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Social Media Ethics

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  1. Social Media Ethics SPJ Region 5 Spring Conference 2012 Mike Reilley and Amy Bartner

  2. Amy’s Case Studies

  3. Amy’s Case Studies

  4. Amy’s Case Studies

  5. Amy’s Case Studies

  6. Amy’s Case Studies

  7. Amy’s Case Studies

  8. Ethical Guidelines with Twitter • Consider everything public • Consider everything signed • Consider many accounts to be fake • Unless you know the person or know it’s his or her account • RTs can be endorsements • Storify on AP retweet guidelines • Check with your employer on policies for Tweeting • Internal issues can become external • Are opinions allowed?

  9. Be Careful With Twitter • This fake BBC News account tweeted false information … and look at all of the retweets.

  10. Think Spelling Doesn’t Matter? • ABC 7 Washington D.C.

  11. Verifying News on Twitter • How to verify? • Don’t trust anything you first read on Twitter • Know the sources (sources, not source) • Read the sources bio information • Take pause: click on the link, if there is one. Read the story. • Are other media outlets reporting it. • What attribution is there, if any? (if there is none, wait for some) • Play to your hunches: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is!

  12. Misreporting: Paterno’s Death • Student alternative news site @OnwardState tweeted that Paterno had died on Saturday night, basing it on an email to players • CBS Sports website posted a news story on Paterno’s death, basing it on the OnwardState tweet but not attributing it. • Several media outlets and journalists began tweeting that Paterno died Saturday night.

  13. OnwardState’s Tweet Link went here.

  14. Misreporting: Joe Paterno’s Death • CBSSports.com home page screengrab from Saturday night.

  15. Misreporting: Joe Paterno’s Death • Paterno’s family denied the rumor; son Jay tweeted that dad was alive. • @OnwardState ran a correction on its site and tweeted it quickly. • CBSSports.com added attribution to @OnwardState in its story only after the Paterno family denied rumor. • CBSSports.com managing editor wrote retraction and apology, but it took more than 90 minutes. • Later fired reporter-producer who posted the story without attribution.

  16. Lessons Learned • Fact-check on any story, but especially on sensitive stories such as a death. • Attribute everything and use links! • CBS Sports learned this! • First-hand knowledge/interview never can be replaced by social media. • Take pause before hitting the send button. Do we know it’s true?

  17. More Lessons Learned • Huffington Post got it wrong Saturday night. How it handled the correction.

  18. More Lessons Learned • Poynter: Craig Silverman on how getting it right is more important than getting it first. • Poynter: Jeff Sonderman on Paterno reporting gaffe. • Elana Zak’s Storify on how the events transpired.

  19. How Journalists Use Social Media

  20. How Journalists Use Social Media

  21. How Journalists Use Social Media

  22. Sources • Amy Gahran • Poynter Institute, E-media Tidbits • Maynard Institute • Why Journalists Shouldn’t Snicker About Twitter • MuckRack.com • PBS Newshour • The Poynter Institute • Steve Buttry • “Twitter for Journalists” • Used with permission • http://www.slideshare.net/stevebuttry/twitter-for-journalists-1702381