introduction n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Introduction PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Introduction

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 123

Introduction - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 132 Views
  • Uploaded on

Introduction. The ability to correctly evaluate a horse’s conformation and performance is an essential part of any equine program.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Introduction' - carr


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
introduction
Introduction
  • The ability to correctly evaluate a horse’s conformation and performance is an essential part of any equine program.
  • The correct evaluation of a class depends on the judge’s ability to properly assess and weigh all information and make sound decisions based on specific standards of excellence set forth by the different breed associations.
  • This information will give horsemen a better understanding of what the judge is looking for in the show ring, which could aid in the selection and training of horses.
oral reasons
ORAL REASONS
  • An oral set of reasons allows a student to defend their placing of the class within a 2-minute time limit.
  • This process will teach students how to think analytically, process information and then organize their thoughts into a logical order that can be presented orally in a refereed environment.
  • The criteria for preparing oral reasons include:
      • Organization
      • Content Accuracy
      • Content Relevancy
      • Terminology
      • Presentation
slide3
1) Organization
  • Logical order that is easy to follow.
  • Important points first.
  • Clear opening statements.

Introduction – Big Opening Statement

    • Class placing
    • Class name
    • Class description – How it was partitioned.
      • Designed to fit each particular class.
slide4
Body
  • Top, Middle and Bottom pair.
  • Miniature Opening Statement – Begin each pair with a brief sentence that describes, in general, the placing of the pair.
  • Grant – Comparable advantage of lower place horse.
  • Criticism – Specific description (Not Comparative) of individual.

Conclusion

  • Criticism of last placed horse.
  • Comparable disadvantages relative to other three horses.
slide5
2) Content Accuracy
  • TELL THE TRUTH.
  • Inaccurate statements are the major fault in reasons.
  • Complete content with appropriate faults and grants.
  • 1 pt deduction for leaving important point out.
  • 2 pt deduction for lying.

3) Content Relevancy

  • Reasons should contain only pertinent information.
  • Specific points of comparison that were significant in placing the pair.
  • Do not talk a “canned” set that does not fit the class.
slide6
4) Terminology
  • Proper grammar.
  • Comparative in pairs and grants.
  • Descriptive in criticisms.
  • Horsemanlike – Related to horse industry.
  • Clearly enunciated.
  • Correctly pronounced.

5) Presentation ( 2 minutes)

  • Professional appearance Proper volume
  • Poised Conversational
  • Relaxed Smooth
  • Eye contact Pleasant
  • Confident Proper speed
  • Facial expression Proper inflection
reasons format
Reasons Format

Opening Statement:

  • “Starting with the most complete in 1 and ending with the least feminine, lightest made in 4, I placed the class of yearling fillies 1-2-3-4.

Positive criticism of top place horse:

  • “Although the buckskin could be/have _____________, I nonetheless placed 1 over 2 in the top pair.
slide8
Top Pair:

- Miniature opening statement:

  • A general reason why 1 placed over 2. “Number 1 is not only higher quality but also nicer balanced ”. (Use only major criteria).

- Qualify your opening statement:

  • Use specific, comparative terminology (“-er” words) to substantiate higher quality then nicer balanced.

- Grant 2 over 1:

  • “I will admit that the two socked sorrel was higher volumed”.

- Criticism of 2:

  • A specific description (not comparative) of the individual “However as 2 is thick necked and short hipped I placed her second”.

- Transition into middle pair:

  • “Even so” or “Still yet” in my middle pair, I placed 2 over 3 as 2 …
slide9
Scoring Reasons
  • Scores range from 0-50.

Score Quality of Work Grade

45-50 Good to Excellent A

40-44 Above average to good B

35-39 Average C

30-34 Below average D

<30 Poor F

slide10

Name of Class

Good Qualities

Bad Qualities

1.

2.

3.

4.

slide11

Opening Statement = Name of class, placing, description of class

{Miniature opening statement}

3/2

2/3

Grant

  • Qualify opening statement
  • Comparable Advantages

2

Criticism

2/1

1/2

1

1/4

4/1

4

slide12

Yearling fillies, 3-2-1-4, highest quality, nicest balanced (3); least feminine, lightest made (4)

Quality & Balance

3/2

2/3

Straighter in toes from front Deeper hearted

  • Shorter backed, longer hipped
  • More proportional
  • Shorter head, cleaner neck

2

Short hipped, thick necked

2/1

1/2

1

1/4

4/1

4

conformation
CONFORMATION
  • The evaluation of a horse’s conformation is extremely important because form is related to function.
  • The criteria for evaluating conformation include:
      • Balance
      • Structure
      • Muscle
      • Quality
      • Breed and Sex Character
      • Travel
conformation1
Conformation
  • The relative weight placed on each category will partially depend on the magnitude of the differences between horses.
    • However, balance is considered the single most important selection criteria.
  • The ideal horse is one that best combines all of these qualities to the highest degree.
slide16

