bridging the gap between traditional functional strength training n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Bridging The Gap Between Traditional & Functional Strength Training PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Bridging The Gap Between Traditional & Functional Strength Training

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 11

Bridging The Gap Between Traditional & Functional Strength Training - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 98 Views
  • Uploaded on

Bridging The Gap Between Traditional & Functional Strength Training. Jack F. Parker Jr. NSCA-CSCS ACSM-HFS USAT Level 1 Coach. Theories of Strength Training.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Bridging The Gap Between Traditional & Functional Strength Training' - calum


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
bridging the gap between traditional functional strength training

Bridging The Gap Between Traditional & Functional Strength Training

Jack F. Parker Jr.

NSCA-CSCS

ACSM-HFS

USAT Level 1 Coach

theories of strength training
Theories of Strength Training
  • Athletes inherit traits and talents to perform certain activities. Athletic ability is mostly genetic; but certain factors can be influenced through strength training and sport specific focuses. Three important factors can be altered; strength, speed and endurance.
    • Tudor O. Bumpa Periodization Training for Sports
  • Strength training for endurance athletes can be utilized for 3 factors; Injury Prevention, Health Maintenance and Performance Enhancement.
high intensity training
High-Intensity Training
  • High Training Loads Through Out the Year.
    • All Sets Performed to Volitional Fatigue.
    • Training Sessions Can Be Achieved in 20 to 40 Minutes of Training.
    • Not Organized With Competition/Training Schedule.
periodization of strength
Periodization of Strength
  • The Focus of Your Strength Training Should Be to Elicit a Specific Response
    • Start Power, Sprinting, Hills, Recovery
  • Planning Should Match The Current Sport-Specific Training Cycle
    • ME, SpdE, Power, LacT
  • Programs Typically Follow a Cycled Schedule
    • Macro-Cycle, Meso-Cycle, Micro-Cycle
strength training and motor recruitment
Strength Training and Motor Recruitment
  • Development of Dominant Abilities Directly or Indirectly Affects Other Abilities.
    • Depends on Resemblance Between the Methods Utilized and Sports Specifics.
    • Development of Dominant Bio-motor Abilities Rarely Negatively Transfers.
  • Unfound Theories;
    • Strength Training Slows Athletes
    • Strength Training Affects Endurance and Flexibility
program principle
Program Principle
  • Developing Personal Training Principles Insure Strength Training Periodization Adapts Body to Racing Needs;
    • Joint Flexibility
      • Increased ROM = Long Levers
        • Newton’s Second Law
    • Ligament and Tendon Strength
      • Muscle Development vs Attachment Development
    • Core Stability
      • Better Balance = Better Stream Line
    • Develop Stabilizers
    • Train Movements not Isolation Lifts
      • Focus of Functional Strength Training
program design refer to slide 4
Program Design (Refer to Slide 4)
  • Macro-Cycles
    • Program Should Peak at ‘A’ Priority Race
    • Reduce Volume for ‘B’ Priority Race
    • Train Through ‘C’ Priority Races
  • Meso-Cycles
    • Typical Model is 3 Weeks of Build, 1 Week Of Pre-Hab, Stability and Core
      • Recovery Week Encourages Super-Compensation
  • Micro-Cycles
    • Each Day Should Differ; ex. Strength/Power, High Rep, Functional
strength power day traditional focus
Strength/Power Day (Traditional Focus)
  • 2 Different Sets
    • Single Leg - 2 or 3 Sets of High Reps (20 to 30)
      • ROM is Important, Hands/Feet Should be in 3 to 4 different Angles
      • Recovery; 10 to 20 seconds
    • Both Legs - 4 to 5 Sets of Reps (5 to 15)
      • ROM is Relative to Race Position
      • Recovery; 1 to 5 minutes
  • Pull to Push Ration 2:1 or 3:1
  • Traditional Olympic Lifts
  • Jump Rope to Recover
high reps vomit factor
High Reps (Vomit Factor)
  • Sets
    • ≥ 20 Reps or For Time
    • Supersets (Agonist/Antagonist) or Compound Sets (Agonist/Agonist)
  • Corrective & Functional Warm Up
    • Small Circuits Traditional, Balance, Functional
      • Multi-Plane Elements
      • Timed Sessions
high reps cont
High Reps (cont.)
  • Equipment
    • Bosu Ball
    • Bands
    • Medicine/Exercise Balls
  • Balance Progressions
    • Dumb Bells, Bands, Body Weight
    • Base = Any Body Part Anchored, Support = Feet/Hands
    • Double Support, Single Support, Unstable-Double, Unstable-Single, Unstable-Double, Unstable-Single
functional tactical
Functional (Tactical)
  • Sets are Based on Time
    • 3 to 5 Minute Intervals
      • Low-Med Weight, High Reps
    • No Rest Between Stations
  • Dynamic Warm Up is A Must
    • Do Not Static Stretch, Power Will Be Reduced by 40% for Up to 45 Minutes
  • Combinations of Activities are Key; Body Weight, Equipment, Balance, Bands, Rotary
  • Focus on Race Specific Limiters