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School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports: Overview Presented by: Milt McKenna. Horner & Sugai OSEP Center on PBIS Universities of Oregon & Connecticut. My job today…. To describe features of a systems approach to Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS)

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school wide positive behavioral interventions supports overview presented by milt mckenna

School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports: OverviewPresented by: Milt McKenna

Horner & Sugai

OSEP Center on PBIS

Universities of Oregon & Connecticut

my job today
My job today…

To describe features of a systems approach to

Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS)

“BIG IDEAS”

SET UP for Action Planning

trained schools by cohort

PBIS

Maryland

Trained Schools by Cohort

14,325 Schools Adopting

School-wide PBIS

Feb 2011

slide6

So,….what is PBIS?

School Wide PBIS is:

A Frameworkfor enhancing

adoption & implementation of a

Continuum of evidence-based

Interventions to achieve

Academically and behaviorally

Important outcomes for

ALL students.

Not a specific practice or

curriculum…it’s a

general approach

to preventing

problem behavior

Not new…it’s based on

long history of

behavioral practices &

effective instructional

design & strategies

Not limited to any

particular group of

students…it’s

for all students

what does pbis look like in a school
What does PBIS look like in a school?
  • >80% of studentscan tell you what is expected of them & can give behavioral examples because they have been taught, actively supervised, practiced, & acknowledged.
  • Positive adult-to-student interactions exceed negative.
  • Administratorsare active participants.
  • Data & team-basedaction planning & implementation.
  • Function based behavior supportis a foundation for addressing problem behavior.
  • Full continuum of behavior supportis available to all students.
a main message
A Main Message

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

Good Teaching

Behavior Management

Increasing District & State Competency and Capacity

Investing in Outcomes, Data, Practices, and Systems

core principles of pbis
Core Principles of PBIS
  • We can:
    • Teach all children
    • Intervene early
    • Use a multi-tier, problem solving model
    • Use research-based, scientifically validated interventions and strategies
    • Monitor student progress
    • Use data to adjust instruction
    • Use continual assessment:
      • universal screening, progress monitoring and diagnostics
the prognosis
The Prognosis
  • Students with academic failure and problem behaviors likely will drop out of school and:
    • be involved with the corrections system
    • be single parents
    • be involved with the social services system
    • be unemployed
    • be involved in automobile accidents
    • use illicit drugs

Centers for Disease Control, 1993Duncan, Forness, & Hartsough, 1995Carson, Sittlington, & Frank, 1995Wagner, D’Amico, Marder, Newman, Blackorby, 1992Jay & Padilla, 1987Bullis & Gaylord-Ross, 1991

competing inter related national goals

Challenge # 5

Competing, Inter-related National Goals
  • Improve literacy, math, geography, science, etc.
  • Make schools safe, caring, & focused on teaching & learning
  • Improve student character & citizenship
  • Eliminate bullying
  • Prevent drug use
  • Prepare for postsecondary education
  • Provide a free & appropriate education for all
  • Prepare viable workforce
  • Affect rates of high risk, antisocial behavior
  • Leave no child behind
  • Etc….
slide17

Challenge # 6

The key is not to prioritize what's on your schedule, but to schedule your priorities.”

Steven Covey

challenges cont
Not enough time

Too much talk…not enough action

Unclear outcomes

Too few priorities

Too many priorities

Too many opinions

Multiple competing experts

No experts

Too many diverse perspectives

Too much redundancy

Done it before

Never done it before

Lack of clear outcomes

Slow to get started

Unstructured

Unresolved conflicts

………

Challenges (cont.)
worry 1
Worry # 1
  • Too much to do
  • We add more and more each year
  • Nothing is taken away (stop doing this!)
  • How can we be better prepared to integrate into existing programs?
worry 2 teaching by getting tough
Worry # 2“TEACHING” by Getting Tough

If Russell Still

doesn’t improve, we

get REAL TOUGH

& enforce

BOTTOM LINE!

Russell: “I hate this f____ing school, & you’re a dumbf_____.”

If Russell doesn’t

improve, we get

TOUGHER

Teacher: “Russell, that is disrespectful language. I’m sending you to the office so you’ll learn never to say those words again….starting now!”

common behavior concerns

Staff Behaviors !!