Figure 1

1) Balance

  • Balance is the relative proportion of body parts. A horse that is well balanced looks as though all the parts blend together correctly (Figure 1).
slide17
Proportionality (Figure 1)
  • A well balanced horse should divide equally into thirds:
    • The 1st third (line 1) is measured from the point of the shoulder to the heartgirth.
    • The 2nd third (line 2) from the withers to the flank.
    • The 3rd third (line 3) is from the flank to the point of the buttocks.
  • Furthermore, the length from the top of the withers to the sternum (line 6) should be approximately equal to the length from the sternum to the ground (line 7).
slide19
Angle of Shoulder and Hip (Figure 1)
  • A well balanced horse should have a long, sloping shoulder and hip which are relatively level.
    • The angle and length of shoulder is measured from the top of the withers to the point of the shoulder (Line 4).
    • The length and slope of hip is measured from the point of the hip to the point of the buttocks (Line 5).
  • If the imaginary vertical line coming straight down from the withers (Line 6) is well behind the horses front leg, then the horse probably has a good angle to the shoulder.
example of good balance1
Example of Good Balance

5

4

2

1

3

6

7

Yearling Filly

slide22
2) Structure

Front legs (Figures 2 & 3)

  • From the side, you should be able to draw a straight line from the top of the forearm through the knee and cannon and down to the ankle. The pastern should be relatively long and sloping.
  • From the front, you should be able to draw a straight line from the top of the forearm down through the knee and cannon bone and straight through the pastern and toe (Figure ???).
front leg conformation figure 2
Front-Leg Conformation (Figure 2)
  • Correct
  • Pastern too straight
  • Too much angle (coon-footed)

d. Behind at knee (calf-kneed)

e. Over at knee (buck-kneed)

f. Fine boned

front leg conformation figure 3
Front-Leg Conformation (Figure 3)
  • Correct
  • Toes-out (Splay-footed)
  • Toes-in (Pigeon-toed)
  • d. In at knees (Knock-kneed)
  • e. Base narrow
  • Bow-kneed
slide25
2) Structure

Hind legs (Figures 4 & 5)

  • From the side and rear, you should be able to draw a straight line from the point of the buttock down the back of the hock and cannon to the ground.
  • Correct structure of the pastern, cannon and toe is the same as that described for the front leg.
hind leg conformation figure 4
Hind-Leg Conformation (Figure 4)
  • Correct
  • Slightly in at hocks
  • In at hocks, out at toes (Cow-hocked)

d. Bow-legged, Pigeon-toed

e. Stands close (Base-narrow)

f. Stands wide (Base-wide)

hind leg conformation figure 5
Hind-Leg Conformation (Figure 5)
  • Correct
  • Correct
  • Too much angle (Sickle-hocked)

d. Too straight (Post-legged)

e. Stands under (Camped-under)

slide28
3) Muscle

Chest – The chest muscles or pectorals should be large and bulging. This muscle should carry well down the inside of the leg forming a definitive up-side-down “V” shape. The chest should be wide when measured from shoulder to shoulder.

Shoulder & Forearm – The shoulder muscle should be large and bulging. This muscle should be wide when measured horizontally from the point of the shoulder to the heartgirth. The forearm should have a large circumference and attach low towards the knee.

slide29
3) Muscle

Hip & Stifle – The hip should be long when measured from the point of the hip to the upper buttocks. The stifle should also be long when measured from the flank to the lower buttocks. From the rear, the stifle should be wider across the center than the width between the points of the hip.

Gaskin – The gaskin should be large, round and bulging with adequate length by tying in low near the front of the hock. This muscle should appear this way both inside and outside the leg.

example of heavy muscled
Example of Heavy Muscled

Shoulder, Forearm, Hip and Stifle

example of heavy muscled1
Example of Heavy Muscled

Chest (pectoral)

Stifle & Gaskin

slide32
4) Quality – Refers to the overall refinement of the head and neck.

Head – The head should be well chiseled with a triangular shape. The eyes should be set wide apart while appearing bold and bright. The head should be short and flat down the bridge of the nose with a small, refined muzzle and a round jaw.

Neck – The throatlatch should be clean and thin. The neck should be long and clean while tying in high at the shoulder.

slide34
5) Breed and Sex Character – Horses should exhibit the characteristics of their breed and the qualities of their sex.

Sex – Males, especially stallions, should exhibit masculinity by having larger heads and more bulging jaws than mares. Females should exhibit femininity by being more refined about the head and neck.

