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Types of Narrative Writing. First. Next. Then. Personal Experience. Imaginative. After that. Last. “Intriguing Adventure” Structure. Problem/ Solution Structure. Organized Chronologically. Organized Categorically. Pirates of the Caribbean. Heat Wave by Helen Ketterman.

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slide2

Types of Narrative Writing

First

Next

Then

Personal

Experience

Imaginative

After that

Last

“Intriguing

Adventure”

Structure

Problem/

Solution

Structure

Organized

Chronologically

Organized

Categorically

Pirates of the

Caribbean

Heat Wave

by Helen

Ketterman

Sunshine

Home by

Eve Bunting

When I Was

Young in the

Mountains by

Cynthia Rylant

Meanwhile

Back at the Ranch

by Trinka

Hakes Noble

A Bad Case

of Stripes

by David

Shannon

The Principal

from the

Black Lagoon

by Mike Thaler

The Cow Who

Wouldn’t

Come Down by

Paul Brett Johnson

Page 307

2

slide3

Where to Begin?

Read and highlight the

first paragraph on page 349

The

Imaginative Narrative

Second Grade

(pp. 319 – 331)

3

the imaginative narrative in second grade
The Imaginative Narrative in Second Grade

Has a Problem/Solution organizational structure

Instruction begins with exploring Problem/Solution literature

Focus is on a logical sequence of events directed at solving a problem

Includes details, descriptive language, transition words, openings and closings

4

slide5

The Stages of Teaching

the Imaginative Narrative

in Second Grade

Explore

Problem/Solution

Imaginative

Literature

to determine the

text structures

5

slide8

Examples of some

Problem/Solution

Literature

Page 320

8

slide9

The Stages of Teaching

the Imaginative Narrative

in Second Grade

Explore

Problem/Solution

Imaginative

Literature

to determine the

text structures

Make a

Problem/Solution

Imaginative

Narrative Plan

based on a

prompt

9

slide11

The Stages of Teaching

the Imaginative Narrative

in Second Grade

Explore

Problem/Solution

Imaginative

Literature

to determine the

text structures

Make a

Problem/Solution

Imaginative

Narrative Plan

based on a

prompt

Teacher

models

creating the

Imaginative

Narrative

11

slide12

Read about Modeling the

Imaginative Narrative

in Second Grade

(pp. 322 – 326)

12

slide13

The Stages of Teaching

the Imaginative Narrative

in Second Grade

Explore

Problem/Solution

Imaginative

Literature

to determine the

text structures

Make a

Problem/Solution

Imaginative

Narrative Plan

based on a

prompt

Teacher

models

creating the

Imaginative

Narrative

Students Create

Imaginative

Narratives and

teacher assesses

using rubric

13

slide14

Review the Second Grade

Imaginative Narrative

Rubric

(pp. 327 – 331)

14

the imaginative narrative in third grade
The Imaginative Narrative in Third Grade

Has either a Problem/Solution organizational structure or an Intriguing Adventure organizational structure

Instruction begins with reviewing the Problem/Solution structure and then exploring literature organized as an Intriguing Adventure

Focus is either on (1) a logical sequence of events directed at solving a problem or (2) a sequence of events focused on overcoming obstacles or (3) a series of events that increase in intensity through the use of humor, suspense/tension, or drama

Includes details, descriptive language, transition words, openings and closings

15

slide16

The Stages of Teaching

the Imaginative Narrative

in Third Grade

Review the

Organizational

Structure of the

Problem/Solution

Imaginative

Narrative

16

slide17

The Stages of Teaching

the Imaginative Narrative

in Third Grade

Review the

Organizational

Structure of the

Problem/Solution

Imaginative

Narrative

Explore

Intriguing

Adventure

Literature

to determine the

text structures

17

slide18

Discuss the presence of

humor, suspense/tension,

and/or drama

Page 333

18

slide19

Examples of some

Intriguing Adventure

Literature

Page 334

19

slide20

The Stages of Teaching

the Imaginative Narrative

in Third Grade

Review the

Organizational

Structure of the

Problem/Solution

Imaginative

Narrative

Explore

Intriguing

Adventure

Literature

to determine the

text structures

Make an

Imaginative

Narrative Plan

based on a

prompt

20

slide22

My Crazy Hat Adventure

It was about mid-July when I dashed into a new hat store called Caitlin’s World of

Crazy Hats. I was as hot as a firecracker, and my head was about to get sunburned. I

found the hat of my dreams. It was a cool looking beach hat with a wide brim that

would give me some shade from the sun. I reached out, grabbed the hat, and placed

it on my head to see if it fit.

