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imagery - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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imagery. What is an image? An image is a word or phrase that appeals to one of our senses. Imagery helps us to Create a mental picture Hear a sound Feel a texture or temperature Taste a sweet, salty, or sour flavor. Imagery can…. Speak to our deepest feelings—joy, sorrow, wonder, love

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imagery
imagery
  • What is an image?
  • An imageis a word or phrase that appeals to one of our senses.
  • Imagery helps us to
    • Create a mental picture
    • Hear a sound
    • Feel a texture or temperature
    • Taste a sweet, salty, or sour flavor
imagery can
Imagery can…
  • Speak to our deepest feelings—joy, sorrow, wonder, love
  • Emphasize certain qualities of the subject
  • Create a mood
voice in written speeches
VOICE IN WRITTEN SPEECHES
  • Punctuation and text features can be used to enhance a speaker’s meaning and purpose.
  • Examples???
  • Bold font, underlining, italics, CAPITALIZATION,ellipses…, exclamation point!, dash--, (parentheses), “quotation marks”
examples of spoken voice in written speeches
Examples of spoken voice in written speeches
  • We have come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.
    • Gestures—pointing or hand movements
    • Facial expressions
  • The Negro still is not “free!”
    • Articulation—draw attention to a word by the precision of its delivery
  • It came as a JOYOUS daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.
    • Pitch—change of voice from high to low OR from low to high
examples of spoken voice in written speeches1
Examples of spoken voice in written speeches
  • The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. They have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone.
    • Speed—pacing of 140-160 words a minute is normal.
    • A short sentence after a series of longer sentences adds emphasis and drama
  • All men are created…equal. OR All men are created—equal.
    • Pauses emphasize a certain word or idea.
examples of spoken voice in written speeches2
Examples of spoken voice in written speeches
  • FREE AT LAST! Free at last!
    • Volume—project voice louder or reduce voice to a whisper
  • Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado! Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California! But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia! Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee!
    • Quality—show of emotion or enthusiasm to indicate passion.
  • Variance—combine all delivery elements in an effective way to maintain variety. Never go more than one paragraph without variance, but don’t overdo it either.
what concern are we appealing to
What concern are we appealing to?
  • In a sense we have come to our nation's capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.
  • JUSTICE/FAIRNESS
what concern are we appealing to1
What concern are we appealing to?
  • It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro's legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. 1963 is not an end, but a beginning. Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual.
  • SAFETY
what concern are we appealing to2
What concern are we appealing to?
  • I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification; one day right there in Alabama, little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.
  • ETHICS—RIGHT VS. WRONG
persuasive versus informative writing
Persuasive versus Informative writing

While persuasive writing seeks to present two sides to an argument and prove that one option is better than the other, informative writing focuses on facts and rarely mentions the writer’s opinion. Information must be:

  • Accurate—Check your facts and use reliable sources for research.
  • Significant—Is it important? Does it make a difference?
  • Interpreted fairly—Are there other sides to the issue?