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  1. CAREER PLANNING IN CANADIAN LABOUR MARKET WITH A SASKATCHEWAN FOCUS FEBRUARY 25, 2012 Mike O. Luti

  2. Outline • Definition • Individual Career Planning Process – Model • Self assessment; • Academic/ career options; • Relevant/ practical experience; and • Job search. • Labour Market • Where Saskatchewan Visible Minorities fit in the equation?

  3. What is Career Planning? • A systematic process by which an individual selects her/his career goals and path to achieve these goals. E.g. occupation of nursing. • “An individually perceived sequence of attitudes and behaviours associated with work related experiences and activities over the span of the person’s life.”- Douglas T. Hall (1976). • “A career planning is a sequence of separate but related work activities that provide continuity, order and meaning to a person’s life.” – Edwin B. Flippo (1984).

  4. Career Planning- An ongoing process • Explore interests and abilities. • Plan career goals. • Match personal goals and opportunities. • Create future work success. • Build bridges- current to next job/career. • Need for flexibility.

  5. Steps in Individual Career Planning Who am I? How do I get there? Where am I going?

  6. Individual Career Planning Process

  7. Self Assessment • Interrelationship between self and occupational choices. • How: • Interests, abilities, skills and work values; • Physical and psychological needs; • Aspirations and motivational level; and • Personal traits and characteristics.

  8. Self Assessment contd. • Competency areas: • Gaining self-awareness; • Improve self-confidence; • Understand time and stress management; and • Develop personal/professional management skills.

  9. Academic/ Career Options • Understand work in depth and narrow to specific occupation. • How: • Academic and career entrance; • Education and training; • Skills and experience; • Academic and career alternatives; and • Job market trends.

  10. Academic/ Career Options contd. • Competency areas: • Gain research and investigative skills; • Practice decision-making, problem-solving and critical thinking skills; and • Increase understanding of how abilities, interests, and values match career/academic requirements.

  11. Relevant/ Practical Experience • Gain practical experience through internships, cooperatives, education. • How: • New skills and diverse experiences; • Organization to volunteer for; • Likes and dislikes of skills, work values and environments; and • Additional/different course work or skills.

  12. Relevant/ Practical Experience contd. • Competency areas: • Cultural diversity; • Ethical behaviour; • Supervisory/ leadership/ teamwork skills; • Work related, transferable skills; and • Conflict resolution skills.

  13. Job Search • Develop self-marketing skills to help implement your career goals. • How: • Resume and cover letter preparation; • Job search strategies; • Interview skills; and • Narrow choices.

  14. Job Search contd. • Competency areas: • Correspondence ability; • Verbal communication; • Networking, problem-solving and decision-making; and • Budgeting skills.

  15. Career Planning is NOT… • Leaving the decision to chance. • Getting information and never deciding. • Going along with someone else’s plans.

  16. Saskatchewan Visible Minorities • Population by age group; • Labour force by educational levels; • Labour force by sex; • Employment rates; • Unemployment rates; and • Employment difficulties encountered.

  17. Population by Age Group • Visible minority population relatively young compared with Saskatchewan as a whole. • Over 60% are 15 to 54 years of age compared with 55% of the provincial population. • Very few (7%) are 65 or older compared with 16% of the provincial population.

  18. Labour force by Educational Levels • Completed education levels are higher in the visible minority population than in the rest of Saskatchewan population. • Over one-third have a university certificate or degree. • Visible minority have lower proportion of population without university level education than in the general population.

  19. Labour force by Sex • No significant improvement in the labour force. • More male population in the labour force compared with female population.

  20. Employment Rates • Employment rate differential has not changed between 1996 and 2006. • Employment rates for visible minority aged 25 to 54 are lower than for the rest of the SK population.

  21. Unemployment Rates • Unemployment rates for population aged 25 to 54 years declined between 1996 and 2006. • Unemployment rate for visible minority was lower than the rest of SK population in 2006.

  22. Unemployment Rates by Sex • Unemployment rates for population aged 25 to 54 years for both sexes declined between 1996 and 2006. • Generally, female unemployment rates lower than for males except in 2006.

  23. Employment Difficulties Encountered

  24. QUESTIONS

  25. Thank you