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Phase 2: Community Health Councils & Community Outreach. The Prepared Community. Fall 2005. Course Developers. New Mexico Department of Health Office of Health Emergency Management UNM HSC School of Medicine Center for Development & Disability Shaening & Associates, Inc.

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Phase 2: Community Health Councils & Community Outreach


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    1. Phase 2: Community Health Councils & Community Outreach The Prepared Community Fall 2005

    2. Course Developers New Mexico Department of Health Office of Health Emergency Management UNM HSC School of Medicine Center for Development & Disability Shaening & Associates, Inc.

    3. Contact Information Bruce Blair, M.A. Psychosocial Community Preparedness Planner 505-476-7866 bruce.blair@state.nm.us NMDOH Office of Health Emergency Management 2500 Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe, NM 87505 Joan Murphy Population Outreach Planner 505-476-7889 joan.murphy@state.nm.us

    4. CHCs & Community Outreach Objectives: • to understand the Prepared Community Initiative and be familiar with Phase 1 • to understand the role & importance of community outreach in emergency preparedness & response • to identify tools and procedures to provide outreach to the entire community before, during, and after a disaster • to identify tools, procedures and local networks to provide outreach targeted to people with special emergency preparedness considerations

    5. CHCs & Community Outreach • Module 1: The Prepared Community Initiative • Module 2: What Did We Learn in Phase I? • Module 3: An Overview of Community Outreach • Module 4: Targeted Outreach • Module 5: Targeted Outreach Planning

    6. CHCs & Community Outreach Agenda 9:00 Introductions, Module 1 9:45 Module 2 10:30 Break 10:45 Module 3 11:45 Lunch 12:30 Module 4 1:45 Break 2:00 Module 5 4:00 Adjourn

    7. The Prepared Community Initiative Module 1 • Why Are Community Health Councils Involved? • A Refresher on Phase 1: What Do We Mean by a Prepared Community? • Gearing Up for Phases 2 & 3: What Do We Mean by a Resilient Community?

    8. The Prepared Community Initiative Positioning Community Health Councils to be collaborative partners in health-related emergency preparedness and response • Phase 1: The Prepared Community training, Spring 2005, and development of County Health Emergency Management Profiles • Phase 2: Community Outreach training and development of local outreach; Fall – Winter, 2005-2006 • Phase 3: Community Resilience and Mobilization Planning; Spring 2006 Module 1

    9. Why Are Community Health Councils Involved in Emergency Preparedness? • What are Community Health Councils? • Maternal & Child Health Councils created by the 1991 State Legislative Session • In some counties, MCH Councils expanded to become Community Health Councils; in others DWI Councils and other groups involved • Spring 2005 – N.M. Health Council Alliance established Module 1

    10. Why Are Community Health Councils Involved in Emergency Preparedness? • CHCs are an integral part of the Public Health infrastructure. • CHCs are connectors: • connected to communities at grass-roots level • connect and collaborate with other community groups • becoming increasingly involved in local behavioral health collaboratives Module 1

    11. Phase 1: A Quick Refresher • What makes an incident an emergency or disaster? • How is emergency response managed? • What do we mean by the Prepared Community? Module 1

    12. What Makes an Incident an Emergency or Disaster? • affects entire community • community needs surpass capacity • include: • natural disasters • human-caused disasters • technological disasters • economic disasters Module 1

    13. How Is Emergency Response Managed? • Response begins and ends at the local level • Responding agency (police, fire) becomes on-site Incident Commander • Command Post is established Module 1

    14. How Is Emergency Response Managed? • If the incident exceeds local capacity, the Mayor or Chief Elected Official may request state assistance. • If the incident exceeds State capacity, the Governor may request Federal assistance. Module 1

    15. The Incident Command System (ICS) • On-scene emergency management structure which insures that: • Everyone is working within the same organizational structure. • All participants communicate on the same level with the same terminology. • Resources are utilized effectively. • ICS is flexible, with the capability to expand or contract to meet the needs of the incident. Module 1

    16. The Incident Command System (ICS) Module 1

    17. The Incident Command System (ICS) • The Incident Commander has overall leadership and responsibility. • The Command Function includes public information and risk communication. • Remember: During an emergency or disaster, all public information/risk communication MUST be coordinated through the Incident Command structure. Module 1

    18. What is a Prepared Community? • Informed and involved public • Prepared and informed professionals • Planning, preparation and policies • Communication systems and connectivity • Scientific and technical support and other resources • Administration, management, and fiscal systems Module 1