Common Behavior Concerns

Texting and emailing during instruction

Talking during instruction

Eating, drinking and gum chewing

Late arrival, early departure

Starting an activity before listening to the instructions or “set up”

Inappropriate attire

increasingly aversive reactive discipline continuum
Increasingly “aversive” reactive discipline continuum
  • Warning
  • ODR & warning
  • ODR & in-school suspension
  • ODR & out-school suspension
  • Expulsion hearing
erroneous assumptions are that the student
Erroneous assumptions are that the student:
  • Is inherently “bad”
  • Will learn more appropriate behavior through increased use of “aversives”
  • Will be better tomorrow…….
do sanctions work
Do Sanctions “work”?
  • Sanctions such as office referrals or suspensions may appear to “work” in the short term
    • Removes student
    • Provides relief to teachers, peers, administrator
    • We often attribute responsibility for change to student &/or others (family)

Jeffrey Sprague, Ph.D. (jeffs@uoregon.edu)

science of behavior has taught us that children
Science of behavior has taught us that children….
  • Are NOT born with “bad behaviors”
  • Do NOTlearn when presented with aversive consequences
  • Do learn better ways of behaving by being taught directly & receiving positive feedback - (REINFORCEMENT)
assumptions
ASSUMPTIONS
  • BEHAVIOR is learned
  • BEHAVIOR is teachable
  • BEHAVIOR occurrence is affected by the environment
  • BEHAVIOR is changeable
  • BEHAVIOR is more likely if effective, efficient, and reinforced
non examples of function based approach

ALL BEHAVIORS SERVE SOME FUNCTION

Non-examples of Function-Based approach

“Function” = outcome, result, purpose, consequence

  • “Russell, you skipped 2 school days, so we’re going to suspend you for 2 more.”
  • “Jason, I’m taking your book away because you obviously aren’t ready to learn.”
  • “You want my attention?! I’ll show you attention, …let’s take a walk down to the office & have a little chat with the Principal.”
slide30

PBIS Systems Implementation Logic

Visibility

Political Support

Funding

Leadership Team

Active Coordination

Evaluation

Training

Coaching

Local School Teams/Demonstrations

big ideas
BIG IDEAS
  • 3-5 years
  • Organizational Framework
  • Critical Features same across schools
    • unique to the culture of the school
  • System investment in Coaching Capacity
slide32

Supporting Social Competence &

Academic Achievement

PBIS

OUTCOMES

Supporting

Staff Behavior

Supporting

Decision

Making

DATA

SYSTEMS

PRACTICES

Supporting

Student Behavior

slide33

Tertiary Prevention:

Specialized

Individualized

Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior

CONTINUUM OF

SCHOOL-WIDE

PBIS

~5%

Secondary Prevention:

Specialized Group

Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior

~15%

APPLYING TRIANGLE LOGIC TO ADULT BEHAVIOR

Primary Prevention:

School-/Classroom-

Wide Systems for

All Students,

Staff, & Settings

~80% of Students

maryland s tiered instructional and positive behavioral interventions and supports pbis framework

Behavioral Systems

Academic Systems

  • Intensive, Individually Designed Interventions
  • Strategies to address needs of individual students with intensive needs
  • Function-based assessments
  • Intense, durable strategies
  • Intensive, Individually Designed Interventions
  • Address individual needs of student
  • Assessment-based
  • High Intensity
  • Targeted, Group Interventions
  • Small, needs-based groups for
  • at risk students who do not respond
  • to universal strategies
  • High efficiency
  • Rapid response
  • Targeted, Group Interventions
  • Small, needs-based groups for at- risk students who do not respond to universal strategies
  • High efficiency/ Rapid response
  • Function-based logic
  • Core Curriculum and
  • Differentiated Instruction
  • All students
  • Preventive, proactive
  • School-wide or classroom
  • systems for ALL students
  • Core Curriculum and
  • Universal Interventions
  • All settings, all students
  • Preventive, proactive
  • School-wide or classroom systems for ALL students and staff
Maryland’s Tiered Instructional and Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) Framework

1-5%

1-5%

5-10%

5-10%

80-90%

80-90%

slide35

The need to enhance environmental structures increases

The frequency for collecting and acting upon information increases

The required resources to address the problem increases

Core Support Program:

Provided to all, intended to reach most.