Suddenly I was in the Bahamas surfing. I moved my legs in all sorts of directions to

keep my balance and do some tricks on the surfboard. People on the beach clapped

and yelled. They loved me. I thought in my head for a second, “Why don’t I just show

them my stuff!” So I went out in the waves and did some jumps and spins. I thought

I would just show off one more time with my special trick. I held onto my hat and

sprang into the air and did a full flip. Landing it would be the hard part. Luckily I felt

me feet make perfect contact with the surfboard and my hands flew up so I could

keep my balance. The crowd cheered. “I did it!” I said to myself.

Ding, dong. Ding, dong, went the town clock. I looked up. Everyone on the beach

was running away. It seemed like even the waves slowed down. “What’s going on?” I

wondered. One man stayed behind. He yelled to me, “Get out of the water! It’s shark

feeding time.” I started paddling to shore.

Out of nowhere a great white shark popped his head out of the water. “Ahhhh!” I

screamed. I paddled and paddled. My eyes could see the shoreline. Out of the corner

of my eye I could see the shark closing in behind me. “Chomp!” The shark bit my

board. I was flung up into the sky above the blue ocean water. I started to fall. ‘Swish.”

I fell flat into the water on my stomach. My new beach hat tumbled off and floated

away in the waves near the shark.

Poof! I was back in Caitlin’s World of Crazy Hats. To my surprise I was soaking wet. I

looked at my stomach and it had gigantic a red spot on it. The other customers stared

at me. My face turned red with embarrassment. Right then I thought to myself, ‘I’m

never going to try on another hat again. It just might lead to trouble.”

Example of

Intriguing Adventure

Page 337

22

slide23

The Stages of Teaching

the Imaginative Narrative

in Third Grade

Review the

Organizational

Structure of the

Problem/Solution

Imaginative

Narrative

Explore

Intriguing

Adventure

Literature

to determine the

text structures

Make an

Imaginative

Narrative Plan

based on a

prompt

Teacher

models

creating the

Imaginative

Narrative

23

slide24

Read about Modeling the

Imaginative Narrative

in Third Grade

(pp. 338 – 343)

24

slide25

The Stages of Teaching

the Imaginative Narrative

in Third Grade

Review the

Organizational

Structure of the

Problem/Solution

Imaginative

Narrative

Explore

Intriguing

Adventure

Literature

to determine the

text structures

Make an

Imaginative

Narrative Plan

based on a

prompt

Teacher

models

creating the

Imaginative

Narrative

Students Create

Imaginative

Narratives and

teacher assesses

using rubric

25

slide26

Review the Third Grade

Imaginative Narrative

Rubric

(pp. 344 – 347)

26

the imaginative narrative in fourth and fifth grade
The Imaginative Narrative in Fourth and Fifth Grade

Instruction begins with reviewing the Problem/Solution and Intriguing Adventure structures introduced in 2nd and 3rd Grades

Beginning Grade Level instruction focuses on identifying the essentials of Imaginative Narrative in literature

Involves developing a more sophisticated Imaginative Narrative with the deliberate insertion of the essential elements of humor, suspense/tension, and/or drama

Includes a sequence of events that increases in intensity, supporting details that incorporate the essential elements, descriptive language, transition words, openings and closings

27

slide28

The Stages of Teaching

the Imaginative Narrative

in Fourth and Fifth Grade

Review the

Organizational

Structures of the

Problem/Solution

and Intriguing

Adventure

28

slide29

The Stages of Teaching

the Imaginative Narrative

in Fourth and Fifth Grade

Review the

Organizational

Structures of the

Problem/Solution

and Intriguing

Adventure

Introduce the

Essentials of

Imaginative

Narrative with

explanations

and examples

29

slide31

The Stages of Teaching

the Imaginative Narrative

in Fourth and Fifth Grade

Review the

Organizational

Structures of the

Problem/Solution

and Intriguing

Adventure

Introduce the

Essentials of

Imaginative

Narrative with

explanations

and examples

Analyze the

Organizational

Structure of a

piece of literature

and identify the

Essential Elements

31

slide34

The Stages of Teaching

the Imaginative Narrative

in Fourth and Fifth Grade

Review the

Organizational

Structures of the

Problem/Solution

and Intriguing

Adventure

Working in

pairs to plan Imaginative Narratives and to incorporate the Essential Elements

Introduce the

Essentials of

Imaginative

Narrative with

explanations

and examples

Analyze the

Organizational

Structure of a

piece of literature

and identify the

Essential Elements

34

slide36

D-Day

by Ryan

“Thump thump” went my heart as the mad scientist jumped out of my story book

and onto my bed. “Hello” I nervously exclaimed as the hot summer sun shined

through the window and beat down on my face. Ignoring me the tall darkhaired

scientist reached into his pocket and pulled out a small device that read at the top

time machine. Before I could react he pushed a red button on the front. Suddenly

there was a blinding flash of light. Not long after, I found myself surrounded by

soldiers of the american army. Instantly I knew that I had been sent back in time to

