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The Northeast Indians Daily Life in the 1500’s

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  1. The Northeast IndiansDaily Life in the 1500’s Kristy Rodgers EDU 509 Prof. Sheehan December 2006

  2. The Northeast • Stretches from Maine to North Carolina • Bordered by Mississippi River on west • Bordered by Atlantic Ocean on east

  3. The Woodlands • Land: • Mountains, lakes, forests • Provided materials for homes, tools, & clothing • Plant life • Allowed for hunting & fishing • Climate: • Varies according to location • Extreme North: harsh winters & mild summers • Southern part: mild winters & humid summers

  4. Longhouse – large house made from trees and bark Lived in all year long Held large, extended families Wigwam – round house covered with tree bark Smaller, fit single family When tribes moved, they rolled up bark covers Shelter

  5. Food • Men hunted ducks and turkeys • Men fished for salmon & other fish • Women gathered food from land • Berries, honey, nuts, wild rice • Crops: • “3 sisters” = Corn, beans & squash • Sunflowers, pumpkins, gourds

  6. First crop planted • Most important crop • Eaten at every meal • Ground into cornmeal for baking bread • Preserved for winter months

  7. Clothing • Made from animal skins • Rabbits, deer, bears • Breechcloths – short, skirt-like garment tied around waist with open slits on sides • Shirts, leggings, dresses, warm fur robes • Moccasins – made of animal skins • Sometimes with fancy beadwork

  8. Trading & Economy • Tribes traded furs, tools, shells, and corn • Wampum • Used to record important events • Traded as a kind of currency • Show title or authority (Chief) • Handcrafted - made of beads • Highly valued for gift giving

  9. Attend school Socialize with other children Learn from parents Boys go hunting and fishing with their fathers Girls practiced childcare with cornhusk dolls Sports/Games – nature provided materials Lacrosse – sport played by boys/adult men Stickball – used wooden stick Snow snake – winter sport Children

  10. Traditions • Celebrated seasons with games, songs, and dances • Green Corn Ceremony – late summer • When first ears of corn were ready to harvest • Celebrated for 4 days • Feather Dance • Men wore feathers and thanked earth for crops • Women made special foods • Succotash – a favorite, made of corn and beans

  11. Passing On Tradition • History and beliefs were passed by telling stories • long winter nights – sat by fire • elders told stories

  12. League of Nations • 5 Iroquois nations joined to form League of Nations (late 1400’s) • Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, and Seneca… later Tuscarora joined (1722) • Made decisions about trade and land rights • Made agreements with tribes • Discussed war decisions • League of Nations – kept peace • Each tribe had spokesman • Needed to reach agreement

  13. References • King, C. (2004). Native Americans in Sports. Sharpe Reference V.2. • Shenandoah-Tekalihwa, J., Kahionhes-Fadden, J., & George-Kanentiio, D. (1997). Skywoman: Legends of the Iroquois. Clear Light Books. • (2003). http://www.nativeamericans.com/Iroquois.htm Retrieved on October 23, 2006 from Native Americans: Iroquois Culture

  14. The End