Breed – Horses should meet the standards set forth by their respective breed associations that separate the breed from others. Some directly relate to judging criteria while others refer to genetic differences in coat or skin color (e.g. Color Breed Associations).

slide35

Related to Structure

  • Straight Alignment:
    • Straight path
  • Toes-in: Wings out
  • Toes-out: Wings in
  • Base-narrow: Winds

6) Travel

slide38

1

2

3

4

slide39

1

2

3

4

aged geldings sample set
Aged Geldings –Sample Set

Initiating with a pair that were simply more complete, I placed this class of aged geldings 1-2-3-4.

I realize that 1 could be somewhat more refined in his head, still I preferred his size and muscle over the quality of 2 in my top pair.

The black was deeper hearted and wider through the floor of the chest, thus making him higher volumed. Furthermore, 1 was longer and more nearly level over his croup while having more length and depth of hip.

I will admit that 2 was more refined in his muzzle while being shorter down his face, however as the sorrel was somewhat steep crouped and short hipped, I left him second.

Still yet, it was 2’s obvious advantage in balance, muscle and quality that easily places him over 3 in the middle pair. Two was longer and more nearly level in his shoulder thus allowing for a shorter, stronger top in relation to a longer underline. Furthermore, the taller standing sorrel was more powerfully constructed, standing on more substance of muscle in his shoulder and forearm while being wider through the center of his stifle. Two also was more refined in his head and cleaner and higher tying in his neck.

Finding no appreciable grant for 3 over 2 and as the brown was coarse headed, light muscled and short statured I placed him third.

However, it was 3’s slight advantage in profile that situates him over 4 in the bottom pair. Three was longer, cleaner and higher tying in his neck, stronger behind his withers and more nearly level in his shoulder and top-line thus making him nicer profiling.

I do grant that 4 was deeper hearted and somewhat longer hipped, however I criticize the bay and leave him bottom as he was thick necked, straight shouldered and weak topped thus making him the lowest quality, poorest balanced horse in the class.

western pleasure
WESTERN PLEASURE

1) Attitude

  • Horses should be well broke and shown on a reasonably loose rein, but with light contact and control.
  • Horses should be willing and responsive, smooth in transitions and give the appearance of being comfortable in his performance and a pleasure to ride.
  • Horses should exhibit a pleasant attitude while appearing relaxed and consistent throughout the class.
slide42
2) Functional Correctness
    • Horses are required to perform the prescribed gaits and correct leads both directions of the arena .

Walk = 4-beat gait

Jog = 2-beat diagonal gait

Lope = 3-beat gait

Ex. Left Lead

  • Foot-fall pattern = Right hind, left hind & right front simultaneously, then left front.
slide43
3) Quality of Movement

Definition of Terms Used to Describe Movement

Square – Equal length of stride with diagonal pairs of legs.

Balanced – Ability of horse to keep itself properly positioned while in motion. Carrying an equal amount of weight on both front and rear.

Symmetric – Equal length of stride with lateral pairs of legs.

Cadenced – The distinct foot-fall patterns of the gaits. 4-beat walk, 2-beat jog and 3-beat lope.

slide44
Collected – Front end elevated while moving with drive and impulsion from the hindquarters. Hind legs should reach well under the horse while maintaining a distinctly cadenced gait.

Rhythm – Stride frequency or rate at which the horses moves it’s legs.

Lift – Period of suspension or elevated carriage.

Flow – Move smoothly or easily while being fluid.

Self-Carriage – A horse moving with a balanced, flowing motion of proper cadence with lift in his gaits while maintaining a level top-line.

slide45
3) Quality of Movement
  • Horses should move with drive and impulsion from the hindquarters allowing for a slow,distinct cadence that is collected and balanced.
  • Horses should have a free-flowing stride of reasonable length while maintaining forward momentum.
  • A balanced, flowing motion, a level topline and proper cadence and lift in its gaits makes it easy for the horse to maintain self-carriage.
slide46
3) Quality of Movement
  • Balance and flow cannot be achieved without forward motion and the proper cadence.
  • The balanced, flowing horse with a comfortable rhythm and good self-carriage should be rewarded for the degree of difficulty in its performance.
slide47
3) Quality of Movement
  • Balance and flow should always be rewarded over pace and positioning.
  • A slow horse on the rail does not get rewarded over a more balanced, flowing and comfortable horse that is off the rail.
slide48
3) Quality of Movement
  • The lack of forward motion affects the balance of a horse’s movement and interferes with his flow and cadence in his gaits.
  • When balance and flow are interfered with, the horse may: 1) start to bob his head, 2) hesitate in his motion, 3) turn sideways, 4) put his head too low on the forehand or 5) appear over bridled behind vertical.
slide50
4) Head & Neck Carriage
  • Horses should carry their head and neck in a relaxed, natural position while maintaining a steady top-line.
  • The poll should be level with or slightly above the level of the withers with the nose carried slightly in front of the vertical.

