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The Friendship Centre Movement Creating Opportunity for Canadian Urban Aboriginal Peoples. FIESS October 1 9, 2011 Montreal, QC. National Association of Friendship Centres 275 MacLaren Street Ottawa, Ontario K2P 0L9 www.nafc.ca. Who are We?.

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the friendship centre movement creating opportunity for canadian urban aboriginal peoples

The Friendship Centre MovementCreating Opportunity for Canadian Urban Aboriginal Peoples

FIESS

October 19, 2011

Montreal, QC

National Association of Friendship Centres

275 MacLaren Street

Ottawa, Ontario

K2P 0L9

www.nafc.ca

who are we
Who are We?

The National Association of Friendship Centres is a national, non-profit Aboriginal organization that represents the views and concerns of 119 Friendship Centres and 7 Provincial/Territorial Associations (PTAs) across Canada.

Mission Statement

To improve the quality of life for Aboriginal peoples in an urban environment by supporting self-determined activities which encourage equal access to, and participation in, Canadian Society; and which respect and strengthen the increasing emphasis on Aboriginal cultural distinctiveness.

history
History

Friendship Centre Time Line

1950’s Friendship Centres established in Toronto (1951), Vancouver (1952) and Winnipeg (1959)

1968 Friendship Centre Steering Committee established to examine the feasibility of establishing a national body to represent the growing number of Centres

1972 National Association of Friendship Centres is incorporated and the Government of Canada implements the Migrating Native Peoples Program, providing funding to Friendship Centres across Canada

1988 The Aboriginal Friendship Centre Program (AFCP) secured permanent funding status

1996 Department of Canadian Heritage transfers administrative responsibility of the AFCP to the NAFC - 114 Friendship Centres across Canada

2011 119 Friendship Centres across Canada

2006 population statistics canada
2006 PopulationStatistics Canada
  • In 2006 according to the Canadian Census there were 1,273,000 Aboriginal people in Canada;
  • The Aboriginal population made up 3.8% of the total Canadian population up from 3.5% in 2001;
  • The Aboriginal population has grown faster than the non-Aboriginal population. Between 1996 and 2006, it increased 45%, nearly six times faster than the 8% rate of growth for the non-Aboriginal population over the same period;
urban aboriginal growth
Urban Aboriginal Growth
  • Canada’s Aboriginal population growing 6 times faster than non-Aboriginal population
  • 54% of all Aboriginal people live in urban areas;
    • One in 10 in Winnipeg;
    • 5% Edmonton;
    • 51% increase in population in Halifax since 2001 census;
  • 48% of the urban Aboriginal population is under the age of 25
labour market data
Labour Market Data*
  • The combined income of Aboriginal households, business and government sectors will reach $24 billion in 2011 and could eclipse $32 billion by 2016;
  • Many non-Aboriginal businesses already recognize the contribution that Aboriginal people can make to fill growing labour shortages, especially as the Canadian population ages;
  • There is less recognition of the fact that the Aboriginal segment of the overall population represents a rapidly growing consumer market and a potentially lucrative one for Canadian businesses.
  • *Source: ESTIMATING THE SIZE OF THE ABORIGINAL MARKET IN CANADA, TD Bank, 2011
challenges
CHALLENGES*
  • Still, one cannot overlook the significant challenges that remain:
  • The disparity in living standards relative to the Canadian average;
  • The most important impediment to closing the gap in living standards is the sub-par education attainment levels recorded by Aboriginal people;
  • *Source: ESTIMATING THE SIZE OF THE ABORIGINAL MARKET IN CANADA, TD Bank, 2011
challenges1
CHALLENGES*
  • e-learning programs and adult education programs are important steps in the right direction;
  • Policy makers in connection with businesses (Aboriginal peoples) and academics will need to think of inventive ways to educate individuals and communities;
  • Boosting education levels should be an important national priority.
  • *Source: ESTIMATING THE SIZE OF THE ABORIGINAL MARKET IN CANADA, TD Bank, 2011
nafc roles
NAFC ROLES
  • Work in partnership with its PTAs and member Friendship Centres to support the growth of urban economic opportunities throughout Canada;
  • Work in partnership with governments, Aboriginal economic development organizations and Aboriginal professional organizations to strengthen capacity;
  • Support educational and literacy opportunities for urban Aboriginal peoples;
  • To be the bridge between governments, Aboriginal business and professional organizations and mainstream businesses to the urban Aboriginal population.
woliwon thank you

Woliwon Thank You

For More Information:

Conrad Saulis,

Policy Director

(613) 563-4844 ext. 323

csaulis@nafc.ca

275 MacLaren Street

Ottawa, ON K2P 0L9

www.nafc.ca