state of education georgia department of education september 15 2011 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
State of Education Georgia Department of Education September 15, 2011 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
State of Education Georgia Department of Education September 15, 2011

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 64

State of Education Georgia Department of Education September 15, 2011 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 164 Views
  • Uploaded on

State of Education Georgia Department of Education September 15, 2011. Agenda. Teacher and Leader Evaluation Teacher and Leader Induction Guidelines Common Core GPS PARCC - Assessments Career Clusters College and Career Readiness Index. Teacher and Leader Evaluation Systems.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'State of Education Georgia Department of Education September 15, 2011' - chun


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
agenda
Agenda
  • Teacher and Leader Evaluation
  • Teacher and Leader Induction Guidelines
  • Common Core GPS
  • PARCC - Assessments
  • Career Clusters
  • College and Career Readiness Index
setting the stage
Setting the Stage

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.”

Lao Tzu

“Great teachers and outstanding principals strive to help every student unlock their potential and develop the habits of mind that will serve them for a lifetime. They believe that every student has a gift—even when students doubt themselves.”

Arne Duncan

update
Update
  • Status of steering committees work

Evaluation Steering Committee

Value Added/Growth Committee

Other Measures Committee

  • Integration of components into a comprehensive, aligned evaluation system for teachers and leaders
update6
Update
  • Cohesive, common-sense approach focusing on continuity and alignment
  • Emphasis on this being an integrated system, not a list of disjointed measures and components
  • Cleaner organization and terminology
slide7

Teacher Keys Evaluation System

Teacher Keys Evaluation System

(Generates a Teacher Effectiveness Measure Score)

Teacher Assessment on Performance Standards

(Data sources include observations and documentation)

Surveys of Instructional Practice

(Primary, Intermediate, Middle, and High School)

Student Growth and Academic Achievement

Tested Teachers

- Student growth percentile/

value-added measure

- Achievement gap reduction

Non-tested Teachers

- DOE-approved district achievement growth measures

- Student Learning Objectives

slide8

Leader Keys Evaluation System

Leader Keys Evaluation System

(Generates a Leader Effectiveness Measure Score)

Leader Assessment on Performance Standards

(Data sources include documentation of practice)

  • Governance and Leadership
  • Climate Surveys
  • Student Attendance
  • Retention of Effective Teachers
  • Student Achievement Growth
  • Student growth percentile/value-added measure
  • Achievement gap reduction
teacher assessment on performance standards
Teacher Assessment on Performance Standards

PLANNING

Professional Knowledge

Instructional Planning

INSTRUCTIONAL DELIVERY

Instructional Strategies

Differentiated Instruction

ASSESSMENT OF AND FOR LEARNING

Assessment Strategies

Assessment Uses

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

Positive Learning Environment

Academically Challenging Environment

PROFESSIONALISM AND COMMUNICATION

Professionalism

Communication

leader assessment on performance standards
Leader Assessment on Performance Standards

SCHOOL LEADERSHIP

Instructional Leadership

School Climate

ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP

Planning and Assessment

Organizational Management

HUMAN RESOURCES LEADERSHIP

Human Resources Management

Teacher/Staff Evaluation

PROFESSIONALISM AND COMMUNICATION

Professionalism

Communications and Community Relations

surveys
Surveys
  • Final versions of Surveys of Instructional Practice for teachers are being developed and aligned to the Teacher Assessment on Performance Standards
  • Final versions of climate surveys for leaders are being developed and aligned to the Leader Assessment on Performance Standards
surveys12
Surveys
  • Integration into the evaluation handbooks, training, and supporting materials
  • Electronic survey tools in development
  • Administration to be streamlined to minimize time commitment required
student achievement growth
Student Achievement / Growth
  • One concept, two types of measures
  • Value-added / student growth percentile measure for tested grades and subjects
  • District-level student learning objectives and other measures for non-tested grades and subjects
student achievement growth14
Student Achievement / Growth
  • District-level student learning objectives and other measures for non-tested grades and subjects
  • Developed at the district level, approved by GaDOE
  • Existing assessments may be used whenever appropriate
  • Training and support will be provided by GaDOE
pilot schedule
Pilot Schedule
  • October 3-7, 2011: Training of GaDOE and system trainers on the Teacher Keys Evaluation System
  • October 10-14, 2011: Training of GaDOE SI personnel and RESA leaders on the Teacher Keys Evaluation System
  • October 2011-December 2011: Training provided for the twenty-six RT3 districts on the Teacher Keys Evaluation System (GaDOE leads with system trainers to support).
  • December 2011: Training of GaDOE trainers on the Leader Keys Evaluation System
  • January 2012: Training provided for district personnel in the 26 RT3 districts on the Leader Keys Evaluation System.
pilot schedule16
Pilot Schedule
  • January – May 2012: RT3 Districts will pilot the Teacher Keys and Leader Keys Evaluation Systems.
  • End of 2011-2012 School Year: Reliability and validity study will be completed for the Teacher Keys Evaluation System and the Leader Keys Evaluation System.
  • 2012-2013 School Year: Restructured, validated evaluation systems will be used by the twenty-six RT3 districts in all schools, as well as offered to other districts, for school year 2012-2013. Up to 60 districts each year may choose to implement the new evaluation systems from 2012-2013 forward.
measurement of student growth
Measurement of Student Growth