Level topline = Ear is level with the withers at the lowest point or eye is level with the withers at the highest point.

slide51
Lack of level topline
  • When the horse’s eye is consistently above its withers, its back becomes hollow and it loses its drive from behind.
  • When its ear is consistently below its withers, it becomes heavy on the forehand and has no lift or flow.
  • In both cases, the horse loses self-carriage.

5) Manners

  • Horses should have a bright expression with the ears alert.
slide52
Common Faults

Attitude

  • Requiring excessive and obvious cues and handling.
  • Resistance to the rider.
  • Excessive speed.

Functional Correctness

  • Breaking up or down in gait.
  • Out of lead front and/or rear.
    • Cross-firing = Wrong lead either front or rear.
    • Counter-canter = Wrong lead both front and rear.
slide53
Movement
  • Uncollected
  • Lacking drive from hindquarter
  • Heavy fronted, Heavy on the forehand
  • Elevated in knees
  • Quick strided or cadenced
  • 4-beat jog and lope
  • Asymmetric – Unequal stride length
  • Short/choppy strided
  • Lacks flow, rhythm and/or balance
  • Lacks forward motion
slide54
Frame
  • Poll carried too low/high.
  • Nosing out extremely.
  • Carrying head behind vertical.
  • Unsteady top-line from withers to poll.
  • Looking from side to side.

Manners

  • Pinning ears.
  • Mouthing bit.
  • Wringing tail.
hunter under saddle
HUNTER UNDER SADDLE

1) Attitude

  • Horses should be well mannered and respond willingly to the rider with light leg and hand contact.
  • Horses should be shown on light contact (in hand).
  • Horses should exhibit a pleasant attitude while appearing relaxed and consistent throughout the class.
slide56
2) Functional Correctness
    • Horses are required to perform the prescribed gaits and correct leads both directions of the arena .

Walk = 4-beat gait

Trot = 2-beat diagonal gait

Canter = 3-beat gait

Ex. Left Lead

  • Foot-fall pattern = Right hind, left hind & right front simultaneously, then left front.
slide57
3) Quality of Movement

Suitability – Long, low, ground covering strides.

Square – Equal length of stride with diagonal pairs of legs.

Balanced – Carrying an equal amount of weight on both front and rear.

Symmetric – Equal length of stride with lateral pairs of legs.

Cadenced – The distinct foot-fall patterns of the gaits. 4-beat walk, 2-beat trot and 3-beat canter.

slide58
Collected – Front end elevated while moving with drive and impulsion from the hindquarters. Hind legs should reach well under the horse while maintaining a distinctly cadenced gait.

Rhythm – Stride frequency or rate at which the horses moves it’s legs.

Lift – Period of suspension or elevated carriage.

Self-Carriage – A horse moving with a balanced, flowing motion of proper cadence with lift in his gaits while maintaining a level top-line.

slide59
3) Quality of Movement
  • Hunters Under Saddle should be suitable to purpose.
  • Horses should move with long, low strides reaching forward with ease and smoothness.
  • Horses should be able to lengthen stride and cover ground with relaxed, free flowing movement.
slide60
4) Head & Neck Carriage
  • The poll should be level with or slightly above the level of the withers.
  • The head should be carried slightly in front of, or on, the vertical.

5) Manners

  • Horses should have a bright expression with the ears alert.
slide61
Common Faults

Attitude

  • Requiring excessive and obvious cues and handling.
  • Resistance to the rider.
  • Excessive speed.

Functional Correctness

  • Breaking up or down in gait.
  • Out of lead front and/or rear.
    • Cross-firing = Wrong lead either front or rear.
    • Counter-canter = Wrong lead both front and rear.
slide62
Movement
  • Uncollected
  • Lacking drive from hindquarter
  • Heavy fronted, Heavy on the forehand
  • Elevated in knees
  • Quick strided or cadenced
  • 4-beat trot and canter
  • Asymmetric – Unequal stride length
  • Short/choppy strided
  • Lacks flow, rhythm and/or balance
  • Lacks forward motion
slide63
Frame
  • Poll carried too low/high.
  • Nosing out extremely.
  • Carrying head behind vertical.
  • Unsteady top-line from withers to poll.
  • Looking from side to side.

Manners

  • Pinning ears.
  • Mouthing bit.
  • Wringing tail.
reining
REINING

To rein a horse is not only to guide him, but also to control his every movement.

The best reined horse should be willingly guided or controlled with little or no apparent resistance and dictated to completely. Any movement on his own must be considered a lack of control.

All deviations from the exact written pattern must be considered a lack of or temporary loss of control and therefore faulted according to severity.

Credit should be given for smoothness, finesse, attitude, quickness and authority of performing various maneuvers, while using controlled speed which raises the degree of difficulty.

scoring system for reining
Scoring System for Reining

Maneuver Scores

+1.5 Excellent (WOW!)

