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Lean Practitioner Session 1 Presented by the DPS Continuous Improvement Team

Lean Practitioner Session 1 Presented by the DPS Continuous Improvement Team

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Lean Practitioner Session 1 Presented by the DPS Continuous Improvement Team

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  1. Lean Practitioner Session 1Presented by the DPS Continuous Improvement Team SBOE – ’13-’14 School Year

  2. Context • Provide tools for SBOE projects • Provide support and mentoring during projects • Ensure projects are complete and sustainable • Prepare for Aspen Challenge

  3. Introductions • Veronica Bradsby • Kathryn McIver • Joy Peak • Katie Wolters

  4. Mentor Assignments • Veronica Bradsby • West, North, Lincoln, Bruce Randolph • Kathryn McIver • South, JFK, CLA, TJ • Joy Peak • East, DCIS, DSA • Katie Wolters • George Washington, CEC, Montbello, MLK

  5. Goals • Write a problem statement • Complete a scoping document • Complete a project charter • Assign follow-up tasks GOAL

  6. Roles • CI Mentors • Share expertise of CI tools • Act as neutral facilitators • Keep teams on track to achieve goals • School Teams • Participate and ask questions • Work toward project goals

  7. Agenda • Introduction to CI • Review of tonight’s tools • Project Work • Problem Statement • Project Scoping • Project Charter • Follow up tasks • Closing

  8. Please… • Use technology for note-taking if you wish, but refrain from other technological tasks during our time together • Silence cell phones • Assume positive intent • Ask questions! (If you’re wondering, others are as well)

  9. Continuous Improvement at DPS Continuous Improvement Team Mission: lkfjasl;kfjal;sdkfja;lsdkfj Mentor, Educate and Support the schools and departments of DPS. Generate Cost Savings Every Child Succeeds Increase Efficiency Improve Services Continuous improvement methodologies: Lean, Agile, and Lean Six Sigma

  10. Lean Practitioner? • This year you will be able to complete a Lean Practitioner Certification. • Eliminate Waste • Increase Efficiency • Save Time • Save Money • Lead Continuous Improvement Projects

  11. What will I Learn? • You will… • Learn how to identify and scope Continuous Improvement Projects • Learn how to use Lean tools • Learn how to implement and sustain your solutions • Learn how to apply Lean tools in a variety of settings

  12. Will I use what I learn? • Once you’ve earned your Lean Practitioner Certification you will have the skills necessary to complete additional projects • In your school • In the district • At home • Almost anywhere!

  13. How do we start? • Concept • Investigate • Design • Perform • Sustain This is also known as DMAIC

  14. Problem Statement • Your problem statement should clearly communicate information essential to the project.

  15. What • What is the problem? Customers are unhappy with our pizza delivery.

  16. Where? • Where does the problem occur? Customers who have pizza delivered from our Elm St. location are unhappy.

  17. When • When did the problem start? Has it always existed? Is there a pattern? Customers who have had pizza delivered from our Elm St. location since May are unhappy.

  18. How extensive? • Complaints have increased 25%. Customers who have had pizza delivered from our Elm St. location since May are unhappy. Complaints in that time have increased 25%.

  19. How do you know? • We know there must be a problem because other locations have not seen an increase in the number of complaints. Customers who have had pizza delivered from our Elm St. location since May are unhappy. Complaints in that time have increased 25%, while our other locations have seen no change

  20. Problem Statement Putting it all together… • What? • Where? • When? • How much? • How do you know? Customers who have had pizza delivered from our Elm St. location since May are unhappy. Complaints in that time have increased 25%, while our other locations have seen no change

  21. Exercise • Take a few minutes to write your problem statement • Having trouble? Ask one of our CI mentors

  22. Problem Statement Remember… • What? • Where? • When? • How much? • How do you know? Customers who have had pizza delivered from our Elm St. location since May are unhappy. Complaints in that time have increased 25%, while our other locations have seen no change

  23. Share Out • Would anyone like to share the problem statement for your project?

  24. Scope • What do we mean by scope?

  25. Scope • Defines the boundaries of a project. • Keep goals specific • It is okay to consider some things out of scope! • 9th Graders vs. ALL students • Unexcused absences during 1st period vs. ALL absences

  26. Scope • Avoid “Scope Creep” • Do not allow your project to grow uncontrollably. Record additional ideas and use them for future projects.