Growth models move beyond proficiency or status indicators to describe the progress students, schools, and districts have made over the course of an academic year.

Many believe growth better answers the question, “Are all students learning?”

Growth models, in their most basic form, compare the academic performance of students between two points in time (such as previous year and current year).

why focus on growth
Why Focus on Growth?
  • Growth measures can help answer critical questions:
    • Did the student make a year’s worth of progress?
    • Is the student on track to meet standards?
    • Did the student grow more or less than similar students?
  • Growth measures can also be used to:
    • Enhance accountability
    • Improve teaching and learning
    • Provide an indication of educator effectiveness (when used in conjunction with other indicators)
approaches to measuring growth
Approaches to Measuring Growth

More Simplistic

  • Categorical
    • e.g. Growth from DNM to Meets
  • Gain Score
    • Current year’s scores – previous years’ scores
    • Requires a vertically-scaled assessment program

More Sophisticated

  • Value-Added
    • Considers prior student achievement (and sometimes other background variables) to determine expected growth
  • Normative
    • Compare student performance to a norm group to determine if growth is typical, high, or low

Note: All classification schemes have limitations; categories are not mutually exclusive.

Note: There is no “best” approach. Suitability depends on purpose and use.

how do growth and value added differ
How do Growth and Value Added Differ?

Growth and value added models are not necessarily mutually exclusive.

Any model that establishes a relationship between growth and effectiveness falls within the value added arena.

Growth models become value added models when the results are attributed to an educator or a program.

growth committee work to date
Growth Committee Work to Date
  • Committee’s prioritized growth model outcomes:
    • Educators have a clear understanding of growth needed for students to become proficient in a year’s time
    • Educators, holding high expectations for all students, have a deeper understanding of the impact of their teaching on the extent of student learning in classrooms, schools, districts
    • Educators are provided with reliable data with respect to the academic growth of students
    • Students and their parents have a clearer understanding of growth needed to reach proficiency and beyond
    • Community will have a clearer understanding of the extent of learning in schools
growth committee work to date22
Growth Committee Work to Date
  • State assessments to be included within any selected model:
    • CRCT, CRCT-M (if possible), EOCT
  • Deeper dive into experiences of others using value added and normative growth models

1. MA (SGP) 5. Atlanta Public (VAM-VARC)

2. TN (VAM-SAS) 6. White County(Pioneer RESA)

3. OH (VAM-SAS) 7. Dade County(VAM-SAS)

4. GA (SGP)

committee s top priorities
Committee’s Top Priorities

1. The precision of the model must be prioritized when considering the trade-offs between simplicity and sophistication.

2. The model must account for cases in which students receive instruction from multiple teachers in the same core subject.