Continuum of Supports

35

critical features
Critical Features
  • PBIS Team
  • Faculty/Staff Commitment
  • Effective Procedures for Dealing with Discipline
  • Data Entry and Analysis Plan Established
  • Expectations and Rules Developed
  • Reward/Recognition Program Established
  • Lesson Plans for Teaching expectations/rules
  • Implementation Plan
  • Classroom Systems
  • Evaluation
slide37

Team-led Process

Non-Teaching

Family

Behavioral

Capacity

Priority &

Status

Representation

Specialized Support

Administrator

Team

Community

Administrator

Student

Data-based

Decision

Making

Teaching

Communications

Start with

Team that

“Works.”

general implementation process getting started
GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: “Getting Started”

Team

Agreements

Data-based

Action Plan

Evaluation

Implementation

worry 11
Worry # 1
  • Too much to do
  • We add more and more each year
  • Nothing is taken away (stop doing this!)
  • How can we be better prepared to integrate into existing programs?
lessons learned
Lessons Learned

Avoid “Initiative Overload” by aligning efforts for improvement

  • All initiatives tied to core outcomes
  • All initiatives are “evidence-based”
  • All initiatives have proven implementation effectiveness and efficiency
  • All initiatives define the “systems” needed for sustainability
  • All initiatives have efficient measures of fidelity
slide41

Team Led Process - Sample Teaming Matrix

  • Eliminate initiatives that do NOT have a defined purpose and measurable outcome.
  • 2. Combine initiatives that have the same measurable outcome and/or same target group
  • 3. Combine initiatives that have 75% of the same staff
  • 4. Eliminate initiatives that are not tied to School Improvement Goals.

Are outcomes measurable?

slide42

Implementation of Effective Practices with and without an Implementation Support Team

Balas & Boren, 2000; Fixsen, Blase, Timbers, & Wolf, 2001

80 staff buy in
80% Staff Buy In
  • Share/ Present Data
  • Start Small
  • Easy Implementation
  • Showcase Success
what does a reduction of 850 office referrals and 25 suspensions mean kennedy middle school
What does a reduction of 850 office referrals and 25 suspensions mean?Kennedy Middle School
  • Savings in Administrative time
  • ODR = 15 min
  • Suspension = 45 min
  • 13,875 minutes
  • 231 hours
  • 29, 8-hour days
  • Savings in Student Instructional time
  • ODR = 45 min
  • Suspension = 216 min
  • 43,650 minutes
  • 728 hours
  • 121 6-hour school days
slide45

Marketing Strategy

  • Integrate past school behavior plans
  • Assure clarity of target areas
  • Incorporate school colors or mascot

Respectful

Able

Motivated

Safe

create working environments where employees

(Buckingham & Coffman 2002, Gallup)

Create working environments where employees:

1 million workers, 80,000 managers, 400 companies

1. Know what is expected

2. Have materials & equipment to do job correctly

3. Receive recognition each week for good work.

4. Have supervisor who cares, & pays attention

5. Receive encouragement to contribute & improve

6. Can identify person at work who is “best friend.”

7. Feel mission of organization makes them feel like their jobs are important

8. See people around them committed to doing good job

9. Feel like they are learning new things (getting better)

10. Have opportunity to do their job well.

office discipline referral s
Office Discipline Referrals

What is the belief system in your school around Office Referrals?

Why do we complete the referral?

Kid-Teacher-Administrator interaction

Underestimation of actual behavior

Improving usefulness & value

Clear, mutually exclusive, exhaustive definitions

Continuum of behavior support

Positive school-wide foundations

W/in school comparisons

Distinction between office v. classroom managed

slide50

Nuts andBolts

  • Brainstorm classroom vs. office managed behaviors
  • Come to consensus on language to be used
  • Agree on behaviors to list
slide51

Office Managed Behaviors

  • Bomb Threat/False Alarm
  • Possession of a Weapon/Explosive Device
  • Threats of bringing/using Weapons
  • Fighting/Physical Aggression
  • Physical Assault/Harassment
  • Intimidation
  • Sexual Harassment/Sexual Offense
  • Loitering
  • Theft/Burglary
  • Verbal Abuse and/or Threat of Violence
  • Inappropriate Bus Behavior
  • Failure to Identify Oneself
  • Truancy
  • Vandalism/ Property Damage
  • False Fire Alarm or Arson
  • Possession/Distribution/Use of OTC Medication, Controlled Substance, Tobacco, or Alcohol
  • Leaving the Classroom without Permission
  • Forgery/Extortion
  • Staff Managed Behaviors
  • Tardiness (on 3rd tardy, enter student into Response System)
  • Non-compliance with staff direction
  • Classroom disruption
  • Bullying
  • Inappropriate language
  • Failure to serve teacher assigned reflection
  • Unprepared for class
  • Leaving the classroom without permission
  • Skipping class
  • Inappropriate hallway behavior
  • Inappropriate computer use
  • Inappropriate locker behavior
  • Dress code violation
  • Throwing objects
  • Eating/drinking in class
  • Academic dishonesty
  • Sleeping in class
  • Carrying backpack
  • Electronic devices/cell phones (visible and/or on)
slide53