+1 Very Good (Correct, High Degree of Difficulty)

+1/2 Good (Correct, Some Degree of Difficulty)

0 Average (Correct, No Degree of Difficulty)

-1/2 Poor (Incorrect, Some Resistance)

-1 Very Poor (Incorrect, Excessive Resistance)

-1.5 Extremely Poor (Oh no!)

*Degree of difficulty means adding speed without loss of

correctness.

*Scores for the maneuvers must be decided on one maneuver at a time, and include the entire maneuver.

scoring system for reining1
Scoring System for Reining
  • Maneuvers are scored immediately after they are completed (-1 1/2 to +1 1/2).
  • Penalties are assigned immediately after the maneuver is

completed.

  • Final score will be from 0-Infinity with 70 denoting an average performance.
    • 70 + (maneuver score total - penalties)
slide67

3

0

Reining Score Card

Penalty Score

SL

CR

SR

F8

RRB

LRB

S&B

CL

Penalty Score

frequently seen penalties in reining
Frequently Seen Penalties in Reining

1/2 point penalties

  • Delayed lead change by one stride.
  • Starting the circles at a jog or exiting a rollback at

a jog for up to 2 strides.

  • Over-spinning or under-spinning up to 1/8 of a turn.
  • Failure to remain a minimum of 20 feet from wall or

fence when approaching a stop or rollback.

slide69
1 point penalties
  • Each time a horse is out of lead.
  • The penalty for being out of lead is accumulative, add a 1 point penalty for each 1/4 of the circumference of a circle or any part thereof that a horse is out of lead.
  • Over or under-spinning between 1/8 to 1/4 of a turn.
  • For patterns requiring a run-around, failure to be on correct lead when rounding the end of the arena for ½ the

turn or less.

slide70
2 point penalties
  • Break of gait.
  • Freeze up in spins or rollbacks.
  • Initiate slide tracks in front of or on the marker.
  • Jogging more than 2 strides, but less than 1/2 the circle

or length of arena.

  • In patterns with a run-around, failure to be on correct lead when rounding the end of the arena for more than ½ the turn.
  • On walk-in patterns, failure to stop or walk before

executing a canter departure.

  • On run-in patterns, failure to be in a canter prior to the first marker.
slide71
5 point penalties
  • Blatant disobedience including kicking, biting, bucking and rearing.
  • Spurring in front of the cinch.
  • Touching horse or saddle with free hand.
slide72
0 score
  • Failure to complete pattern as written.
  • Adding maneuvers, such as backing more than two strides (four steps) or turning more than 90 degrees.
  • Refusal of commands where pattern is delayed.
  • Jogging more than 1/2 circle or 1/2 length of arena.
  • Over-spinning more than a 1/4 of a turn.
  • Fall of horse or rider.
maneuvers to be scored in reining
Maneuvers to be Scored in Reining

Stops

  • Horses should run hard into stops without anticipation and stop hard.
  • Horses should stop with their hocks deep in the ground while sliding long and straight.

Rollbacks

  • Horses should roll back quick and prompt out of the stops.
  • Horses should roll back over their tracks and promptly pick up the lope.
maneuvers to be scored in reining1
Maneuvers to be Scored in Reining

Spins

  • Horses should keep a stationary pivot foot while spinning quickly and low to the ground.
  • Their front feet should cross over while keeping their nose to the inside of the spin.
  • They should stop the spin promptly where specified.
maneuvers to be scored in reining2
Maneuvers to be Scored in Reining

Circles

  • Horses should perform the correct size of circles at the designated speed.
  • Horses should keep their nose to the inside of the circle with their body arched around the circle.
  • Circles should be round and proportional.
  • Horses should demonstrate adequate size and speed variation between circles.
  • Flying lead changes should be performed smoothly and promptly.
western riding
WESTERN RIDING
  • Western Riding is an event where the horse is judged on quality of gaits, lead changes at the lope, response to the rider, manners, and disposition. The horse should perform with reasonable speed, and be sensible, well-mannered, free and easy moving.
slide78

Scoring System for Western Riding

  • Final Score
  • 0 – Infinity with 70 denoting average performance.
    • 70 + (maneuver score total - penalties)
  • Maneuver Scores
  • +1.5 Excellent (WOW!)
  • +1 Very Good (Correct, Excellent mover)
  • +1/2 Good (Correct, Good mover)
  • 0 Average (Correct, Average mover)
  • -1/2 Poor (Incorrect, Poor mover)
  • -1 Very Poor (Incorrect, Very poor mover)
  • -1.5 Extremely Poor (Oh no!)
give credit for
Give Credit For
  • Smoothness and even cadence of gaits (starting and finishing the pattern with the same cadence or speed).
  • Horse’s ability to change leads precisely, easily, and simultaneously both hind and front at the center-point between the markers.
  • Relaxed head carriage while showing response to the rider’s hands, with moderate flexion at the poll.
  • Crossing the log at both the jog and lope without breaking gait or significantly changing stride.
frequently seen penalties in western riding
Frequently Seen Penalties in Western Riding