3. The model must account for student mobility.

4. The model should work in concert with other measures of effectiveness and be stable over time.

5. Georgia must own or have rights to the model methodology and outcome data.

6. The model must be able to show change in the effectiveness of Georgia’s work force over time.

committee s ongoing work priorities
Committee’s Ongoing Work Priorities
  • The committee continues to make decisions regarding:
    • Teacher of Record and Contributing Professional Business Rules
    • Guidelines for determining which students and educators will be included in the selected model
    • Training plan for teachers, principals, districts and other stakeholders
    • Implementation guidelines
    • Reporting procedures
    • Communication
  • In addition, the state is working with a TAC to guide decisions regarding model selection, implementation, and usage
purposes of the induction task force
Purposes of theInduction Task Force
  • Establish teacher and principal induction standards and guidelines, and
  • Inform statewide policy and development in the areas of teacher and principal induction.
induction time line
Induction Time Line
  • September 30, 2011
    • Induction guidelines for teachers and principals will be published to the 26 RT3 school districts via webinar and web site
  • October 2011-May 2012
    • Department of Education will provide technical assistance to the 26 RT3 districts in designing and developing their induction programs for teachers and principals.
    • Induction Task Force will develop standards and revise guidelines as needed.
  • June 2012-May 2013
    • RT3 school districts implement teacher and principal induction programs.
induction expectations
Induction Expectations
  • Induction guidelines should be scalable, with required elements and optional elements so that districts can tailor the induction programs to their specific needs.
  • RT3 school districts are required to develop and implement teacher and principal induction programs using these guidelines.
  • All school districts in the state will be encouraged to use the induction guidelines for teachers and principals.
slide30

We have a choice. We can simply defend what we have…or create what we need.

Sixteen Trends

Their Profound Impact on Our Future

by Gary Marx

the common core state standards initiative
The Common Core State Standards Initiative
  • Beginning in the spring of 2009, Governors and state commissioners of education from 48 states, 2 territories and the District of Columbia committed to developing a common core of state K-12 English-language arts (ELA) and mathematics standards.
  • The Common Core State Standards Initiative (CCSSI) is a state-led effort coordinated by the
  • National Governors Association (NGA) and the
  • Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO).
  • www.corestandards.org
why common core standards
Why Common Core Standards
  • Preparation: The standards are college- and career-ready. They will help prepare students with the knowledge and skills they need to succeed in education and training after high school.
  • Competition: The standards are internationally benchmarked. Common standards will help ensure our students are globally competitive.
  • Equity: Expectations are consistent for all – and not dependent on a student’s zip code.
  • Clarity: The standards are focused, coherent, and clear. Clearer standards help students (and parents and teachers) understand what is expected of them.
  • Collaboration: The standards create a foundation to work collaboratively across states and districts, pooling resources and expertise, to create curricular tools, professional development, common assessments and other materials.
thomas fordham institute gps and ccss in 2010
Thomas Fordham InstituteGPS and CCSS in 2010

Georgia: Grade A-

Clarity and Specificity 3/3

Content and Rigor 6/7

Total GPS Score 9/10

Georgia is one of eight states receiving at least 9/10 points.

CCSS: Grade A-

Clarity and Specificity 2/3

Content and Rigor 7/7

Total CCSS Score 9/10

why are the common core state standards for english language arts and mathematics right for georgia
Why are the Common Core State Standards for English language arts and mathematics right for Georgia?
  • Previous work with the GPS has prepared Georgia for the implementation of the CCGPS.
  • Prior teacher and administrator GPS training ensures a smooth transition.
  • Although some content may be in different grade levels in CCSS, nearly all of the ELA and mathematics standards are addressed.
  • CCSS expectations are consistent with a single/high-rigor diploma requirement for all students.
k high school ccgps subjects
K- High School CCGPS Subjects
  • English Language Arts (ELA)
  • Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects
  • Mathematics
slide37
Common Core State Standards inEnglish Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

College and Career Readiness (CCR) Standards

  • Overarching standards for each strand that are further defined by grade-specific standards

Grade-Level Standards in English Language Arts (CCGPS)

  • K-8, grade-by-grade
  • 9-10 and 11-12 grade bands for high school
  • Four strands: Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language

Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

  • Standards are embedded at grades K-5
  • Content-specific literacy standards are provided for grades 6-8, 9-10, and 11-12
college and career readiness standards and common core state standards
College and Career Readiness Standards and Common Core State Standards
  • The College and Career Readiness Standards were written first and define the expectations for all students upon graduation from high school.
  • The K-12 grade-specific standards define end-of-year expectations and a cumulative progression designed to enable students to meet college and career readiness expectations no later than the end of high school.
  • Each Common Core State Standard is aligned to a college and career readiness standard.
college and career readiness standards ccr
College and Career Readiness Standards(CCR)

These 32 standards “anchor” the document and define

general, cross-disciplinary literacy expectations that

must be met for students to be prepared to enter

college and workforce training programs ready to

succeed. (10 Reading, 10 Writing, 6 Speaking & Listening, and 6 Language)

common core for mathematics
Common Core for Mathematics

Standards for Mathematical Content

  • K-8 grade-by-grade standards organized by domain
  • 9-12 high school standards organized by conceptual categories