Develop a Process Flow Chart

  • Create a process flow chart to guide all student behavior management.
  • Keep it as simple as possible
  • Keep it as clear as possible
gather information
Gather Information
  • AVAILABLE DATA:
        • Office Referrals,
        • Suspensions,
        • Attendance,
        • Academics
        • SST Referrals
measure and evaluate
Measure and Evaluate

BIG IDEA

  • The staff determine:
    • What questions they want to answer,
    • What data do they need to answer the questions,
    • What is the simplest way to get that data, and then
    • Write an objective for where they want to be in the future.
slide59

Total Office Discipline Referrals (ODR) per Month

LOOKS LIKE OCTOBER WAS A BUSY MONTH

slide61

Pre

Post

slide62

How long would it take to answer the BIG 5 SW discipline questions in your school?

        • Who committed the offense?
        • What did they do?
        • Where did they do it?
        • When did they do it?
        • HowMANY were involved?
slide67

10%

N = 1679 443 163 246

Elementary Middle High K (8-12)

slide68

N = 1679 443 163 246

Elementary Middle High K (8-12)

slide69

+ If many students are making same mistake, consider

changing systems ...not students

+ START by teaching, monitoring & rewarding

…before increasing PUNISHMENT

do we need to tweak our action plan
How often?

Who?

What?

Where?

When?

How much?

If problem,

Which students/staff?

What system?

What intervention?

What outcome?

Do we need to tweak our action plan?
critical features1
Critical Features
  • PBIS Team
  • Faculty/Staff Commitment
  • Effective Procedures for Dealing with Discipline
  • Data Entry and Analysis Plan Established
  • Expectations and Rules Developed
  • Reward/Recognition Program Established
  • Lesson Plans for Teaching expectations/rules
  • Implementation Plan
  • Classroom Systems
  • Evaluation
slide72

School Rules

NO Food

NO Weapons

NO Backpacks

NO Drugs/Smoking

NO Bullying

Redesign Learning & Teaching Environment

slide79

Welcome Rugs

It's The Westwood Way!

slide85

Schoolwide “quick” acknowledgementsRewards that are quickly presented in the presence of the behavior

slide89

Cougar Traits in the Community Student Name __________________________________Displayed the Cougar Trait of: Respect Responsibility Caring Citizenship (Circle the trait you observed)Signature _____________________________________________If you would like to write on the back the details of what you observed feel free! Thank you for supporting our youth.

clever variations
Clever Variations

Bus Bucks

Super Sub Slips

Golden Plunger

G.O.O.S.E.

First-in-Line

Patriot’s Parking Pass

Business Partner Discount

What really matters

Is the positive social

acknowledgement

& interaction!!

slide92

OMMS Business Partner Ticket 6 7 8 Date: ________________Student Name __________________________________For Demonstrating: Safety Ethics Respect (Circle the trait you observed)Comments: ___________________________________________Authorized Signature: ____________________________________Business Name: ________________________________________

Grand Junction CO 5/06

samples
High Fives, Gotchas

Traveling Passport

Super Sub Slips

Bus Bucks

Ravens Bucks

Free homework coupon

Discount school store

Grab bag

Early dismissal/Late arrival

First/last in Line

Video store coupon

Free fries

G.O.O.S.E

1-Free Period

Massage

File stuffer

Coffee Coupon

Golden Plunger

Give Em’ a Hand

Kudos

Positive Office Referrals

Extra dessert

Class event

Samples
discipline works when

Punishment

Reinforcement(success)

Discipline Works When ….

Prevention creates more Positive than Negative consequences

4 : 1

positive office referral
“Positive Office Referral”
  • Balancing positive/negative adult/student contacts in Oregon
  • Procedures
    • Develop equivalent positive referral
    • Process like negative referral
slide99

“DINGER”

  • Reminding staff to have positive interaction
  • Procedures
    • Ring timer on regular, intermittent schedule
    • Engage in quick positive interaction

“GOLDEN PLUNGER”

  • Involve custodian
  • Procedure
    • Custodian selects one classroom/ hallway each week that is clean & orderly
    • Sticks gold-painted plunger with banner on wall

“1 FREE PERIOD”

  • Contributing to a safe, caring, effective school environment
  • Procedures
    • Given by Principal
    • Principal takes over class for one hour
    • Used at any time

“G.O.O.S.E.”

