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Developing School Community Partnerships for Student Success

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  1. Developing School Community Partnerships for Student Success April 29, 2014 / Wenatchee, WA Fred Schrumpf, Director of On-Time Graduation, Spokane Public Schools Lyndia Wilson, Division Director, Spokane Regional Health District Alisa D. May, Executive Director, Priority Spokane

  2. Learning Goals • How have community partnerships developed with Spokane Public Schools (SPS)? • What strategies are used by SPS and partner organizations to address risk factors? • Towards what policy and system changes is our community working?

  3. One in three students DROP OUT in Spokane County! Vote Yes for Spokane’s Children’s Fund Initiative (2010)

  4. Components of Building Partnerships

  5. Who are we? And why do we partner with SPS?

  6. www.priorityspokane.org

  7. Guidelines Used: • Magnitude affected • Below a benchmark or want to preserve • Impacts several aspects of community life • Actionable in next 5 years

  8. So…WHY is Public Health involved in educational attainment efforts?

  9. Health Disparities: Differences in the incidence, prevalence, mortality, and burden of diseases and other adverse health conditions that exist among specific population groups.

  10. Many of the root causes of community health problems are linked to SOCIAL DETERMINANTS. Social Determinants: Factors in our social and economic environment that have been found to affect health, either negatively or positively. H– HOUSING E – EDUCATION A – ACCESS (to healthy food, parks, sidewalks, safe neighborhoods) L – LABOR (available jobs and the skills to be hired and succeed) T – TRANSPORTATION H – HEALTHCARE

  11. Cardiovascular Disease by Education Data Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 2005-2009

  12. Public health assessment and evaluation capacity

  13. Gonzaga University Middle School Evidence –Based Practice Study (June 2010) • Eastern Washington University • Youth Serving Programs (2011)

  14. Dr. Mary Beth Celio Study (May 2012) • Longitudinal study • 7,000 Spokane Public School students Of the dropouts that could be predicted, 46% could have been identified before they entered high school.

  15. Most Significant Dropout Early Warning/Risk Indicators

  16. Community Breakfast May 2012

  17. New attitude of collaboration developed through School Community Partnership Committee

  18. EARLY WARNING SYSTEM View of the Early Warning System School Dashboard • Unexcused Absences • 4+ in 7th grade • 4+ in 8thgrade • Out-of-school Discipline • In 7th grade • in 8th grade • Course Failure • F in 8th grade • F in 7thgrade • Academic Assessments • Low Math • Low Reading

  19. Data Sharing for Partnership Building 2012-13 Tipping Points for 7th and 8th Graders How does your program impact Attendance, Behavior, Course Completion or more than one of these factors? How does your organization currently use data? What data do WE ALL want to keep an eye on in order to serve our kids in ways that support student well-being and success?

  20. 39 Community Based Organizations with MOUs or Annual Reports

  21. Examples of School Community Strategies • Community Attendance Support Teams (CAST)

  22. Students with 4+ Unexcused Absences who Graduated from SPS

  23. Examples of School Community Strategies • Weaving Bright Futures – Spokane Regional Health District

  24. Examples of School Community Strategies • Inland Northwest Community Foundation’s project with Shaw and Garry Middle Schools

  25. Policy and System Implications for Attendance Starting local . . . • Standardizing attendance practice in schools • Intervening at 4 unexcused absences • Considering all absences regardless of excused or unexcused (chronic absences) • Increasing awareness of importance of attendance based on research • Expanding from 6 middles schools to district, county, and state

  26. Today we discussed: • How community partnerships developed with Spokane Public Schools. • Strategies used by SPS and partner organizations to address risk factors. • Examples of policy and system changes on which our community is working. Do you have questions for us?

  27. Contact information: Fred Schrumpf, Director On-Time Graduation Spokane Public Schools freds@spokaneschools.org www.spokaneschools.org Alisa D. May, Executive Director Priority Spokane priorityspokane@greaterspokane.org www.priorityspokane.org Lyndia Wilson, Division Director Spokane Regional Health District lwilson@srhd.org www.srhd.org