    19. Informed & Involved Public • information to help individuals & families develop emergency plans • information for non-English speakers, people with sensory disabilities, those in remote areas, & others with special response needs • culturally sensitive communication Module 1

    20. Informed & Involved Public:Role of the CHC • Develop relationships with County Emergency Manager, Local Emergency Planning Committee, first responder groups, Red Cross, etc. • Participate in local emergency planning and advocate for inclusion of health issues in emergency planning • Develop relationships with local/district public health offices Module 1

    21. Informed & Involved Public:Role of the CHC • Identify and understand various populations and vulnerable groups in community. • Identify community resources. • Create network of individuals, organizations, and agencies willing to reach out. Module 1

    22. Phase 2 of Our State-Wide Plan In Phase 2 of the Prepared Community Initiative, Community Health Councils will create/develop local outreach capabilities: • creating/developing outreach networks that would be established pre-disaster and utilized before, during, and after a disaster • identifying the “gate keepers” / leaders / communicators • determining how to reach the greatest number of people in the shortest amount of time (especially populations with special health care needs) Module 1

    23. Phase 3 of Our State-Wide Plan • Community Health Councils will develop community resilience, mobilization, and psychosocial response plans. • Plans will be integrated with the county’s Emergency Operations Plan (EOP). Remember: Always work in collaboration with local emergency management! Module 1

    24. Community Resiliency Is… • The Individual • Teaching people to access their innate resiliency • Moving beyond psychological limitations that block one’s ability to thrive; learning problem solving skills • Engaging, committing, volunteering • Seeing the community as part of their “family” Module 1

    25. Community Resiliency Is… • The Family • Family support systems • Communication, cohesion, emotional connection, mutual respect, commitment • Presence of a caring adult(s) • Spiritual wellness • Family time and routines • Family problem-solving skills • A Family Emergency Plan Module 1

    26. Community Resiliency Is… • The Community • Community support systems (social support) • Seeing the community as a “family” inclusive of all segments of the population • Availability of resources • Community engagement in its process of well-being; shared concern • The community must ultimately take ownership of the process initially begun by others. Module 1

    27. Community Resiliency • Preparedness facilitates recovery. • Preparedness facilitates rapid deployment. • Preparedness is good role modeling for others in the community. Module 1

    28. On a Related Note… • Resilience in New Mexico Schools • Creating a meaningful role for youth in the community, through: • an asset-based, injury prevention program • enhanced connections between CHCs, schools, and school-based health centers • new curricula, such as the High School First Responder Course Module 1

    29. What Did We Learn in Phase 1? Module 2 • What do New Mexico’s counties look like? • What did we find out in the Profiles? • What did we learn from what we found?

    30. What Do New Mexico’s Counties Look Like ? Module 2

    31. Catron (3,535) Colfax (14,189) DeBaca (2,132) Guadalupe (4,545) Harding (751) Hidalgo (5,343) Lincoln (19,814) Los Alamos (18,305) Mora (5,269) Quay (9,811) Roosevelt (18,121) Sierra (12,988) Socorro (18,043) Torrance (16,664) Union (3,934) Counties With PopulationsLess Than 20,000 Module 2

    32. Counties With Populations Under 20,000 Spread Over More Than 3000 Square Miles • Catron (3,535) over 6,929 square miles • Colfax (14,189) over 3,757 square miles • Guadalupe (4,545) over 3,030 square miles • Hidalgo (5,343) over 3,446 square miles * • Lincoln (19,814) over 4,831 square miles • Sierra (12,988) over 4,180 square miles • Socorro (18,043) over 6,646 square miles • Torrance (16,664) over 3,345 square miles * • Union (3,934) over 3,830 square miles *Harding (751) over 2,125 square miles (fits the same ratio) Module 2

    33. Bernalillo (573,675) Chaves (60,177) Curry (45,022) Doña Ana (178,664) Eddy (51,139) Lea (55,655) McKinley (73,973) Otero (61,577) Sandoval (96,071) San Juan (120,367) Santa Fe (134,525) Valencia (67,578) Our Larger Counties-Populations Over 45,000 Module 2

