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Charting the Future Minnesota State Colleges and Universities Draft Report of the Strategic Workgroups. “The best way to predict the future is to invent it.” – Alan Kay. Overview of today’s discussion. Critical challenges we must address Collective strengths we can leverage

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slide1

Charting the Future Minnesota State Colleges and UniversitiesDraft Report of the Strategic Workgroups

“The best way to predict the future is to invent it.”

– Alan Kay

overview of today s discussion
Overview of today’s discussion

Critical challenges we must address

Collective strengths we can leverage

Unrealized opportunities we can seize

Discussions of the recommended draft report, Charting the Future

critical challenges
Critical Challenges

Changing students

Changing technology

Changing nature of work

Need to demonstrate the competency of our graduates

Increased competition

Funding shifts that threaten access and affordability

Public perception of the quality of a MnSCU education

minnesota s population is migrating to its metropolitan a reas
Minnesota’s population is migrating to its metropolitan areas

Minnesota Population Change 1990 to 2010

Minnesota Projected Population Change 2012 to 2040

In 2010, the population was

Twin Cities- 2,849,567

Greater MN- 2,454,358

By 2040, projected population will be

Twin Cities- 3.585,328

Greater MN- 2,952,328

Source: Minnesota Department of Administration, Office of Geographic & Demographic Analysis

the twin cities metro area is growing faster than greater m innesota
The Twin Cities metro area is growing faster than Greater Minnesota

Twin Cities metro area

Greater MN

Source: MnSCU Office of Research and Planning

the number of students of color will grow in minnesota
The number of students of color will grow in Minnesota

Projected % Minority Minnesota

High School Graduates

Source: Minnesota State Demographic Center

slide8
We will continue to see an increase in the number of students attending our colleges and universities part-time

Source: MnSCU Office of Research and Planning

we will continue to see an increase in the number of students enrolling in multiple institutions
We will continue to see an increase in the number of students enrolling in multiple institutions

Source: MnSCU Office of Research and Planning

critical challenges1
Critical Challenges

Changing students

Changing technology

Changing nature of work

Need to demonstrate the competency of our graduates

Increased competition

Funding shifts threatening access and affordability

Public perception of the quality of a MnSCU education

technological changes since mnscu s inception
Technological changes since MnSCU’s inception

1995

2013

Larry Page and Sergey Brian develop search engine known as Backrub

Amazon.com sold its first book

Mass use of the internet was just beginning

Cell phones fit into a brief case versus a shirt pocket

First digital camera hit the consumer market

Toy Story premiered as the first wholly computer generated film

Backrub is now known as Google serving over 300 million people a day

3rd quarter sales in 2013 for Amazon at $15.7 billion

1.8 billion people use the internet daily

72% of internet users also use social media

328 million cell phones in use in the United States

100 million people worldwide stream YouTube daily

28 of our course offerings are now fully online or blended hybrid courses
28% of our course offerings are now fully online or blended/hybrid courses

Source: MnSCU Office of Research and Planning

critical challenge s
Critical Challenges

Changing students

Changing technology

Changing nature of work

Need to demonstrate the competency of our graduates

Increased competition

Funding shifts threatening access and affordability

Public perception of the quality of a MnSCU education

the workplace of the future will require
The workplace of the future will require

More advanced technical and communication skills

Greater intellectual agility

Capacity for independent, critical and imaginative thinking

Ability to resourcefully apply knowledge to new problems

Adeptness to embracing change and comfort with ambiguity

Ability to think globally and communicate across cultural and geographic boundaries

Deep appreciation for diverse cultures

Experience working collaboratively in teams

Preparation that is closer to the world of practice

critical challenges2
Critical Challenges

Changing students

Changing technology

Changing nature of work

Need to demonstrate the competency of our graduates

Increased competition

Funding shifts threatening access and affordability

Public perception of the quality of a MnSCU education

employers and the public will continue to seek proof on the quality of our graduates
Employers and the public will continue to seek proof on the quality of our graduates

January 23, 2012

Beware: Alternative Certification Is Coming

February 7, 2013

American Council on Education Recommends 5 MOOCs for Credit

February 11, 2013

Colleges Ask Government to Clarify Rules for Credit Based on Competency

March 19, 2013

Student Aid Can Be Awarded for 'Competencies,' Not Just Credit Hours, U.S. Says

August 12, 2013

Education Department Approves Competency-Based Program at Capella U.

critical challenge s1
Critical Challenges

Changing students

Changing technology

Changing nature of work

Need to demonstrate the competency of our graduates

Increased competition

Funding shifts threatening access and affordability

Public perception of the quality of a MnSCU education

mnscu enrollment has grown by 18 over the last decade
MnSCU enrollment has grown by 18% over the last decade…

Source: MnSCU Office of Institutional Research

but mnscu s market share has been declining
…but, MnSCU’s market share has been declining

Source: Minnesota Office of Higher Education

over the last decade enrollment in the for profits has soared
Over the last decade enrollment in the for-profits has soared

