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Preparing Teacher Candidates and Faculty to address Academic Language. Colin Haysman , Stanford University Laura Hill-Bonnet, Stanford University. Introduction and Goals. Our goals for you: Raise awareness and understanding of Academic Language (AL) across a variety of content areas

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preparing teacher candidates and faculty to address academic language

Preparing Teacher Candidates and Faculty to addressAcademic Language

Colin Haysman, Stanford University

Laura Hill-Bonnet, Stanford University

introduction and goals
Introduction and Goals
  • Our goals for you:
    • Raise awareness and understanding of Academic Language (AL) across a variety of content areas
    • To experience identifying AL demands and objectives
    • To be better able to prepare your teacher candidates in addressing AL in their own teaching
introduction and goals1
Introduction and Goals
  • Teacher Candidates (TCs) will need to determine:
    • their students’ language proficiencies within an additive framing (what they CAN do linguistically)
    • the language demands for the learning segment they are teaching
    • how to support all students in meeting those language demands
introduction first steps
Introduction– First Steps
  • Our premise is that in order for TCs to be able to do these 3 things, we must first begin with
    • A context
    • Some [state] standard
    • And a solid learning objective….
conjuring a context
Conjuring a Context
  • Think of some recent teaching context
    • One in which you have [recently] taught…
    • One in which your supervisees currently teach…
  • Try to be as specific as you can in thinking about the language proficiencies of the students in this class.
  • Share with your group & collectively decide on a context to use for this activity
ca content standards
CA Content Standards
  • Take a look at the task card and resources card. (You have already done tasks 1 & 2!)
  • Complete task 3.
what makes an effective learning objective
What makes an effective learning objective?
  • An effective learning objective:
    • Addresses a content standard
    • Is specific
    • Is measureable and/or observable
    • Includes “doing” verbs
      • (see handout)
writing a learning objective
Writing a learning objective
  • CA H/SS 10.5.4
    • Understand the nature of the WWI
  • Students will be able to evaluate the causes of the 1st World War in writing.
  • Complete task 4
tcs are asked to
TCs are asked to:
  • Consider language demands associated with content understandings in the learning segment. These include the oral and written academic language that students will need to understand or produce in your learning segment.
  • Identify the key academic language demand and explain why it is integral to the central focus for the segment and appropriate to students’ academic language development.
  • Consider language functions and language forms, essential vocabulary, symbols, and/or phrases for the concepts and skills being taught, and instructional language necessary for students to understand or produce oral and/or written language within learning tasks and activities.
slide10

Language Demands

(lesson components that are challenging)

Language Functions

(what we ask students to DO in those challenging components)

Language Forms

(linguistic structures of those functions)

functions genres purposes
Functions(genres/purposes)
  • The tasks or purposes AND uses of language.
  • We use language to accomplish something in formal or informal settings, for social or academic purposes.
  • Social purposes include: exchanging greetings, expressing needs, making jokes, indicating agreement or disagreement, participating in personal conversations, etc.
academic language functions chamot and o malley 1974
Academic Language FunctionsChamot and O’Malley, 1974
  • Seek Information - use who, what, when, where, how
  • Inform - recount information or retell
  • Compare - explain graphic organizer showing contrast
  • Order - describe timeline, continuum or cycle
  • Classify - describe organizing principles
  • Analyze - describe features or main idea
  • Infer - generate hypotheses to suggest cause/outcomes
  • Justify & Persuade - give evidence why “A” is important
  • Solve Problems - describe problem-solving procedures
  • Synthesize - summarize information cohesively
  • Evaluate - identify criteria, explain priorities, etc.
forms linguistic structures
Forms (linguistic structures)
  • Content-specific vocabulary
  • The words that hold our language together and are essential to comprehension. They are words that determine relationships between and among words.
for example
For example…
  • Connecting words: because, then, but, sometimes, before, therefore, however and whereas
  • Prepositions and prepositional phrases: on, in, under, behind, next to, in front of, between, among and in the background
  • Basic regular and irregular verbs: leave, live, eat, use, saw, and went
  • Pronouns: she, he, his, their, it, each other, and themselves
  • Academic vocabulary:notice, think, analyze, plan, compare, proof, and characteristics
making learning objectives into language objectives
Making learning objectives into language objectives
  • CA H/SS 10.5.4
    • Understand the nature of the WWI
  • Students will be able toevaluatethe causes of the 1st World War in writing.
  • Students will be able to use sentence structures that include phrases such as “more important than,” and “on the one hand...,” “however.”
identifying al functions and forms
Identifying AL Functions and Forms
  • To identify the key AL demands we ask credential candidates to think about the following areas of their lesson plans:
  • Learning objectives (look at the verb)
  • Assessment
identifying al functions and forms1
Identifying AL Functions and Forms
  • What is it that you want students to do/read/write/say/draw?
  • Say/write/draft what an “appropriate” student response might be.
  • What content words does it contain?
  • What grammatical structures does it contain?
example
Example:
  • Content Standard:
    • Grade One, Reading
      • 2.7 Retell the central ideas of simple expository or narrative passages.
  • Learning objective:
    • Given a read-aloud of “The Little Red Hen,” students will be able to retell key events in the story.
  • Language objective (key language demand):
    • Students will be able to use regular and irregular past-tense verbs to retell the story.
      • “The Little Red Hen [found, planted, harvested, ground, baked] a grain of wheat.”
al in pact
AL in PACT
  • Complete task 5
  • Your questions?
thank you

Thank you!!

chaysman@stanford.edu

laurahb1@stanford.edu