    34. Counties With 0-19 Age Group Comprising 1/3 or More of Total Population • Bernalillo: 159,294 of 573,675 • Chaves: 19,105 of 60,177 • Curry: 14,981 of 45,022 • Dona Ana: 57,721 of 178,664 • Hidalgo: 1,743 of 5,343 • Lea: 18,034 of 55,655 • McKinley: 29,767 of 73,973 • Roosevelt: 5,856 of 18,121 • San Juan: 42,039 of 120,367 • Torrance: 5,297 of 16,664 Module 2

    35. Bernalillo (66,710) Chaves (8,859) Curry (5,223) Dona Ana (19,754) Eddy (7,438) Grant (5,256) Lea (6,790) Luna (4,719) McKinley (5,332) Otero (7,786) Rio Arriba (4,672) Sandoval (10,497) San Juan (11,024) Santa Fe (15,041) Valencia (7,199) Counties With Senior Populations (Age 65 and Over) of 4,500 or More* * There are 221,091 seniors in New Mexico Module 2

    36. What Did We Find Out In The Profiles ? Module 2

    37. Populations With Different Planning Needs – Children & Youth • 10 counties have populations 0 – 19 who make up 1/3 or more of the county’s total. • Children are separated from families during the day (usually at school). • Many counties report large numbers of children are unsupervised after school (few or NO after school programs). • Elevated teen suicide rates in many counties. Module 2

    38. Populations With Different Planning Needs – Elderly • Significant number of elderly who live on their own in remote rural areas (may have limited or NO transportation). • Counties often report 850 or more grandparent-headed households, where grandparents have sole responsibility for raising some or all of their grandchildren. Module 2

    39. Populations With Different Planning Needs • Chronic Mental Illness: many counties report serious limitations in their county’s mental health resources. • Cognitive or Developmental Issues: many counties were unable to report numbers of people in this category. • Substance Abuse Issues: many counties indicate that as many as 1/3 or more of their populations have substance abuse issues. • Physical Disabilities: many counties report 2,500 or more instances per county; may include elevated state-wide rates of asthma, diabetes, cleft lip/cleft palate. Module 2

    40. Populations With Different Planning Needs • Non-English Speakers: many counties report 25% or more non-English speakers • Incarcerated & Institutionalized Individuals: most counties contain at least a county or municipal jail and many contain state facilities Module 2

    41. Populations Living In Poverty • Tend to be uninsured or underinsured • Significantly less access to the health care system • Children living in poverty often depend on school lunch programs for nutritious meals • Less prepared for emergency or disastrous events Module 2

    42. The Unseen/Unrecorded Populations • The “undocumented” population • Migrant workers • The homeless • College students • Tourists – State and National Parks • A major Boy Scout camp (Philmont) Module 2

    43. What Do Our Counties Say Are Their Greatest Needs ? General Health & Psychosocial Needs: • Need to address severe shortages of medical, dental, mental health and specialist providers • Need to promote healthier families • Need to provide better elder care Module 2

    44. What Do Our Counties Say Are Their Greatest Needs ? Emergency Management Needs: • Need more early warning devices for “critical facilities” • Need to address shortages of equipment (communication, vehicles, etc.) • Need more disaster response training for fire, police, EMS and other emergency responders • Need better communication between county agencies and integration of their plans Module 2

    45. What Did We Learn From What We Found? Module 2

    46. GeographicChallenges • Much of the state’s counties are rural or frontier in nature. • Small populations spread over significant square mileage • Distances, geography, poor road conditions, and poorly maintained communications infrastructure • Small villages with only one way in & out Module 2

    47. Family Challenges • Significant numbers of working parents separated from their children during the day; separation is compounded during an emergency. • Counties often reported 1,000 or more female head-of-households with children. • In 55% of grandparent-households, grandparents have sole responsibility for raising some or all of their grandchildren; this could represent 850 or more households. Module 2

    48. Community Challenges Some counties report: • NO current county Emergency Manager • Emergency Operations Plans (EOPs) that are not current (with some last updated in the late 1980s) • No pre-identified Emergency Operations Center (EOC) • Noticeable lack of coordination between different agencies involved in emergency response • CHCs where leadership is in disarray/disorganized Module 2

    49. Community Challenges In many counties there is: • A lack of medical, dental, behavioral health providers and poor quality of service • NO hospital…residents have to go to adjoining counties for services • Minimal ambulance/EMS services • Low-literacy rates and a need for multiple language materials for emergency response • An economy that ranges from “fragile” to non-existent (by their own report) Module 2

    50. An Overview of Community Outreach Module 3 • About Community Outreach • Variables in Outreach Planning • Reaching the Whole Community