1/2 point penalties

  • Hind legs skipping or coming together during lead change (skip change).
  • Tick or light touch of log.
  • Non-simultaneous lead change (front-hind or hind-front).
slide81
1 point penalties
  • Hitting or rolling the log.
  • Splitting the log (log between the two front or two hind feet) at the lope.
  • Out of the lead for more than one stride either side of center.
  • Break of gait at the walk or jog up to two strides.
slide82
3 point penalties
  • Break of gait at the lope or Simple change of leads.
  • Not performing the specific gait or stopping within 10 feet of the designated area.
  • Additional lead changes anywhere in pattern (except when correcting an extra change or incorrect lead).
  • Out of lead at or before the marker prior to the designated change area or out of lead at or after the marker after the designated change.
  • In patterns 1 and 3, failure to start the lope within 30 feet after crossing the log.
  • Break of gait at walk or jog for more strides.
slide83
5 point penalties
  • Blatant disobedience including kicking out, biting and bucking.
  • Out of lead beyond the next designated change area (failure to change, including cross-cantering, at two consecutive change areas result in 10 penalty points).
slide84
0 - Score
  • Failure to complete pattern as written.
  • Lack of four flying lead changes.
  • Knocking over markers.
  • Completely missing the log.
  • Major refusal - stop and back more than 2 strides or 4 steps with front legs.
  • Major disobedience - rearing, schooling.
  • Failure to start lope prior to end cone in pattern #1.
slide85

3 point penalty

5 point penalty

Lead Penalties – Line Side

1 point penalty

No penalty

Lead Change

Lead Change

3 point penalty

1 point penalty

slide86

3 point penalty

3 point penalty

5 point penalty

Lead Penalties - Crossing

1 point penalty

No penalty

Lead

Change

1 point penalty

Lead Change

trail
TRAIL

Judging Criteria

  • Performance over obstacles.
    • Manners
    • Response to rider
    • Quality of Movement
  • Credit for negotiating obstacles:
    • Correctness
    • Some degree of speed
      • Degree of Difficulty (DOD)
    • Style
slide88

Scoring System for Trail

  • Final Score
  • 0 – Infinity with 70 denoting average performance.
    • 70 + (maneuver score total - penalties)

Obstacle Scores

+1.5 Excellent (WOW!)

+1 Very Good (Correct, High DOD)

+1/2 Good (Correct, Some DOD)

0 Average (Correct, no DOD)

-1/2 Poor (Incorrect)

-1 Very Poor (Incorrect)

-1.5 Extremely Poor (Oh no!)

slide89
Mandatory obstacles:
    • Gate
    • Ride over at least four logs or poles
    • Backing obstacle
  • Optional Obstacles:
    • Serpentine obstacles at walk or jog
    • Ride over wooden bridge
    • Side-pass
    • Turn in a box
slide90
Frequently Seen Penalties in Trail

½ point

  • Each tick of log, pole, cone or obstacle.

1 point

  • Hitting or stepping on log, pole, cone or obstacle.
  • Break of gait at walk or jog for two strides or less.
  • Both front or hind feet in a single stride slot.
  • Skipping over required space.
  • Split pole in lope over.
slide91
3 point
  • Break of gait at walk or jog for more than 2 strides.
  • Out of lead or break of gait at lope.
  • Knocking down elevated pole, cone, barrel or severely disturbing an obstacle.

3 to 5 point (depending on severity)

  • Stepping outside the confines of; falling or jumping off or out of an obstacle (back thru, bridge, side pass, box, water box).
slide92
5 point
  • Dropping objects to be carried.
  • First refusal, balk, or attempt to evade an obstacle by shying or backing more than 2 strides.
  • Letting go of gate or dropping rope gate.

5 point(Plus entry cannot place over another entry that

completes the course correctly).

  • Blatant disobedience (kicking, bucking, rearing, striking).
  • Failure to ever demonstrate correct lead or gait.
  • Failure to complete obstacle.
  • Second refusal, balk, or attempt to evade an obstacle by shying or backing more than 2 strides.
slide93
0 - Score
  • Performing the obstacles other than in specified order.
  • No attempt to perform an obstacle.
  • Failure to enter, exit or work obstacle from correct side or direction.
  • Failure to take correct line within or between obstacles.
  • Failure to work an obstacle other than how it’s described by the course.
  • Riding outside the designated boundary marker of the course.
  • Third refusal.
hunter hack
HUNTER HACK

Class Requirements

  • Horses are required to jump two fences followed by flat work.
    • Flat work will be judged exactly as hunter under saddle.
    • The fence work will account for a minimum of 70% of the total score while the flat work will constitute a maximum of 30%.
hunter hack1
HUNTER HACK

Judging Criteria

  • Performance over jumps.
    • Manners.
    • Way of going (Quality of movement).
    • Style of jumping.
  • Credit for negotiating jumps:
    • Maintaining even hunting pace.
    • Free-flowing stride (Suitability).
    • Correct jumping style.
      • Forearms parallel, lower legs tucked, neck and back rounded (Scope).
    • Meets fences squarely.
    • Jumping at center of fence.
slide96

Scoring System for Hunter Hack

  • Final Score
  • 0 – 100 with 70’s denoting average performance.