June 6, 1944 (D-Day) omaha Beach. Water splashed against my face as the landing

craft moved closer to the beach that would soon be known as bloody omaha. I was

shaking with fear, as one of the sergeants yelled out orders at that instant the

landing crafts ramp dropped. The sounds of grenades and shells exploding and

bullets flying filled the air. Later during the battle, when the beach was clear except

for a few snipers, me and the invading troops moved inland. In the meantime,

sherman tanks and heavy artillery rolled onto the beach. Once the allies had

ended this tragic battle, I stared at the horrible sight of wounded and dead men. Right

as the american flag was raised there was another flash of bright light. Shortly after I

was back in my room right then, I noticed that the mad scientist was gone, “thank

goodness” I said to myself. As I slowly left the room I wondered where he was and what he was doing.

Student Sample

Page 352

36

slide37

Student Sample

Blackbeard

and the

Strange Object

Page 353

37

slide38

The Stages of Teaching

the Imaginative Narrative

in Fourth and Fifth Grade

Review the

Organizational

Structures of the

Problem/Solution

and Intriguing

Adventure

Working in

pairs to plan Imaginative Narratives and to incorporate the Essential Elements

Introduce the

Essentials of

Imaginative

Narrative with

explanations

and examples

Analyze the

Organizational

Structure of a

piece of literature

and identify the

Essential Elements

Students Create

Imaginative

Narratives and

teacher assesses

using rubric

38

slide39

Review the Fourth through Eighth Grade

Imaginative Narrative

Rubric

(pp. 355 – 358)

39

slide40

The Stages of Teaching

the Imaginative Narrative

in Fourth and Fifth Grade

Review the

Organizational

Structures of the

Problem/Solution

and Intriguing

Adventure

Working in

pairs to plan Imaginative Narratives and to incorporate the Essential Elements

Introduce the

Essentials of

Imaginative

Narrative with

explanations

and examples

Analyze the

Organizational

Structure of a

piece of literature

and identify the

Essential Elements

Students Create

Imaginative

Narratives and

teacher assesses

using rubric

Teacher provides

opportunities for

practice and

various Support

Activities

40

slide41

Take a few minutes to read the following. . .

Suggested

Imaginative Narrative Prompts

Page 359

Imaginative Narrative

Support Activities

Pages 360 - 362

41

slide42

Read pages 363 and 364 and complete the

Double Bubble Map below.

Be prepared to share your responses.

Imaginative

Narratives

Fictional

Narratives

42

slide43

Types of Narrative Writing

First

Next

Then

Personal

Experience

Imaginative

After that

Last

“Intriguing

Adventure”

Structure

Problem/

Solution

Structure

Organized

Chronologically

Organized

Categorically

Pirates of the

Caribbean

Heat Wave

by Helen

Ketterman

Sunshine

Home by

Eve Bunting

When I Was

Young in the

Mountains by

Cynthia Rylant

Meanwhile

Back at the Ranch

by Trinka

Hakes Noble

A Bad Case

of Stripes

by David

Shannon

The Principal

from the

Black Lagoon

by Mike Thaler

The Cow Who

Wouldn’t

Come Down by

Paul Brett Johnson

Page 307

43

slide44

4th /5th Grade Components of

Write from the Beginning…and Beyond?

Self

Assessment

of

Implementation

Focused

Modeled

Writing

Mini

Lessons

Analytic

Improvement

Rubrics

Unassisted

Writing

Includes time

for practice

without Direct

teacher

Model

Includes all

types of writing

Identified in state and Core

Standards

Includes

Writer’s

Workshop

Focused

on

Essential

Criteria

Two types

Reflective

of student

needs

Occur daily

Teacher

Modeled

Focused

on a

particular

Mode

4th : 3 days

a week

5th : 3 days

a week

Used to

guide

instruction

Used with

non-modeled

writing

4th/5th

Grade Goal:

16 - 20 pts

on Grade

Level Rubric

44

slide46

Take a few minutes to discuss a plan for teaching

Narrative Writing at your grade level:

What types or Narrative will you teach this year

(personal chronological, personal thematic,

imaginative as problem/solution,

imaginative as intriguing adventure,

fictional)?

When will you teach each type?

46