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Constructed Response. Why?. BSSD 2008. BSSD 2009. BSSD 2009 Scores. One Site’s Scores. BSSD Site A. BSSD Site B. BSSD Site C. BSSD Site D. Why:. Why does it matter if I do well?. Why do Koyuk’s scores matter?. Why try to do better?. Why are we working on this now?. Overview.

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Why?

BSSD 2008

BSSD 2009


BSSD 2009 Scores

One Site’s Scores


BSSD Site A

BSSD Site B


BSSD Site C

BSSD Site D


Why:

  • Why does it matter if I do well?

  • Why do Koyuk’s scores matter?

  • Why try to do better?

  • Why are we working on this now?


Overview

  • Terms to Know

  • Writing CR Items

  • Sample CR Items

  • Resources


Terms

  • Constructed Response (CR) These items require students to generate (construct) an answer on their own, without options from which to choose. Students may be required to produce a response using words, pictures, diagrams or numbers.

    Short Response Open Ended Extended Response

  • Prompt This is the part of the item that presents the question(s) or tasks to be answered.

  • Rubric Rubrics present the criteria to be used in scoring the constructed-response item. Rubrics often include examples or acceptable answers.


Good Constructed Response Items:

  • Must be linked to the standards they assess

  • Cannot be answered with a simple yes or no

  • Based on topics accessible to students at that level

  • Require use of higher-order thinking skills

  • May have more than one correct answer

  • May have more than one way to find the correct answer

  • Contain clear and explicit directions for completing task


  • Explain how we use different forms of measurement in everyday life and why it’s important.

  • What is the most exciting part in the story? Explain why you think it is the most exciting part using details and /or examples from the story.

  • Classify the following numbers into three groups: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15. At the top of each group, write what the numbers have in common.



  • His mind kept wondering all by itself about the new school

  • year. There would be new Math, new English, new Social Studies,

  • and new Science. There would be a new schedule, and he would tape

  • it onto his new organizer and check it over and over again. How

  • does that go? A watched pot never boils? It’s something l like that.

  • A watched schedule never changes, either.

  • Something about this summer camp made him forget the things about school that he didn’t like so much. Sometimes a class would end before he understood what was going on. Sometimes 43 minutes left holes in lessons that could have been filled in 50 minutes or 120 minutes. That was the great thing about camp. He had as much time as he needed for everything he did there.

  • Prompt:

  • List two details from the passage that support the idea that time

  • was always on his mind.


  • Scoring: us.

    • 2 points- The response includes two of the following correct details:

    •  A watched pot never boils.

    •  A watched schedule never changes.

    •  Sometimes a class would end before he understood what was going on.

    • Sometimes 43 minutes left holes in lessons that could have been filled in 50 minutes or 120 minutes.

    • He had as much time as he needed for everything he did there.

    • 1 point-

    • Answer: Sometimes 43 minutes left holes in lessons that could have been filled in 50 or 120 minutes.

    • For this item, the response includes one of the correct details listed above with an incorrect or missing detail.

    • 0 points-

    • Answer: Summer camp made him forget things he didn’t like about school. His mind kept wondering about the new school year.

    • For this item, the response includes none of the correct details listed above. It is inaccurate, irrelevant, or blank.


    Sample CR Social Studies / Writing us.

    What do you think our country would be like if we didn’t have laws?

    Use examples to support your explanation.

    Value = 3 points

    Break down the prompt into parts:

    Restate the question with a statement of your idea.

    Give at least two examples that support your idea.


    Science us.

    Plants and animals have special adaptations that help them live in their environment. Discuss two special adaptations that plants and/or animals have for surviving in the arctic. (4 pts.)


    EED Formative Assessment Sampler Items us.

    [6] S&P-4 (L) Analyzing whether a game is mathematically fair

    or unfair by explaining the probability of all possible outcomes

    (M6.2.4)

    Helen and Anna are playing a spinner game. The spinner is divided

    into seven sections that are labeled 1-7. If the spinner lands on a number less than four, Helen wins. If the spinner lands on four or greater, Anna wins. Is this game fair? Explain your answer.

    [8] MEA-2 Using scale drawings involving indirect measurement (determining the scale factor and applying it to find missing dimension) (M2.3.4)

    Taipei, Taiwan, recently celebrated the official opening of the world’s tallest skyscraper. It is called “Taipei 101” because it has 101 floors or stories. The building is 1,679 feet tall. To the nearest hundredth, how tall is each story? Show your work.


    • PROMPT: us.

      • Pretend you're a cartoon character. What special powers would you have and what would you do with them?

    • Value = 3 points

    • Break down the prompt into parts:

    • Describe your character and special powers. (1 point)

    • Give at least two examples about what you would do with your powers. (2 points)


    Finally, us.

    • Find practice CR prompts to use with your classes. Practice scoring with the students often.

    • Write constructed response prompts for the content you are learning in class at least weekly.

    • Practice , practice, practice with students.

    • Share great examples of answers from your students.

    • Post constructed response answers up in the classroom and hallway.

    Make them feel successful!


    Resources us.

    THE WRITINGFIX CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE PAGE http://www.writingfix.com/RICA/Constructed_Response.htm

    ALASKA FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT RESOURCES

    http://www.eed.state.ak.us/tls/assessment/FormativeAssessmentResources.html

    EXAMPLES OF TOP QUALITY CR PROBLEMS

    http://sps.k12.mo.us/boyd/CR%20Top%20Quality/Quality%20CRs.pdf

    NAEP ASSESSMENT TOOLBOX FOR TEACHERS

    The NAEP Assessment Toolbox for Teachers is a collection of classroom activities using released questions from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP).

    http://www.eed.state.ak.us/tls/assessment/FormativeAssessmentResources.html

    NAEP SAMPLE QUESTIONS

    You can select the type and content to view many sample questions.

    http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/itmrls/startsearch.asp

    SAMPLE CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE MAEP

    https://www.msu.edu/~kingdoro/sample_constructed_responses.htm


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