Scores

90-100 Excellent performer, excellent mover

80-89 Good performer, Good mover

70-79 Average performer, average mover

60-69 Poor mover, minor mistakes

50-59 One major fault (hind knockdown, refusal,

trot, out of lead, or drops a leg)

30-49 Two or more major faults (front knockdowns

an refusals, dangerous jumping manner)

10-29 Avoids elimination but the most unsafe jumper

slide97

Major Faults

  • Refusal
    • Horse stops in front of jump.
  • Bolting
    • Loss of control.
  • Running Out
    • Evades or passes the jump.
  • Knockdown
    • Lowering any part of the obstacle which established the height (rails or elements).
slide98

Other Faults

  • Cutting Down
    • Horse drops its front legs after clearing fence.
      • Often occurs when horse leaves the ground too far from the jump.
  • Propping
    • Horse pushes away or sets back from fence at the point of take-off.
      • Often occurs when horse approaches obstacle too fast.
  • Chipping-In
    • Extreme form of propping.
      • Often occurs when horses arrives at the jump out of stride and adds a short stride while often coming off one hind leg.
slide99

Other Faults

  • Drifting
    • Horse does not approach fence in a straight line.
  • Twisting
    • Horses that lack scope (jumping ability) may shift their front end or hindquarters to the side to clear the jump.
  • Loose Form
    • When a horse does not fold its lower legs tightly and the forearms appear uneven.
slide100

Elimination

  • Third cumulative disobedience.
    • Refusal, stop, run out, or extra circle.
  • Bolting from arena.
  • Off Course.
calf roping
Calf Roping

Class Requirements

  • Horses will be judged on manners behind the barrier, scoring, speed to calf, rating calf, stopping working the rope and its manners while the roper is returning to the horse after the tie is made.
    • The roper may throw two loops and must be done within so within a one minute time limit from the time the calf leaves the chute.
    • Any catch that holds is legal, but the rope must remain on the calf until tie is made and the roper has mounted horse.
scoring the calf roping run
Scoring the Calf Roping Run

1) The Box and Barrier

  • Horses that enter the box quietly, turning either direction, and stand flat-footed, alert and in control until cued by the rider to go should receive credit.
    • Horses should not be squatting or leaning against the back or sides of the box.
    • The horse should leave the box on the rider’s command without breaking the barrier.
slide103
2) Running and Rating
  • Horses should break smoothly and evenly from the box and run to a point directly behind the calf.
    • A horse that runs to the correct position, hangs there until the roper throws and then prepares to stop should receive credit.
    • A horse that is running and rating properly and continues to trail a calf that goes to the right should receive extra credit.
slide104
3) The Stop
  • Stopping is one of the most important parts of the run and a horse cannot stop too hard.
    • The ideal stop would jerk the calf down hard enough so that the roper can reach the animal a it regains its feet and before it can run around on the end of the rope.
    • A horse that stops on his rear end while staying straight and then immediately starts to get back should receive credit.
slide105
4) Working the Rope
  • After stopping, the horse should begin backing and continue to back in a straight line to bring the calf to the roper as quickly as possible.
    • After the roper has thrown the calf, the horse should stop backing and not drag the calf while the roper is completing the tie.
    • The horse should look straight down the rope at the calf, keeping the rope tight and stand quietly while the roper remounts.
slide106

Scoring System for Calf Roping

  • Final Score
  • 0 – Infinity with 70 denoting average performance.
    • 70 + (maneuver score total - penalties)
  • Scores
  • When a horse performs in an exceptional manner, it should be award points, just as it should have them taken away when it commits errors in the run.
suggested guidelines for scoring calf roping
Suggested Guidelines for Scoring Calf Roping

Box & Barrier

Credit = 1-2 points.

Penalties:

1-2 points

  • Reluctance to enter the box and turn around readily.
  • Nervousness.
  • Turns head severely.
  • Squats in the corner.

2-5 points (depending on severity)

  • Refusing to enter box.
  • Rearing up in the box.
  • Freezing in the box (refusing to move).
  • Broken barrier.
slide108
Running and Rating

Credit = 1-3 points.

Penalties:

1-2 points

  • Trouble maintaining position.

