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Hong Kong People ’ s Participation in Gambling Activities (2005) PowerPoint Presentation
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Hong Kong People ’ s Participation in Gambling Activities (2005)

Hong Kong People ’ s Participation in Gambling Activities (2005)

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Hong Kong People ’ s Participation in Gambling Activities (2005)

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  1. Hong Kong People’s Participation in Gambling Activities (2005) Prepared for Home Affairs Bureau by Social Sciences Research Centre The University of Hong Kong

  2. The Survey • Population Survey • Survey Period: March to April 2005 • Survey Coverage: Persons aged 15-64 in all domestic households in Hong Kong (excluding domestic helpers) • Sample Size: 2093 • Survey Method: Telephone interviews • Response Rate: 74.7% or 32.4% (including non-contacts) • Margin of Error of Key Statistics: +/-2.1% at 95% confidence level

  3. The Survey • Youth Survey • Survey Period: April to May 2005 • Survey Coverage: 48 classes from 14 secondary schools, 23 classes from VTC • Sample Size: 2095 • Survey Method: Self-administered questionnaires

  4. Population Survey results

  5. Participation in gambling activities Base: N=2093

  6. Amount spent on legal and illegal gambling per month

  7. Gambling risk Base: n=1328 Base: n=1188 Note: 63.7% of respondents had children

  8. Age of first gambling experience for gamblers Base: n=1679

  9. Who invited/persuaded to participate in first gambling Base: n=1720

  10. Reasons for participating in first gambling Base: n=1865

  11. Income spent on betting Base: n=1543

  12. Awareness of the preventive and remedial measures to address gambling related problems Base: N=2093

  13. Type of measures Base: n=850

  14. Problem & Pathological gambling • 2.2% of respondents indicated that they had experienced five or more of the problems covered by the DSM-IV and can be classified as “probable pathological gamblers” • 3.1% of respondents indicated that they had experienced three or four of the problems covered by the DSM-IV and can be classified as “probable problem gamblers” • Most of the identified “probable pathological gamblers” said they experienced the DSM-IV problems when betting on Horse Racing, Football Betting, Casino (Macau) and Social Gambling Note: DSM-IV is a clinical tool, not a screening tool

  15. Problem & Pathological gambling • 1.1% of respondents could be classified as pathological gamblers by Dr Leung’s screen • 3.2% of respondents could be classified as problem gamblers by Dr Leung’s screen

  16. Overall comparison with 2001 –Population Survey

  17. Participation in gambling activities (last year) compared with 2001

  18. Participation in gambling activities (last year) compared with 2001

  19. Amount spent on gambling activities (per month) * More than 30% of respondents (Mark in Red) 20% - 30% of respondents (Mark in Blue)

  20. Youth Survey results(Secondary schools + VTC)

  21. Participation in gambling activities in the past year

  22. Amount spent on gambling activities in the past year

  23. Age of first gambling experience for gamblers Base: n=329

  24. Who invited/persuaded to participate in first gambling Base: n=661

  25. Reasons for participating in first gambling Base: n=659

  26. Reasons for continuing to gamble Base: n=565

  27. Age of first football betting experience for soccer gamblers Base: n=68

  28. Channels to place the bet of first football betting Base: n=113

  29. Who invited/persuaded to participate in first football betting Base: n=115

  30. Reasons for participating in first football betting Base: n=114

  31. Reasons for continuing to gamble on football game Base: n=114

  32. Channels to place the bet * * More than 50% of respondents (Mark in Red) 20% - 50% of respondents (Mark in Blue)

  33. Respondents’ attitude towards gambling

  34. Respondents’ attitude towards gambling Base: aged 12 – 13 (355) / aged 14 – 15 (408) / aged 16 – 17 (269) / aged 18 – 19 (162)

  35. Media influence on gambling Media coverage of different gambling activities - Base: aged 12 – 13 (583) / aged 14 – 15 (647) / aged 16 – 17 (486) / aged 18 – 19 (223)

  36. Media influence on gambling Media coverage of different gambling activities - Base: aged 12 – 13 (583) / aged 14 – 15 (647) / aged 16 – 17 (486) / aged 18 – 19 (223)

  37. Media influence on gambling Media coverage of different gambling activities - Base: aged 12 – 13 (583) / aged 14 – 15 (647) / aged 16 – 17 (486) / aged 18 – 19 (223)

  38. Media influence on gambling HKJC’s promotions (e.g. carnivals, Open Day, etc.) on different kinds of different gambling activities - Base: aged 12 – 13 (583) / aged 14 – 15 (647) / aged 16 – 17 (486) / aged 18 – 19 (223)

  39. Media influence on gambling HKJC’s promotions (e.g. carnivals, Open Day etc.) on different kinds of different gambling activities - Base: aged 12 – 13 (583) / aged 14 – 15 (647) / aged 16 – 17 (486) / aged 18 – 19 (223)

  40. Problem & Pathological gambling(Students aged 12-19 of secondary schools only) • 1.3% of respondents indicated that they had experienced five or more of the problems covered by the DSM-IV and can be classified as “probable pathological gamblers” • 1.3% of respondents indicated that they had experienced three or four of the problems covered by the DSM-IV and can be classified as “probable problem gamblers” • Most of the identified “probable pathological gamblers” said they experienced the DSM-IV problems when betting on Mark Six, Football Betting, Social Gambling and cussec Note: DSM-IV is a clinical tool, not a screening tool

  41. Problem & Pathological gambling(secondary schools + VTC) • 1.3% of respondents could be classified as pathological gamblers by Dr Leung’s screen • 0.8% of respondents could be classified as problem gamblers by Dr Leung’s screen

  42. Awareness of preventive and remedial measures to address gambling related problems Base: n=2019

  43. Type of measures Base: n=790

  44. Family’s reactions to participation in gambling activities Base: n=679 (who had participated in any gambling activities within last year)

  45. Comparison with 2001– Youth Survey

  46. Participation in gambling activities as compared with 2001 – Mark Six (secondary schools only) Base: 2005 survey  Aged 12-13 (284) / Aged 14-15 (514) / Aged 16-17 (465) / Aged 18-19 (233) 2001 survey  Aged 12-13 (271) / Aged 14-15 (825) / Aged 16-17 (754) / Aged 18-19 (150)

  47. Participation in gambling activities as compared with 2001 – Horse Racing (HKJC) (secondary schools only) Base: 2005 survey  Aged 12-13 (284) / Aged 14-15 (514) / Aged 16-17 (465) / Aged 18-19 (233) 2001 survey  Aged 12-13 (271) / Aged 14-15 (825) / Aged 16-17 (754) / Aged 18-19 (150)

  48. Participation in gambling activities as compared with 2001 – Football Betting (secondary schools only) Base: 2005 survey  Aged 12-13 (284) / Aged 14-15 (514) / Aged 16-17 (465) / Aged 18-19 (233) 2001 survey  Aged 12-13 (271) / Aged 14-15 (825) / Aged 16-17 (754) / Aged 18-19 (150)

  49. Participation in gambling activities as compared with 2001 – Social Gambling (secondary schools only) Base: 2005 survey  Aged 12-13 (284) / Aged 14-15 (514) / Aged 16-17 (465) / Aged 18-19 (233) 2001 survey  Aged 12-13 (271) / Aged 14-15 (825) / Aged 16-17 (754) / Aged 18-19 (150)

  50. Amount spent on gambling as compared with 2001 (underage secondary school students only)