district strategies that improve teaching learning n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
DISTRICT STRATEGIES THAT ImprovE TEACHING/LEARNING PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
DISTRICT STRATEGIES THAT ImprovE TEACHING/LEARNING

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 35

DISTRICT STRATEGIES THAT ImprovE TEACHING/LEARNING - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 154 Views
  • Uploaded on

DISTRICT STRATEGIES THAT ImprovE TEACHING/LEARNING. MICHAEL DiPAOLA, EdD DLST PROJECT February 13, 2012. SCHOOL/DISTRICT STRATEGIES SCHOOL/DISTRICT STRATEGIES THAT IMPROVE LEARNING. HOW MANY OF THESE STRATEGIES FOCUS ON ANALYZING ACHIEVEMENT DATA?.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

DISTRICT STRATEGIES THAT ImprovE TEACHING/LEARNING


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. DISTRICT STRATEGIES THAT ImprovE TEACHING/LEARNING MICHAEL DiPAOLA, EdD DLST PROJECT February 13, 2012

    2. SCHOOL/DISTRICT STRATEGIES SCHOOL/DISTRICT STRATEGIES THAT IMPROVE LEARNING

    3. HOW MANY OF THESE STRATEGIES FOCUS ON ANALYZING ACHIEVEMENT DATA? HOW MANY STRATEGIES FOCUS ON IMPROVING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF INSTRUCTION? WHAT ASSUMPTIONS DO WE MAKE?

    4. The Power of Formative Feedback

    5. TEACHER FEEDBACK (FRAYER MODEL) TEACHER FEEDBACK

    6. DO YOU assume classroom teachers are receiving formative feedback on their teaching to help improve instruction? What Evidence Supports That Assumption?

    7. Data • What data are provided to teachers about their actual teaching performance? • How are the data collected? • Do they know what to do with the data? • How are they helpful?

    8. GOALS of Supervision • “…to work cooperatively with teachers to improve instruction.” • “…to engage with teachers in the study of the processes of teaching and learning.” • to create “…a nonthreatening atmosphere, by working in a collegial manner, and by creating in teachers a sense of inquiry and experimentation.” • To help teachers learn to become more effective at helping students learn. • Permanently change teaching behaviors to reflect high-yield instructional pedagogy

    9. SUPERVISION (FRAYER MODEL) SUPERVISION

    10. BARRIERS TO EFFECTIVE SUPERVISION • Some administrators are too authoritarian and insecure - they don’t have the disposition to provide formative feedback • Lack of distinction between supervision and evaluation • The climate of the school • Lack of collegiality

    11. Why Supervision & Evaluation Are NOT EffectiveMarshall (2008) • High-stakes evaluation tends to shut down adult learning • Evaluation instruments get in the way • Observations fail to provide specific feedback data • Principals are too busy to complete the tasks well • Evaluation almost never focuses on learning

    12. COLLECTING DATA SO TEACHERS CAN ANALYZE IT TO REFLECT *New Teacher Center at the University of California, Santa Cruz

    13. “learning in the setting where you work… is the learning with the greatest payoff because it is more specific and because it is social” Fullan (2001)

    14. Instructional Leadership

    15. Collegial Supervision:A Formative Process • Principals and Supervisors share leadership with Teachers and engage in coaching, reflection, joint investigation, study teams, and problem solving. • The process should be peer driven and data focused.

    16. CREATING A CONTEXT for Collegial Supervision non-threatening atmosphere in which • classroom data, not judgments, are used to determine problems • professionals can be open and authentic with each other • the principal and teachers work together to enhance the teaching- learning process

    17. GoalS of Collegial Supervision • Effectiveness (improvement of instruction) is defined as the degree to which expected performance is congruent with actual performance at the student and teacher levels. • Teacher learning that results in student learning

    18. Problem Identification • Teaching is “a system of intentional actions aimed at inducing the learning of skills, knowledge, and values.” • Identify area or areas where there is a significant discrepancy between the actual teaching and desired teaching

    19. View the video clip – • what lesson does it teach us about the value of classroom observation?

    20. Instructional Strategies that Effective Teachers Consistently Implement Questioning Skills & Techniques Significant relationship between student achievement and the effective use of questioning at different cognitive levels (Brophy & Good, 1986; Cawelti, 1999; Hattie, 2009; Tobin, 1980).

    21. Cognitive Levels of Questioning • Remembering • Understanding • Applying • Analyzing • Evaluating • Creating

    22. Instructional Strategies that Effective Teachers Consistently Implement Effective Use of Instructional Time Significant relationship between time spent on content and student achievement (Anderman & Midgley, 1998; Berliner, 1988; Hattie, 2009; Lumsden, 1994; Marzano, 2000).

    23. STUDENT ENGAGEMENT a psychological process; specifically, the attention, interest, investment, and effort students expend in the work of learning (Marks, 2000)

    24. STUDENT ENGAGEMENTStudents Demonstrate Engagement in Many Ways For example through behaviors that observers described as: • showing effort • concentration • attention to task • asking questions • contributing in interactions (Birch & Ladd, 1997; Finn & Voelkl 1993).

    25. Instructional Strategies that Effective Teachers Consistently Implement Teacher/Student Interactions Teacher verbal activities that keep the learning activity directed, focused, and organized. Student verbal activities that indicate engagement

    26. Examples of Teacher/Student Interactions • Providing Information • Questioning/Probing • Releasing Control • Answering • Clarifying • Praising/Scolding • Giving Directions • Redirecting Skills & Techniques

    27. HOW CAN DATA COLLECTION DEVICES BE USED in your division TO HELP TEACHERS REFLECT ON THEIR TEACHING AND MAKE POSITIVE CHANGES TO HELP STUDENTS LEARN?

    28. LINKS TO MODEL PRE AND POST CONFERENCES http://henricostaffdev.org/post_ob_conference/category/sample-conferences/planning-conference-1/http://henricostaffdev.org/post_ob_conference/

    29. INTERESDTED INUSING DATA COLLECTION FORMS ON A TABLET OF LAPTOP? CONTACT: John Caggiano ‎[caggianojohn1@gmail.com]‎