  • “Get Out Of School Early”
    • Or “arrive late”
  • Procedures
    • Kids/staff nominate
    • Kids/staff reward, then pick
slide101

My School’s

Expectations…

1. Be Safe

2. Be Responsible

3. Be Respectful

Once you have developed school-wide expectations, it is not enough to just post the words on the walls of the building …

YOU MUST TEACH THEM!

slide102

“If a child doesn’t know how to read, we teach.”

“If a child doesn’t know how to swim, we teach.”

“If a child doesn’t know how to multiply, we teach.”

“If a child doesn’t know how to drive, we teach.”

“If a child doesn’t know how to behave, we…

…teach? …punish?”

“Why can’t we finish the last sentence as automatically as we do the others?”

(Herner, 1998)

teaching routines
TEACHING ROUTINES
  • What does the ROUTINElook/sound like?
  • Where/when should the ROUTINE be used?
  • Where/when will the ROUTINE be taught & for how long?
  • How & when will the ROUTINE be practiced?
  • How will learning be confirmed?
  • How, when & how often will appropriate displays of ROUTINE be acknowledged?
teaching sw expectations frms opening day
Teaching SW ExpectationsFRMS “Opening Day”
  • Teach directly in context (“teaching stations”)
    • See/model
    • Practice
    • Acknowledge
  • 2 day intensive by all staff/students
  • Regular weekly/monthly review
teaching matrix activity
Teaching Matrix Activity

Classroom

Lunchroom

Bus

Hallway

Assembly

Respect Others

  • Use inside voice
  • ________
  • Eat your own food
  • __________
  • Stay in your seat
  • _________
  • Stay to right
  • _________
  • Arrive on time to speaker
  • __________

Respect Environment & Property

  • Recycle paper
  • _________
  • Return trays
  • __________
  • Keep feet on floor
  • __________
  • Put trash in cans
  • _________
  • Take litter with you
  • __________

Respect Yourself

  • Do your best
  • __________
  • Wash your hands
  • __________
  • Be at stop on time
  • __________
  • Use your words
  • __________
  • Listen to speaker
  • __________

Respect Learning

  • Have materials ready
  • __________
  • Eat balanced diet
  • __________
  • Go directly from bus to class
  • __________
  • Go directly to class
  • __________
  • Discuss topic in class w/ others
  • __________

Stated in a Positive way

What do you want them to do!

slide107

Hammond Middle School

PRIDE- 6th Grade Lessons

P-Prepared to learn R-Responsible for actions I- pursue Integrity D-Directions Followed E-Earn and Give Respect

Objective: Direct teaching of PRIDE and other related social skills necessary for successful implementation.

Target Group: The entire student population

Strategy: During the first week of school, PRIDE and its five components will be introduced in 10-20 minute mini-lessons.

Lesson One: Lesson One: School Assembly in Gym

Day: Monday, August 28h

Time: TBA

A. Administration will present the PRIDE program to students.

Lesson Two: Introduction to PRIDE

Day: Monday, August 28th

Time: A1

A Introduce PRIDE to the students .

B. Introduce new yellow poster. Explain how the entire school has PRIDE.

C. Introduce PRIDE slips. Discuss rewards (use overhead).

D. Discuss Levels and introduce MIR Slips (use overhead)

All teachers will refer to PRIDE throughout the day.

Lesson Three: Prepared to learn

Day: Monday, August 28th

Time: A3

A. Ask students if they remember what the P stands for in PRIDE.

B. Explain today we will be discussing what being prepared means in various locations of Hammond Middle.

C. Separate students into small groups. Explain to each group they will receive a location at Hammond Middle and they will need to come up with descriptors of what it means to be prepared. (USE CHART PAPER. LOCATIONS ARE: CLASSROOM, HALLWAY, RECESS, CAFTERIA, AND BUS)

D. Model an example to the students.

E. Have students present ideas to class.

F. Summarize lesson with class.

All teachers will refer to PRIDE throughout the day.

traveling passports
“Traveling Passports”
  • Pre-correcting new kids in Tigard, Oregon
  • Procedures
    • Meet with key adults
    • Review expectations
    • Go to class
pbis matrix for home
.PBIS Matrix for Home
  • I am respectful Listen to my parents
  • Be truthful to my parents
  • Play cooperatively
  • Speak nicely to others
  • I am responsible Put away my toys, bike, and equipment
  • Help with jobs at home
  • Follow my parents’ directions
  • Share Thursday folder with parents
  • I am safe Play safely with others
  • Stay in designated areas
  • Stay away from strangers
  • Wear bike helmet and equipment
  • I am prepared Finish homework and share with parent
  • Pack backpack at night for school the next day
  • Go to bed on time
  • Get up and get ready for school when called
slide114