Standards for Mathematical Practice

  • Describe mathematical “habits of mind”
  • Offer standards for mathematical proficiency: reasoning, problem solving, modeling, decision making, and engagement
  • Connect with content standards in each grade
k 8 mathematics standards
K- 8 Mathematics Standards
  • The K-5 standards provide students with a solid foundation in whole numbers, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions and decimals.
  • The 6-8 standards describe robust learning in geometry, algebra, and probability and statistics.
  • Modeled after the focus of standards from high-performing nations, the standards for grades 7 and 8 include significant algebra and geometry content.
  • Students who have completed 7th grade and mastered the content and skills will be prepared for algebra in 8th grade or after.
high school mathematics standards
High School Mathematics Standards
  • Call on students to practice applying mathematical ways of thinking to real world issues and challenges
  • Require students to develop a depth of understanding and ability to apply mathematics to novel situations, as college students and employees regularly are called to do
  • Emphasize mathematical modeling, the use of mathematics and statistics to analyze empirical situations, understand them better, and improve decisions
  • Identify the mathematics that all students should study in order to be college and career ready.
common core georgia performance standards ccgps professional learning and implementation timeline
Common Core Georgia Performance Standards (CCGPS) Professional Learning and Implementation Timeline

September 21, 2011 State-wide CCGPS meeting for educators and stakeholders provided by State School

3:00-4:00pm Superintendent, Dr. John Barge, and GaDOE staff via Georgia Public Broadcasting

  Use the following link to access the session and recording:

gpb.org/education/common-core

August – Dec. 2011 Technical Assistance, Webinars, Transition Documents, Resource Development

January – March 2012 K-12 grade by grade ELA and Mathematics teacher professional learning with live/interactive streaming via Georgia Public Broadcasting

Sessions will be recorded. To access all of the CCGPS 2011-2012 Live Streamed Professional Learning sessions and recordings use the following link: gpb.org/education/common-core

Ongoing professional learning and technical support will be provided for local districts/schools via RESA Mathematics Mentors and ELA Specialists and GaDOE staff

2012-2013 Year 1 Implementation/Transition

2013-2014 Year 2 Implementation; Field Test

2014-2015 Year 3 Implementation and Common Assessment

Contacts: CCGPS Coordinator - Jan Wyche (jwyche@doe.k12.ga.us)

ELA Program Coordinator - Kim Jeffcoat (kjeffcoat@doe.k12.ga.us)

Mathematics Program Coordinator - Sandi Woodall (swoodall@doe.k12.ga.us)

common core assessment
Common Core Assessment
  • Georgia is a governing state within the Partnership for the Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC), a consortium of 24 states focused on building a common assessment based on the Common Core.
    • Implementation is planned for the 2014-2015 SY
partnership for assessment of readiness for college and careers parcc
Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC)

Governing Board States Participating States

create high quality assessments
Create High Quality Assessments
  • Summative Assessment Components:
    • Performance-Based Assessment (PBA) administered as close to the end of the school year as possible. The ELA/literacy PBA will focus on writing effectively when analyzing text. The mathematics PBA will focus on applying skills, concepts, and understandings to solve multi-step problems requiring abstract reasoning, precision, perseverance, and strategic use of tools
    • End-of-Year Assessment (EOY) administered after approx. 90% of the school year. The ELA/literacy EOY will focus on reading comprehension. The math EOY will be comprised of innovative, machine-scorable items
  • Formative Assessment Components:
    • Early Assessment designed to be an indicator of student knowledge and skills so that instruction, supports and professional development can be tailored to meet student needs
    • Mid-Year Assessment comprised of performance-based items and tasks, with an emphasis on hard-to-measure standards. After study, individual states may consider including as a summative component
create high quality assessments47
Create High-Quality Assessments

Flexible

  • Mid-Year Assessment
  • Performance-based
  • Emphasis on hard to measure standards
  • Potentially summative
  • End-of-Year
  • Assessment
  • Innovative, computer-based items
  • Performance-Based
  • Assessment (PBA)
  • Extended tasks
  • Applications of concepts and skills
  • Early Assessment
  • Early indicator of student knowledge and skills to inform instruction, supports, and PD
  • ELA/Literacy
  • Speaking
  • Listening

