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Mass Depopulation & Euthanasia
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  1. Mass Depopulation & Euthanasia Overview Adapted from the FAD PReP/NAHEMS Guidelines: Mass Depopulation and Euthanasia (2011)

  2. Euthanasia and Depopulation FAD PReP/NAHEMS Guidelines: MDE - Overview Prevent or mitigate disease spread Remove contaminated livestock Protect agriculture and national economy Safeguard public health

  3. Euthanasia Goals FAD PReP/NAHEMS Guidelines: MDE - Overview Provide humane treatment Select acceptable methods Minimize negative emotional impact Safeguard the food chain Prevent or mitigate disease spread

  4. Euthanasia and Depopulation FAD PReP/NAHEMS Guidelines: MDE - Overview • Euthanasia • Painless and stress free as possible • Mass Depopulation • Many animals • Quick and efficient • Welfare is considered

  5. Euthanasia Group FAD PReP/NAHEMS Guidelines: MDE - Overview Provides advice and recommendations Notifies owners/operators Coordinates with Logistics Section Coordinates essential decisions

  6. Interaction and Collaboration FAD PReP/NAHEMS Guidelines: MDE - Overview Multi-group interaction Determines depopulation methods Extent of depopulation Comply with AVMA and OIE when possible

  7. Safety Considerations FAD PReP/NAHEMS Guidelines: MDE - Overview Animal size and body weight Species temperament Familiarity and comfort with humans Dangerous animals Restraint methods/equipment Euthanasia methods/equipment

  8. Training and Briefings FAD PReP/NAHEMS Guidelines: MDE - Overview • Must be properly trained • Just-in-time training (if necessary) • Briefings • Safety requirements • Site conditions • Specific tasks

  9. General Considerations FAD PReP/NAHEMS Guidelines: MDE - Overview Humane Aesthetic Psychological Documentation

  10. Animal Welfare Issues FAD PReP/NAHEMS Guidelines: MDE - Overview • Euthanasia group works to: • Ensure animals are appropriately housed, maintained, euthanized • Consult on animal welfare issues • Make effort to comply with counsel of APHIS Animal Welfare personnel

  11. Methods FAD PReP/NAHEMS Guidelines: MDE - Overview • Physical • Often preferred • Must be skilled • Requires extreme caution • Chemical • Often not practical • For unique circumstances • Positive public perception

  12. Methods (cont’d) FAD PReP/NAHEMS Guidelines: MDE - Overview • Physical • Captive bolt • Gunshot • Blunt Trauma • Electrocution • Chemical • Noninhalants • Inhalants

  13. Method Selection FAD PReP/NAHEMS Guidelines: MDE - Overview Available personnel Disease Safety Biosecurity issues Compatibility Premises location Number of animals

  14. Method Selection (cont’d) FAD PReP/NAHEMS Guidelines: MDE - Overview Psychological effect Location/size/weight/species Facilities Post-euthanasia plans

  15. For More Information FAD PReP/NAHEMS Guidelines: MDE - Overview • FAD PReP/NAHEMS Guidelines& SOP: Mass Depopulationand Euthanasia (MDE) (2011) • http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/emergency_management/ • MDE web-based training module • http://naherc.sws.iastate.edu/

  16. Guidelines Content FAD PReP/NAHEMS Guidelines: MDE - Overview Authors (CFSPH): • ReneéDewell DVM,MS • Nichollette Rider, Veterinary Student Significant contributions to the content were provided by USDA APHIS VS: • Lori P. Miller, PE • Darrel K. Styles, DVM, PhD

  17. Acknowledgments Development of this presentation was by the Center for Food Security and Public Health at Iowa State University through funding from the USDA APHIS Veterinary Services PPT Authors: Dawn Bailey, BS; Kerry Leedom Larson, DVM, MPH, PhD, DACVPM Reviewers: Glenda Dvorak, DVM, MPH, DACVPM: Cheryl L. Eia, JD, DVM, MPH, Patricia Futoma, BS, Veterinary Student, ReneéDewell DVM,MS