Triangle Activity:

Applying the Three-Tiered Logic to Your School

Tier 3

Tier 2

Tier 1

improving decision making
Improving Decision-Making

Solution

From

Problem

Information

Problem

Solving

To

Solution

Problem

Information

slide116

Using Your Action Plan

  • Organize/record your SW PBIS process
  • Keep a record of what has been completed
  • Keep a record of what needs to be addressed
  • Critical Elements guides the process
  • What happens when you get back to your school?
  • You may feel as though you are building your airplane in flight!!
activities
Activities
  • Initial SWPBIS Meetings
  • Training the Staff
    • When should training occur?
    • Who should attend?
    • How long should it last?
    • Who should conduct the training?
  • Introducing SWPBIS to Students
  • Introducing SWPBIS to Families
  • Other Considerations
    • New Staff Members
    • New Students
    • Booster Trainings
slide118

August

Monthly Activity Checklist

reviewing strive for five
Reviewing Strive for Five

Involve Students

  • Be respectful.
  • Be safe.
  • Work peacefully.
  • Strive for excellence.
  • Follow directions.
theme of the month
Theme of The Month
  • September = Respectful
  • October = Responsible
  • November = Ready
  • Etc. Etc.
slide121

SWPBIS

Subsystems

School-wide

Classroom

Family

Non-classroom

Student

procedures and routines
Procedures and Routines
  • Define and teach classroom routines
      • How to enter class and begin to work
      • How to predict the schedule for the day
      • What to do if you do not have materials
      • What to do if you need help
      • What to do if you need to go to the bathroom
      • What to do if you are handing in late material
      • What to do if someone is bothering you.
      • Signals for moving through different activities.
        • “Show me you are listening”
  • Establish a signal for obtaining class attention
  • Teach effective transitions.
slide124

Challenge # 3

Are systems in place to respond to the needs of students like Russell?

slide125

Does the classroom have a range of consequences /interventions for problem behavior that are documented and consistently delivered?

Challenge # 4

school teams will be successful if
School teams will be successful if:
  • They start with sufficient resources and commitment
  • They focus on the smallest changes that will result in the biggest difference
  • They have a clear action plan
  • They use on-going self-assessment to determine if they are achieving their plan
  • They have access to an external agent/ coach who is supportive, knowledgeable and persistent.
slide128

Team Managed

Staff

Acknowledgements

Effective

Practices

Implementation

Continuous

Monitoring

Administrator

Participation

Staff Training

& Support

slide129

Relevant &

Measurable

Indicators

Team-based

Decision Making &

Planning

Efficient

Input, Storage, &

Retrieval

Evaluation

Effective

Visual Displays

Continuous

Monitoring

Regular

Review

slide130

Pre

Post

mom dad auntie jason
“Mom, Dad, Auntie, & Jason”

In a school where over 45% of 400 elem. students receive free-reduced lunch, >750 family members attended Family Fun Night.

i like working at this school
I like working at this school

After implementing SW-PBS, Principal at Jesse Bobo Elementary reports that teacher absences dropped from 414 (2002-2003) to 263 (2003-2004).

Over past 3 years, 0 teacher requests for transfers

she can read
“She can read!”

With minutes reclaimed from improvements in proactive SW discipline, elementary school invests in improving school-wide literacy.

Result: >85% of students in 3rd grade are reading at/above grade level.

we found some minutes
“We found some minutes?”

After reducing their office discipline referrals from 400 to 100, middle school students requiring individualized, specialized behavior intervention plans decreased from 35 to 6.

pbis messages
PBIS Messages
  • Measurable & justifiable outcomes
  • On-going data-based decision making
  • Evidence-based practices
  • Systems ensuring durable, high fidelity of implementation
some final thoughts

Some Final Thoughts

On your Road to Success

remember
Remember
  • We can’t “make” students learn or behave
  • We can create environments to increase the likelihood students learn and behave
  • Environments that increase the likelihood are guided by a core curriculum and implemented with consistency and fidelity
resources
Resources
  • www.pbis.org
  • www.pbismaryland.org
  • www.swis.org
  • mmckenna@msde.state.md.us