Summative assessment for accountability

Formative assessment

parcc timeline
PARCC Timeline

SY 2012-13

First year pilot/field testing and related research and data collection

SY 2013-14

Second year pilot/field testing and related research and data collection

SY 2014-15

Full administration of PARCC assessments

Summer 2015

Set achievement levels, including college-ready performance levels

SY 2010-11

Launch and design phase

SY 2011-12

Development begins

slide49

Update on

Georgia and

Career Clusters

career clusters
Career Clusters
  • The GaDOE shall develop a curriculum for the following programs of study including, but not limited to:
    • Agriculture, food, and natural resources
    • Architecture and construction
    • Arts, audio-video technology, and communications
    • Business, management, and administration
    • Education and training
    • Finance
    • Health science
    • Hospitality and tourism
    • Human services
career clusters cont d
Career Clusters (cont’d)
  • The GaDOE shall develop a curriculum for the following programs of study including, but not limited to:
    • Information technology
    • Law, public safety, and security
    • Manufacturing
    • Government and public administration
    • Marketing, sales, and service
    • Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics
    • Transportation, distribution, and logistics
    • Energy (Not required in law but will be developed)
slide56

Georgia College and Career Ready Performance Index (GaCCRPI),High School Model Grades 9 - 12

Dr. John D. Barge, State School Superintendent

“Making Education Work for All of Georgia’s Students”

Graduation Rate

Cohort Graduation Rate (%)

Student Attendance

Student Attendance Rate (%)

Post High School Readiness

Percent of students completing 3 or more Pathway Courses

Percent of CTAE Pathway Completers earning a CTAE Industry-Recognized Credential

Percent of tested students earning a Work Ready Certificate on the ACT Work Keys Assessment

Percent of graduated students entering Technical College System of Georgia technical colleges and/or University System of Georgia 2 or 4 year colleges and universities NOT requiring remediation or support courses

Percent of students earning high school credit(s) for accelerated enrollment via Dual Enrollment, Joint Enrollment, Move On When Ready, Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate courses

Percent of graduates earning 2 or more high school credits in the same world language

Percent of AP exams receiving scores of 3 or higher and/or percent of IB exams receiving scores of 4 or higher

Percent of tested graduates scoring a minimum of 22 on the ACT (out of 36)

Percent of tested graduates scoring a minimum of 1550 on the SAT (out of 2400)

Percent of students scoring at exceeds on the Georgia High School Writing Test

Content Mastery (End Of Course Tests and Writing Assessment to be replaced by Common Core Assessments, 2014-15)

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds on the Ninth Grade Literature End of Course Test

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds on the American Literature End of Course Test

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds on the Mathematics I (or GPS Algebra) End of Course Test

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds on the Mathematics II (or GPS Geometry) End of Course Test

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds on the Physical Science End of Course Test

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds on the Biology End of Course Test

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds on the US History End of Course Test

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds on the Economics End of Course Test

slide57
Factors for Successa companion to the Georgia College and Career Ready Performance Index for High Schools

In addition to the nineteen (19) items within the Georgia College and Career Ready Performance Index, high schools may earn additional points for these six supplemental indicators:

  • Percent of students completing three credits in the same world language
  • Percent of graduated students taking the SAT or ACT
  • Percent of students earning credit in a physics course
  • Percent of ninth-grade students earning 4 Carnegie Unit Credits in 4 core content areas
  • Percent of graduated students qualifying for the Zell Miller Scholarship as awarded through legislative guidelines managed by the Georgia Student Finance Commission

To Be Considered at a Later Date

Percent of tested students scoring at a proficient level on a Soft Skills Assessment

Percent of tested students earning an AFQT score of 35 or higher on the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery

Percent of tested students scoring ‘College Ready’ on the COMPASS examination

School’s average score on the Georgia Teacher Effectiveness Measurement

School’s average score on the Georgia Leader Effectiveness Measurement

Percent of students participating in the PLAN examination

Percent of graduates completing Work Based Learning or a Senior Project

School has earned a Georgia Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Program Certification

slide58

Dr. John D. Barge, State School Superintendent

“Making Education Work for All of Georgia’s Students”

Georgia College and Career Ready Performance Index (GaCCRPI),Middle School Model Grades 6 - 8

Content Mastery and Preparation for High School

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds in ELA

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds in reading

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds in mathematics

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds in science

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds in social studies

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds on the Grade Eight Writing Assessment

Percent of students in grade eight achieving a Lexile measure greater than 1050

Student Attendance

Student Attendance Rate (%)

Supports and Intervention

Percent of English Learners with positive movement from one Performance Band to a higher Performance Band

Percent of Students With Disabilities served in general education environments greater than 80% of the school day

Percent of students in grade eight passing at least four courses in core content areas