  27. Scope • Remember – A problem can appear to be the size of an elephant. Control your scope. It’s far easier to eat an elephant one bite at a time! • http://timemanagementninja.com/2011/01/how-to-eat-an-elephant-in-10-minutes/

  28. Scoping Document

  29. Project Name • Give a name that communicates the intent of your project. Apple Orange

  30. Executive Sponsor • Role: • Own the vision, direction, integration and results of the project • Lead the culture change • Responsibilities: • Ensure the CI project goals are linked to district goals • Maintain linkage between business strategy and selected projects • The Executive Sponsor’s support of the project sets the stage for the success of the project • Understand, at a high level, the progress of team activities • Pitfalls: • A project that is not clearly supported by the Executive Sponsor is unlikely to be successful.

  31. Department • For all SBOE projects, your ‘Department’ will be your school.

  32. Date Completed • Today is: September 18, 2013 September 18

  33. Your Turn

  34. Context and Purpose • Describe the business problem that is driving the project. • This will be the problem statement you already created! • Tell why the project is important and how it fits into the bigger picture. • Add a comment to your problem statement telling WHY it’s important to solve the problem.

  35. Context and Purpose • Example: • Customers who have had pizza delivered from our Elm St. location since May are unhappy. Complaints in that time have increased 25%, while our other locations have seen no change in customer satisfaction. This is concerning because we have noticed a drop in the number of delivery orders at our Elm St. location.

  36. Your Turn

  37. Goal(s) of the Project • S.M.A.R.T. goals are important.

  38. Goal(s) of the Project • Specific– The project scope needs to be accurate and leave no doubt as to what the project will achieve. • Measurable– How will you know when the project is complete? • Attainable & Actionable– Make the project as small as possible. Remember eating the elephant. It is far easier to manage a few smaller projects than one big one. A good goal statement will include an action word. • Realistic– Make the project easy to deliver, if it is over complicated then it is likely to hit problems. • Timely– Does the project have to be complete by a certain date? If so put it in the scope that the project has to be complete by that date.

  39. Goal(s) of the Project • Our goal is to decrease the number of unsatisfied delivery customers per quarter at the Elm St. location of Mr. Pizza by 30%, from 10 to 7 per month, as measured by the number of in-person, telephone, or electronically submitted complaints by the end of December, 2013.

  40. Your Turn

  41. Expected Benefits • Summarize the benefits you expect to achieve as a result of completing your project. • How will you measure success?

  42. Expected Benefits • By completing this project we anticipate increased customer satisfaction as evidenced by decreased complaints and increased numbers of delivery orders at the Elm St. location or Mr. Pizza.

  43. Signature • Make sure you have the full support of your executive sponsor. Share the Scoping Template with them and obtain their signature.

  44. Your Turn

  45. You’ve scoped your project!

  46. Digging Deeper • The next step is to expand the Scoping Document into a Charter. • A well-written charter can serve as a communication tool to ensure everyone involved with the project understands key information including scope and goals.

  47. Start at the Beginning • Take a look at the top of the charter. • The first 3 entries come from the Scoping Template. Let’s look at the other roles…

  48. Project Champion Role: • Determine the scope of the CI project • Leader who is most familiar with the benefits of the project and accepts ultimate responsibility for the success of the project Responsibilities: • Assist the team to overcome roadblocks that come up during the project • Evaluate and accept project deliverables and benefits • Understand, at a high level, the progress of team activities • Identify areas of concern to the Process Owner and CI Facilitator • Report project activity to the Executive Sponsor Pitfalls: • If Champions are not actively driving project results and future project identification, CI will struggle in the organization.

  49. Project Champion • Who is your Project Champion? • Take a moment to discuss in your teams. • What makes them the right person? Our Project Champion will be the regional manager for Mr. Pizza. She regularly reviews the data for all of the Mr. Pizza locations in the area.

  50. Process Owner Role: • Project leader and change agent for a process that they are responsible for or have an interest in. Responsibilities: • Lead the team members through the CI process • Schedule and lead team meetings and reviews • Complete a Project Charter to identify tangible results that the project will deliver • Follow up with team members on action items and project tasks to ensure timely completion • Assist the team in the implementation of the identified solution(s) • Work with the Champion to ensure the project is meeting expected outcomes • Accept responsibility for maintaining the improved process Pitfalls: • If the process owner is not engaged throughout the project, they are unlikely to accept the solution and responsibility for maintaining improvements when the project is over.