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Transport of Radioactive Material PowerPoint Presentation
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Transport of Radioactive Material

Transport of Radioactive Material

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Transport of Radioactive Material

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    1. Transport of Radioactive Material

    2. Objectives By the end of this module, the student will be able to: State the distinction between the two forms of radioactive material. Rank the different regulatory quantities of radioactive material. State the different radioactive material package types. Recognize radioactive material placards, markings, and labels.

    3. Objectives List the types of radioactive materials shipments which require placarding. Briefly explain what is meant by transport index, and exclusive use. Determine the type of label required for given package dose rates. Find relevant useful emergency response information from placards, labels, and shipping papers. State the maximum dose rates to be found at the following locations; in the cab, on the outside of a package, on the outside of a vehicle. RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS The Department of Transportation defines radioactive materials as materials with a specific activity greater than 0.002 Ci/g (74 Bq/g) as radioactive, hazardous material. For purposes of transportation radioactive materials having a specific activity not exceeding 0.002 Ci/g (74 Bq/g) are not subject to regulations in transportation. This is, however, a "de minimis" level which applies only to transportation. For purposes of licensing during use and possession, such materials may still be subject to regulation by the NRC. As stated above, any radioactive material with a specific activity greater than 0.002 Ci/g (74 Bq/g) is considered a hazardous material and is subject to DOT rules. Once identified as radioactive, its description and shipping name need to be identified to properly label the package for shipping. RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION DEFINITIONS As previously discussed, the Department of Transportation defines radioactive material as material having a specific activity greater than 0.002 Ci/g (74 Bq/g). Transportation of radioactive materials is regulated jointly on a federal level by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation. Hazardous Materials Regulations as they apply to radioactive materials are described in 49 CFR 173 Subpart I. The following are some commonly encountered terms and definitions. A1 Based on external radiation hazards, the maximum activity of special form material permitted in a Type A package, such that its escape from the packaging would cause only a direct radiation hazard. A2 Based on radiotoxicity, the maximum activity of normal form radioactive material (other than special form or low specific activity radioactive material) permitted in a Type A package, such that its escape from the packaging would present both a radiation and a contamination hazard.RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS The Department of Transportation defines radioactive materials as materials with a specific activity greater than 0.002 Ci/g (74 Bq/g) as radioactive, hazardous material. For purposes of transportation radioactive materials having a specific activity not exceeding 0.002 Ci/g (74 Bq/g) are not subject to regulations in transportation. This is, however, a "de minimis" level which applies only to transportation. For purposes of licensing during use and possession, such materials may still be subject to regulation by the NRC. As stated above, any radioactive material with a specific activity greater than 0.002 Ci/g (74 Bq/g) is considered a hazardous material and is subject to DOT rules. Once identified as radioactive, its description and shipping name need to be identified to properly label the package for shipping. RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION DEFINITIONS As previously discussed, the Department of Transportation defines radioactive material as material having a specific activity greater than 0.002 Ci/g (74 Bq/g). Transportation of radioactive materials is regulated jointly on a federal level by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation. Hazardous Materials Regulations as they apply to radioactive materials are described in 49 CFR 173 Subpart I. The following are some commonly encountered terms and definitions. A1 Based on external radiation hazards, the maximum activity of special form material permitted in a Type A package, such that its escape from the packaging would cause only a direct radiation hazard. A2 Based on radiotoxicity, the maximum activity of normal form radioactive material (other than special form or low specific activity radioactive material) permitted in a Type A package, such that its escape from the packaging would present both a radiation and a contamination hazard.

    4. Philosophy Safety is based on the package. The package integrity depends on the hazard Level.

    5. Form

    6. Form A1 = Maximum special form quantity allowed in a Type A package. A2 = Maximum normal form quantity allowed in a Type A package. Fractions and multiples also used for other criteria.

    8. Type A Package

    9. Typical Type A Packages

    10. Typical Type A Packages

    11. Type A Package Tests

    12. Type A Package Tests

    13. Type A Package

    14. Type B Package Tests http://www.sandia.gov/tp/SAFE_RAM/TESTING.HTMhttp://www.sandia.gov/tp/SAFE_RAM/TESTING.HTM

    15. Type B Package Tests

    16. Type B Package

    17. Type B Packages

    18. Type B Packages

    19. Limited Quantities Exempt from certain packaging and labeling requirements Typically one-thousandth of the A1 or A2 value.

    20. Low Specific Activity Low concentration of activity per mass. Exempt from certain packaging and labeling requirements.

    21. Low Specific Activity Container

    22. Highway Route Controlled Quantity Very large quantities. 30,000 Ci or 3,000 times the A1 or A2 value.

    23. Highway Route Controlled Quantity Route Plan Origin and destination Route stops Departure and arrival times Emergency phone number Driver Certification Name and license number Date of written training Name and address of instructor Driver trained in hazards of HRCQ

    24. Fissile Radioactive Material

    25. Fissile Radioactive Material

    26. Fissile Radioactive Material

    27. Exclusive Use Single consignor All loading and unloading under direction of consignor/consignee

    28. Fissile Material Capable of undergoing nuclear fission Examples 235U 233U 238Pu 239Pu 241Pu

    29. Transport Index A unit-less number used to control groups of packages Radiation level in mrem/hr at 1 meter Maximum of 10 Sum of TI maximum of 50

    30. Requirements for Package Labels

    31. Radioactive Labels

    32. Placarding Not required for all radioactive material shipments Eg. Limited Quantities, White I, and Yellow II Required for all Yellow III and Exclusive Use LSA shipments

    33. Proper Shipping Names

    34. Placarding

    35. Package Marking DOT shipping name and UN number Weight (if over 50 kg) Type A or B (if applicable) Certification or specification (if applicable) Radioactive-LSA (if LSA) Name and address of consignor and consignee

    36. Radioactive Material Accidents Few HazMat incidents will involve radioactive materials Handling incidents are most likely Most probable transport accident is on the highway Large releases are very unlikely

    37. Shipping Documents Proper DOT shipping name Class of hazardous material UN or NA identification number Total quantity Name of each radionuclide Physical and chemical form Activity in each package Category or label on each package Transport index for Yellow II and Yellow III

    38. Package Marking DOT Shipping Name and UN Number Weight (if over 50 kg) Type A or Type B (if applicable) Certification or specification (if applicable) Radioactive LSA (if LSA) Name and Address of Consignor/Consignee

    39. Monitoring for Radiation Levels Non-Exclusive Use Package

    42. Monitoring for Radiation Levels Exclusive Use Vehicle

    46. Radiation Levels on Exclusive Use Shipments

    47. External Features Security Seal General adequacy of package Blocking and bracing