Source: Minnesota Office of Higher Education

critical challenges3
Critical Challenges

Changing students

Changing technology

Changing nature of work

Need to demonstrate the competency of our graduates

Increased competition

Funding shifts threaten access and affordability

Public perception of the quality of a MnSCU education

deep cuts in state support
Deep cuts in state support…

Source: MnSCU Office of Institutional Research

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…have led to increased reliance on tuition and rising student debt, which threatens access and affordability

Source: MnSCU Office of Institutional Research

the dangers of inaction
The dangers of inaction

Source: MnSCU Office of Institutional Research

critical challenges4
Critical Challenges

Changing students

Changing technology

Changing nature of work

Need to demonstrate the competency of our graduates

Increased competition

Funding shifts threaten access and affordability

Public perception of the quality of a MnSCU education

current public perceptions
Current public perceptions

The perception of educational quality is mixed.

Retention and completion rates are an issue

Students value quality and transfer and rank us as underperforming in these areas.

We have no tradition of jointly telling our story, marketing our academic programs or recruiting students.

collective strengths we can leverage
Collective strengths we can leverage

We can not solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.

– Albert Einstein

leverage our c ollective s trengths
Leverage our collectivestrengths
  • We serve all Minnesotans
  • We provide a broad range of educational programs
  • We provide an extraordinary education
  • We meet Minnesota’s workforce needs
  • We are affordable and accessible
u nrealized opportunities
Unrealized opportunities
  • Share resources to produce economies of scale
  • Improve quality and transfer across multiple institutions through collaborating on program and course development
  • Leverage expertise of faculty and staff to scale educational best practices
  • Prove the capabilities of our graduates
  • Do a better job telling the story about the quality of a MnSCU education
  • Utilize faculty and staff expertise to provide customized training and continuing education programs to businesses and communities not currently being served
u nrealized opportunities1
Unrealized opportunities
  • Serve the 124,040that are currently attending the for-profit colleges and universities
  • Serve the 19,444 Minnesota high school graduates who do not enroll in post-secondary education after high school graduation and the 12,760Minnesota high school graduates who leave the state every fall to attend colleges and universities elsewhere
  • Retain the 20,313degree seeking students who drop out the following fall
slide33

Strategic Framework for Minnesota State Colleges and Universities

  • Minnesota State Colleges and Universities play an essential role in growing Minnesota’s economy and opening the doors of educational opportunity to all of Minnesotans. To that end, we will:
  • Ensure access to an extraordinary education for all Minnesotans
  • Our faculty and staff will provide the best education available in Minnesota, preparing graduates to lead in every sector of Minnesota’s economy.
  • We will continue to be the place of opportunity, making education accessible to all Minnesotans who seek a college, technical or university education; those who want to update their skills; and those who need to prepare for new careers.
  • Be the partner of choice to meet Minnesota’s workforce and community needs
  • Our colleges and universities will be the partner of choice for businesses and communities across Minnesota to help them solve real-world problems and keep Minnesotans at the leading edge of their professions.
  • Our faculty and staff will enable Minnesota to meet its need for a substantially better educated workforce by increasing the number of Minnesotans who complete certificates, diplomas and degrees.
  • Deliver to students, employers, communities and taxpayers the highest value / most affordable option
  • Our colleges and universities will deliver the highest value to students, employers, communities and taxpayers.
  • We will be the highest value / most affordable higher education option.
much great work is already underway e g
Much great work is already underway. E.g.:

“Extraordinary education” initiatives

Development of learning outcomes for all programs

Aggressive diversity goals and initiatives

Regional academic partnerships

Better alignment between secondary and post-secondary education

Campus Service Cooperative

Strategies to increase retention and completion as well as ease transfer of credit

Efforts to align academic programs with workforce needs

draft recommended strategies for our future
Draft recommended strategies for our future

Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

– Albert Einstein

possible criteria for evaluating the draft recommendations
Possible criteria for evaluating the draft recommendations

Is it better for students?

Does it advance our partnerships with businesses and communities?

Is it a good stewardship of our resources?

Is it fair to our employees?

Does it help address the challenges we face?

recommended guiding principle
Recommended guiding principle

“Transform Minnesota State Colleges and Universities to better meet the needs of our students, our community partners and our state by:

  • Forging deeper collaborations among our colleges and universities and system office.
  • Fully leveraging our collective strengths, resources and human capital.”

– Charting the Future draft report

recommended strategic p riorities
Recommended strategic priorities

Better align our program offerings and services to state, workforce and learner needs by developing and implementing a statewide academic plan and a statewide master facilities plan.

Certify the competencies our graduates have mastered.

Increase access to our colleges and universities and accelerate the educational success of diverse students.

Create a comprehensive, statewide e-education strategy.

Deliver leading edge continuing education and customized training to students and employers through statewide collaboration.

Enable recommended strategic priorities to be realized by redesigning the system’s financial and governance model.

next steps to revised draft of charting the future
Next steps to revised draft of Charting the Future

Broad consultation June 19, 2013-October 14, 2013

Reconvening of the strategic workgroup in October to share feedback and set the context of the revised version of Charting the Future

Revised draft of Charting the Future presented to the Board for their consideration October 25, 2013