidea (argentines deep-sea smelts)
    • Osmeroidei (smelts, galaxiids)
slide15
Suborder Argentoidei
  • Argentines:
    • “deep-sea smelts”
    • very numerous
    • harvested commercially in mid-water trawls
slide16
Suborder Osmeroidei
  • Smelts and galaxiids:
  • Smelts:
    • Small, silvery fish (< 30 cm)
    • Popular food fish
    • Freshwater, anadromous, marine
    • Australian salamanderfish (galaxiid)
      • Turn head sharply left or right while perched on its pectoral fin
      • Lacks lung; able to aestivate
slide17
Smelts

Salamanderfish

order salmoniformes
Order Salmoniformes
  • Family Salmonidae
    • Contains three subfamilies:
      • Salmoninae - trouts, salmon, chars
      • Coregoninae - whitefishes
      • Thymalinae – graylings
    • North America and Eurasia
    • High latitude species
      • Require high DO and cooler water for survival and reproduction
slide19
Subfamily Salmoninae
  • Trouts, salmons and chars
    • Many species have landlocked and anadromous forms
      • Onchorhynchusmykiss – rainbow trout (landlocked); steelhead (anadromous)
      • O. nerka – sockeye (anadromous); kokanee (landlocked)
slide20
Subfamily Salmoninae
  • Anadromous species
    • Eggs laid in freshwater
    • Fry hatch and develop into parrs (large spots on side of body)
    • Transform into smolts (migrates to the sea)
    • Grow to large size in sea
    • Return to FW to spawn and typically die after spawning
    • Transfer of nutrients upstream from seas to FW streams important ecologically
      • Dead salmon decay, biomass is utilized by scavengers that may ultimately be preyed upon by young salmon
slide21
Subfamily Salmoninae
  • Three important genera in North America:
    • Onchorhynchus – Pacific salmon
      • California through Canada to Alaska and throughout Siberia
      • Includes rainbow trout and cutthroat trout
    • Salmo – Atlantic salmon
      • Massachusetts to Canada; Iceland and Europe
      • Nearly extinct due to dams
      • Landlocked and anadromous forms
      • Includes brown trout – introduced to US; tolerates warm water and lower DO
    • Salvelinus – North American Chars
      • Lake trout and Brook trout
slide24
Subfamily Coreginae
  • Whitefishes:
    • Formerly an important species
    • Numbers have greatly declined relative to introduced species
slide25
Subfamily Thymalinae
  • Graylings:
    • Small trout-like fishes
    • Grey irridescent bodies
    • Long dorsal fins
slide26
Marine Habitat
  • Classified into distinct areas:
    • Pelagic- area away from the shoreline
  • Pelagic divided into distinct regions
    • Surface to 200 meters = epipelagic
      • light penetration occurs
    • 200 meters to 1000 meters = mesopelagic
      • Faint amount of light
      • Animals migrate up at night; down during day
    • 1000 meters to 4000 meters = bathypelagic
      • Practically no light
slide27
Stomiiformes
  • Marine hatchetfishes:
    • Extremely flattened laterally
    • Photophores on ventral side
      • Photophores = light producing organs
      • Provides countershading = less visible to predators
slide28
Myctophiformes
  • Lantern fishes:
    • Small black fishes
    • Photophores along entire body
    • Present in great numbers
    • Important food for many species
slide29
Lampridiformes
  • Bizarre species:
    • Opah
      • Found close to the surface; taken by the same pelagic longlines used to catch tunas and marlins and meat is sold

oarfish

slide30
Superorder Paracanthopterygii
  • Contains a number of orders that are grouped together because of similar morphology:
    • Order Percopsiformes
    • Order Ophidiiformes
    • Order Gadiformes
    • Order Batrachoidiformes
    • Order Lophiiformes
slide31
Order Percopsiformes
  • Trout perch, pirate perch, and cavefishes:
    • Possess a true spine
    • Possess an adipose fin
    • Pirate perch:
      • Pelvic fins located below pectorals
      • Anus located in the throat
    • Cavefishes:
      • Adapted to caves
      • Eyes reduced
      • Lost their pigment
      • Elongated bodies
      • Lateral line system very well-developed

Trout perch

slide32
Anal opening

Pirate Perch (Aphredoderus sayanus)

slide34
Order Ophidiiformes
  • Cusk eels :
    • Taeniform body shape
    • Found all over world
    • Mostly marine
    • Some brightly colored
  • Pearl fishes
    • Very thin fishes
    • Sharp pointed tails
    • Live inside invertebrates
      • In cloaca of sea cucumbers
      • Tickles it to get back in
slide35
Order Gadiformes
  • Cods and cod-like fishes:
    • Large and economically important group
    • Possess isocercal tails
    • haddock, walleye, pollock and hake
    • Cod:
      • Collected in great numbers off the European coast
      • Contains little fat—can be dried
      • Used by ocean-going travelers as a food source
slide37
Order Batrachoidiformes
  • Toadfishes:
    • Bottom dwellers
    • Lack pleural ribs
    • Large mouths
    • Able to produce sound
      • Muscular vibrations of swim bladder
    • midshipmen:
      • Photophores
          • Arranged on their belly like the buttons of a midshipmen’s uniform
slide38
Order Lophiiformes
  • Anglerfishes:
    • Possess modified dorsal fins “rod and lures”
  • Batfishes- odd shaped
  • monkfish
    • Bottom dweller
    • Taken in trawls
    • Once considered trash fish “poor mans lobster”
ad