2-5 points (depending on severity)

  • Setting up or scotching.

3-5 points (depending on severity)

  • Running into calf.
slide109
The Stop

Credit = 1-3 points.

Penalties:

1-3 points (depending on severity)

  • Using reins to stop horse.
  • Stopping crooked (quartering).

3 points

  • Begins stop on front end.
  • Rearing up in stop.
  • Ducking off badly.
slide110
Working the Rope

Credit = 1-3 points.

Penalties:

1 point

  • Looking off.

1-3 points (depending on severity)

  • Failure to continue backing while calf is thrown.
  • Slack in rope.
  • Dragging calf excessively while tying or remounting.

3 points

  • Rubbing the rope.

5 points

  • Running rope down opposite side of horse’s neck.
slide111
Disqualification
  • Failure of the rope to remain on the calf until tie is completed and roper has mounted horse.
  • Failure of roper to re-throw calf if calf is not standing when roper reaches calf.
  • Failure of the calf to stay tied until roper has remounted and ridden forward to loosen the rope.
dally team roping heading
Dally Team Roping - Heading

Class Requirements

  • The roper shall leave the head box (left side of steer), rope the steer around the head and turn it to the left after which the heeler shall rope one or both hind legs.
    • The run is completed when the heeler has roped the heels and dallied and the header wheels around and faces the heeler.
    • Two loops are allowed both the header and heeler, but there is a one minute time limit.
scoring the team roping run
Scoring the Team Roping Run

1) The Box and Barrier

  • Horses that enter the box quietly, turning either direction, and stand flat-footed, alert and in control until cued by the rider to go should receive credit.
    • Horses should not be squatting or leaning against the back or sides of the box.
    • The horse should leave the box on the rider’s command without breaking the barrier.
slide114
2) Running and Rating
  • Horses should run hard to the steer’s left hip staying flat and smooth and not be climbing.
    • The horse should rate here as long as necessary without ducking off.
    • A horse that runs to the correct position, hangs there until the roper throws and then prepares to set the steer should receive credit.
slide115
3) Setting and Handling
  • After the roper has roped the steer, taken his dally and picked up on his horse:
    • The heading horse should drop his hind end slightly in the ground, slowing the steer and turning his head to the left (the set).
    • The horse should quarter, or pivot on his left hind leg, come up out of the set and lead the steer off to the left.
slide116
3) Setting and Handling
  • The heading horse should have control of the steer out of the set and should lead the steer off at a speed that allows the heeler to get a good, quick controlled throw at the heels.
  • The heading horse should be smooth and flat while leading the steer in a straight line toward the left fence of the arena.
  • The heading horse should pull the steer with his body without moving sideways with the weight of the steer on his shoulders.
slide117
4) Facing
  • The final part of the heading horse’s run is the face, when the header wheels around and faces the heeler. The header should face his horse when the heeler has roped the heels and dallied.
    • The heading horse should come around flat, without rearing, and then stay back on the rope.
    • When the face is completed, the heading horse should be looking straight down the rope, with both the header’s and heeler’s ropes tight.
slide118
4) Facing
  • It is preferred and considered more correct for a horse to face by pivoting on his rear end.
  • A horse that makes a quick, smooth flat face while keeping the rope tight should receive credit.
slide119

Scoring System for Team Roping

  • Final Score
  • 0 – Infinity with 70 denoting average performance.
    • 70 + (maneuver score total - penalties)
  • Scores
  • When a horse performs in an exceptional manner, it should be award points, just as it should have them taken away when it commits errors in the run.
suggested guidelines for scoring heading
Suggested Guidelines for Scoring Heading

Box & Barrier

Credit = 1-2 points.

Penalties:

1-2 points

  • Reluctance to enter the box and turn around readily.
  • Nervousness.
  • Turns head severely.
  • Squats in the corner.

2-5 points (depending on severity)

  • Refusing to enter box.
  • Rearing up in the box.
  • Freezing in the box (refusing to move).
  • Broken barrier.
slide121
Running and Rating

Credit = 1-3 points.

Penalties:

2 points

  • Trouble maintaining position.
  • Getting outrun.

3-5 points (depending on severity)

  • Ducking off.
slide122
Setting and Handling

Credit = 1-3 points.

Penalties:

1-2 points

  • Significantly changing speed while dragging.
  • Lunging while dragging the steer.
  • Horse moving sideways while dragging.
  • Pulling steer with the shoulder.
  • Horse sets the steer on his front end.

2-3 points

  • Severe quartering at the beginning of the set.

3-5 points (depending on severity)

  • Dropping shoulder and ducking off.

8 points

  • Refusing to pull the steer.
slide123
Facing

Credit = 1-2 points.

Penalties:

1-2 points

  • Not getting around straight.
  • Rearing while facing.
  • Resistance to the rider.