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South East Australian Transport Strategy Inc. Freight and your community. David Coonan National Manager Policy Australian Trucking Association 21 May 2010. Australian Trucking Association. National peak body unites entire trucking industry. single, authoritative voice.

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South East Australian Transport Strategy Inc. Freight and your community


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    1. South East Australian Transport Strategy Inc. Freight and your community David Coonan National Manager Policy Australian Trucking Association 21 May 2010

    2. Australian Trucking Association • National peak body • unites entire trucking industry. • single, authoritative voice. • not funded by government. • Members are state and sectoral trucking associations (such as NatRoad), TWU and national companies. • Aim – A safer and more efficient industry.

    3. What people think about the trucking industry • According to an Austroads survey: • 79 per cent of Australians think large trucks are a major or minor concern. • 44 per cent think there are too many trucks. • 18 per cent say they experience trucks exceeding the speed limit or tailgating on a daily basis.

    4. But it’s not all bad… • 81 per cent of Australians agree that trucks are really important to the economy. • 61 per cent that ‘we need to put up with trucks because there is no real alternative’. • 55 per cent believe that truck drivers are more tolerant and less aggressive than car drivers.

    5. Your community • Is concerned about: • Road safety. • Amenity. • Environment. • Costs of living in the area. • Wants: • A good lifestyle. • High quality services. • Convenient shopping. • Lean local costs.

    6. Community goods and services • Food = delivery trucks. • Building materials = delivery trucks. • Basic Services = service trucks. • Consumer goods = delivery trucks. • Health services = delivery trucks. • Council services = council trucks. • Employment = truck dependency.

    7. Conclusion • Trucks are necessary for our community’s existence. • Even rail needs trucks to function.

    8. Measuring truck impacts • Safety exposure and amenity = Number of trips per 1000 tonnes. • Energy consumption = fuel used to move 1000 tonnes on a 1000 kilometres lead. • Cost of trucks using local roads = Road wear per 1000 tonnes. • Road wear can be measured in terms of equivalent standards axles (ESA).

    9. The Road Ahead • We’re doing this in part through a $1.3 million travelling exhibition • Sponsored by industry

    10. Common council & service trucks Three axle rigid trucks up to 22.5 tonnes gross mass. Two axle rigid trucks up to 15 tonnes gross mass.

    11. Two axle truck impacts Number of trips per 1000 tonnes = 143. ESA’s per 1000 tonnes = 490. Fuel required to move 1000 tonnes 1000kms = 6578.

    12. Three axle truck impacts Number of trips per 1000 tonnes = 74. ESA’s per 1000 tonnes = 347. Fuel required to move 1000 tonnes 1000kms = 4144.

    13. Truck and Dog impacts Number of trips per 1000 tonnes = 30. ESA’s per 1000 tonnes = 201. Fuel required to move 1000 tonnes 1000kms = 3060.

    14. Six axle Semi Trailer impacts- at general mass limits Number of trips per 1000 tonnes = 42. ESA’s per 1000 tonnes = 257. Fuel required to move 1000 tonnes 1000kms = 3948.

    15. Six axle Semi Trailer impacts- at higher mass limits with road friendly suspension Number of trips per 1000 tonnes = 37. ESA’s per 1000 tonnes = 226. Fuel required to move 1000 tonnes 1000kms = 3700.

    16. B-double impacts- at general mass limits Number of trips per 1000 tonnes = 26. ESA’s per 1000 tonnes = 195. Fuel required to move 1000 tonnes 1000kms = 3224.

    17. B-double impacts- at higher mass limits with road friendly suspension Number of trips per 1000 tonnes = 23. ESA’s per 1000 tonnes = 173. Fuel required to move 1000 tonnes 1000kms = 2990.

    18. B-triple impacts Number of trips per 1000 tonnes = 17. ESA’s per 1000 tonnes = 152. Fuel required to move 1000 tonnes 1000kms = 2448.

    19. Type one road train impacts Number of trips per 1000 tonnes = 21. ESA’s per 1000 tonnes = 202. Fuel required to move 1000 tonnes 1000kms = 2856.

    20. AB-triple impacts Number of trips per 1000 tonnes = 16. ESA’s per 1000 tonnes = 176. Fuel required to move 1000 tonnes 1000kms = 2400.

    21. BAB-quad impacts Number of trips per 1000 tonnes = 13. ESA’s per 1000 tonnes = 161. Fuel required to move 1000 tonnes 1000kms = 2106.

    22. In comparison:

    23. In comparison:

    24. High productivity vehicles • More than one-third of the freight task undertaken by the trucking industry is interstate. • The interstate non-bulk freight task is growing rapidly, at about four per cent per year. • At this rate, interstate non-bulk freight will double in about 18 years. • Moreover, interstate non-bulk road freight is growing even more rapidly.[1] [1] Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics, 2006, Freight Measurement and Modelling in Australia.

    25. Safety versus vehicle configuration

    26. Modular vehicles

    27. Modular high productivity vehicles • Modular combinations can disconnect into sub units. • for example a B-triple can:

    28. Conclusion • The alternative to safer more productive trucks, is more and more smaller trucks and therefore more damage with an associated and unacceptable escalation of road safety risks. • This is not a community acceptable outcome

    29. Conclusion • We are asking local government to work with industry to get the right answers for your community. • At the request of some NSW shires we are planning another hands on demonstration day similar to the one held at Narrandera – let me know if you are interested in attending. • Dubbo 21 June 2010 • Moree 2 August 2010

    30. Thank you