Career Exploration

Percent of students in grade eight with a complete Individual Graduation Plan documented in GaCollege411

Percent of students completing 3 or more Career Interest Inventories from a preferred Career Interest System within GaCollege411

slide59
Factors for Successa companion to the Georgia College and Career Ready Performance Index for Middle Schools

In addition to the thirteen (13) items within the Georgia College and Career Ready Performance Index, middle schools may earn additional points for these seven supplemental indicators:

  • Percent of students successfully completing three years of courses in the fine arts and/or one world language and/or career exploratory
  • Percent of students in grade eight scoring proficient/advanced on the 21st Century Skills Technology Assessment
  • Percent of students in grades six and seven with a fully documented Fitnessgram assessment
  • Percent of students in grade eight scoring at exceeds in science
  • Percent of students in grade eight scoring at exceeds in mathematics
  • Percent of students in grade eight scoring at exceeds in social studies
  • Percent of eighth grade students earning at least one high school credit

To Be Considered at a Later Date

School’s average score on the Georgia Teacher Effectiveness Measurement

School’s average score on the Georgia Leader Effectiveness Measurement

Percent of students in grades six through eight advancing to above grade level subject acceleration and/or whole grade acceleration

slide60

Dr. John D. Barge, State School Superintendent

“Making Education Work for All of Georgia’s Students”

Georgia College and Career Ready Performance Index (GaCCRPI),Elementary School Model Grades K – 5

Content Mastery and Preparation for Middle School

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds in ELA

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds in reading

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds in mathematics

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds in social studies

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds in science

Percent of students scoring at meets or exceeds on the Georgia Five Writing Assessment

Percent of students in grade three achieving a Lexile measure greater than 650

Percent of students in grade five achieving a Lexile measure greater than 850

Student Attendance

Student Attendance Rate (%)

Supports and Interventions

Percent of English Learners with positive movement from one Performance Band to a higher Performance Band

Percent of Students With Disabilities served in general education environments greater than 80% of the school day

Career Awareness

Percent of fifth grade students completing 10 Career Awareness Modules

Percent of fifth grade students with a Career Portfolio in GaCollege411

slide61
Factors for Successa companion to the Georgia College and Career Ready Performance Index for Elementary Schools

In addition to the thirteen (13) items within the Georgia College and Career Ready Performance Index, elementary schools may earn additional points for these six supplemental indicators:

  • Percent of students enrolled in world language courses
  • Percent of students enrolled in fine arts courses
  • Percent of students in grades one through five with documented data for the Fitnessgramassessment
  • Percent of students in grade five scoring at exceeds in science
  • Percent of students in grade three scoring at exceeds in mathematics
  • Percent of students in grade five scoring at exceeds in reading

To Be Considered at a Later Date

School’s average score on the Georgia Teacher Effectiveness Measurement

School’s average score on the Georgia Leader Effectiveness Measurement

Percent of students in grades one through five advancing to above grade level subject acceleration and/or whole grade acceleration

gaccrpi calculations scores
GaCCRPI Calculations & Scores
  • The foundation of the GaCCRPI is the college and career ready indicators
  • The indicators are grouped by categories at each school level
  • A percentage rate will be calculated for each indicator
  • Scores will be provided in 3 areas to arrive at the Overall School Score:
    • Achievement Score
    • Progress Score
    • Achievement Gap Closure Score
    • Schools will also receive Star Ratings in two areas:
    • Financial Efficiency
    • School Climate
contact information
Contact Information

Avis King

Deputy Superintendent, School Improvement

aking@doe.k12.ga.us

Teresa MacCartney

Deputy Superintendent, Race To The Top

tmaccartney@doe.k12.ga.us

Mark Pevey

Implementation Director, Race To The Top

mpevey@doe.k12.ga.us

Martha Ann Todd

Director, Teacher and Leader Effectiveness

mtodd@doe.k12.ga.us

contact information64
Contact Information

Dr. Martha Reichrath,

Deputy State Superintendent for Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment

mreichra@doe.k12.ga.us

Pam Smith, GaDOE Director of Curriculum and Instruction

pamsmith@doe.k12.ga.us

Melissa Fincher, Associate Superintendent for Assessment & Accountability

mfincher@doe.k12.ga.us

David Turner, GaDOE Director of Career, Technical and Agriculture Education

dturner@doe.k12.ga.us

Becky Chambers, GaDOE Program Manager for College and Career Readiness

rchambers@doe.k12.ga.us