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Secondary Transition for Children with Disabilities. Purpose of the Training. The following presentation and materials support districts in achieving compliance in secondary transition as part of the Office for Exceptional Children (OEC) Comprehensive Monitoring System.

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Presentation Transcript
purpose of the training
Purpose of the Training

The following presentation and materials support districts in achieving compliance in secondary transition as part of the Office for Exceptional Children (OEC) Comprehensive Monitoring System.

August 30, 2012

legal requirements for secondary transition
Legal Requirementsfor Secondary Transition
  • Ohio Revised Code:
  • Section 3301-51-01(B)(63) Transition Services
  • Section 3301-51-07(H)(2) Transition Services
  • Section 3301-51-07(L) (3)
  • Failure to meet transition objectives
  • Section 3301-51-06(F)(5)(c) Summary of performance

August 30, 2012

slide4
IDEA

Planning for Post Secondary Success Is Embedded in IDEA

The purpose of IDEA is to ensure that all children with disabilities have available to them a free appropriate public education (FAPE) that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepare them for further education, employment, and independent living. (34CFR §300.1(a))

August 30, 2012

slide5
IDEA
  • Focus is on what a child will do after he or she graduates from high school
  • Develop postsecondary goals and activities that are results oriented

Best Practice

  • Annual goals & activities in the IEP reflect what the child is expected to know or is able to do to meet postsecondary goals

August 30, 2012

slide6
IDEA

Transition Services:

  • Based upon child’s needs taking into account the child’s preferences, interests, needs & strengths
  • Facilitate movement from high school to further education, employment,& independent living
  • Coordinated with all persons and/or agencies working together to plan and deliver the services
  • Should be considered from a multi-year perspective

August 30, 2012

sb 316
SB 316

Requires IEPs beginning at age 14 to include:

  • Measurable postsecondary goals based on age-appropriate transition assessments related to:
    • Training,
    • Education
    • Independent living skills; and
    • Employment in a competitive environment in which workers are integrated regardless of disability

August 30, 2012

ohio s standards
Ohio’s Standards

The IEP must include:

  • A Future Planning Statement
  • A Statement of Transition Service Needs
  • Age-Appropriate Transition Assessment
  • Measurable Postsecondary Goals
  • Course of Study
  • Transition Services/Activities
  • Measurable Annual Goals

August 30, 2012

state performance plan spp
State Performance Plan (SPP)
  • A federal requirement – 20 Indicators
  • Evaluates Ohio’s efforts to implement the requirements of IDEA
  • Indicators directly related to transition
      • Indicator 1:Increased Graduation Rates for Children with Disabilities
      • Indicator 2: Reduction of Dropouts
      • Indicator 13: Increased Quality and Effectiveness of the Transition Components
      • Indicator 14: Increased Postsecondary Success for Children with Disabilities

August 30, 2012

transition responsibility of schools
Transition Responsibility of Schools

Based on federal and Ohio laws, what responsibilities do school districts have regarding transition?

August 30, 2012

transition responsibility of schools1
Transition Responsibility of Schools

Schools ARE responsible for:

  • providing the educational programs & transitionservices stated in the IEP

Schools ARENOT responsible:

  • if the postsecondary goal is not attained by the child

August 30, 2012

transition responsibility of schools continued
Transition Responsibility of Schools (continued)

Example:

If a measurable postsecondary goal in employment is a job as a nurse, a school is responsible for the implementation of the child’s course of study, specific transition services, behavioral interventions, and progress on annual IEP goals that support the child’s future planning to become a nurse.

However, a school is not held responsible ifthe child does not get a job as a nurse upon graduation.

August 30, 2012

how do you know you have met your responsibility for secondary transition
How do you know you have met your responsibility for secondary transition?

Use Indicator 13 Transition Checklist

Indicator 13 Checklist

August 30, 2012

what is the indicator 13 transition checklist
What is the Indicator 13 Transition Checklist?

Created by the National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center (NSTTAC)

Approved by the U.S. Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP)

Purpose - Help states collect data to meet Indicator 13 – Transition

Used by IEP teams to determine if all transition requirements are included in the goals

Indicator 13 Checklist

August 30, 2012

transition planning flow
Transition Planning Flow

Summary of Performance

Annual IEP Goal(s)

Course(s) of Study

Transition Services/Activities

Measureable Postsecondary Goal(s)

Age-Appropriate Assessments

Transition Services Needs Statement

Future Planning

August 30, 2012

who should participate in developing the transition section of the iep
Who should participate in developing the transition section of the IEP?
  • The child
  • Family members
  • Educators

Depending on the child’s future plans and needs:

  • Related service providers
  • Agency personnel
  • Community service providers
  • Postsecondary staff

(Indicator 13 Checklist, #7 & #8)

Indicator 13 Checklist

August 30, 2012

future planning for transition
Future Planning for Transition
  • Start early
  • Multi-year process
  • Changes from school focused to life beyond school

Best Practice

  • Ongoing discussion between family, child and school
  • Occurs outside the IEP meeting

August 30, 2012

future planning iep section 11
Future PlanningIEP Section 1
  • Based on discussions with the child and child’s family
  • Includes plans for the child’s future including school and life beyond school
    • Education/training
    • Employment
    • Independent living if appropriate
  • Summarizes the child’s skills, preferences, interests, needs & strengths
  • Foundation for transition planning

August 30, 2012

statement of transition service needs
Statement of Transition Service Needs
  • Beginning at age 14, (or younger, if appropriate)
  • A statement of the transition services needs of the child that focuses on the child’s course of study
  • Describes the child’s needs related to transition to and through the first years of high school

August 30, 2012

age appropriate transition assessments
Age-Appropriate Transition Assessments
  • Ongoing process
  • Inform the development of measurable postsecondary goals
  • Basis for decisions regarding transition services
  • Basis for identifying annual IEP goals to support movement to postsecondary goals

(Indicator 13 Checklist, # 3)

Indicator 13 Checklist

August 30, 2012

age appropriate transition assessments continued
Age-Appropriate Transition Assessments(continued)
  • Essential to the transition planning process
  • Both informal and formal

Best Practice

  • Should be conducted before the IEP meeting

August 30, 2012

age appropriate transition assessments both informal and formal continued
Age-Appropriate Transition Assessments Both Informal and Formal (continued)

Informal

  • Observations

-Family, colleagues, employers

  • Meetings with child
  • Surveys and questionnaires
  • Interviews
  • Task analysis
  • Self-determination assessments

August 30, 2012

age appropriate transition assessments continued1
Age-Appropriate Transition Assessments (continued)

Formal

  • Career assessment
  • Learning style inventories
  • Academic achievement tests
  • Adaptive behavior scales
  • Personality assessment
  • Interest inventories
  • Testing from ETR
  • Progress in classes

(Indicator 13 Checklist, #3)

Indicator 13 Checklist

August 30, 2012

age appropriate transition assessments continued2
Age-Appropriate Transition Assessments(continued)

Assessments are documented in

  • Section 4 of the IEP
    • Type of assessment conducted
    • Person or agency conducting the assessment
    • Date
    • Summary of results
  • ETR
  • Profile
  • Present Levels of Performance

August 30, 2012

measurable postsecondary goals iep section 5
Measurable Postsecondary GoalsIEP Section 5

Education or training

  • Will it be full or part-time?
  • What field of study or type of training? (e.g., full-time four-year college, on- the- job training in a clerical setting)

Employment

  • Full or part-time?
  • What type of work is desired? (e.g., full-time work as an auto mechanic)

Independent living, if appropriate

  • What type or residence and/or activities in the community? (e.g., living in an apartment with agency supports, enrollment in the YMCA)

(Indicator 13 Checklist, #1)

Indicator 13 Checklist

August 30, 2012

measurable postsecondary goals continued
Measurable Postsecondary Goals(continued)
  • Results oriented
  • Occur after the child graduates or leaves high school
  • Written in the affirmative
  • Reviewed or updated at least annually

(Indicator 13 Checklist, #2)

Indicator 13 Checklist

August 30, 2012

writing a measurable postsecondary goal continued
Writing A Measurable Postsecondary Goal (continued)

A measurable postsecondary goal is not measurable in the same way as a measurable annual goal.

August 30, 2012

writing a measurable postsecondary goal continued1
Writing A Measurable Postsecondary Goal (continued)

NSTTAC formula for writing a postsecondary goal:

________ _____ will _____ ___________

(After high school) (child) (behavior) (where and how)

(After graduation)

(Upon completion of high school)

(Indicator 13 Checklist, #1)

Indicator 13 Checklist

August 30, 2012

course of study iep section 5 continued
Course of StudyIEP Section 5 (continued)
  • Multi-year description of competencies
    • Examples: College Prep, Career-Tech
  • Designed to reasonably enable the child to meet postsecondary goals
  • Specific courses may be listed
  • May be modified and updated as needed
  • Addresses the Ohio CORE requirements
  • Addresses the child’s pathway to graduation

(Indicator 13 Checklist, #5)

Indicator 13 Checklist

August 30, 2012

transition services activities iep section 5 continued
Transition Services/ActivitiesIEP Section 5 (continued)

Transition services:

  • Take into account the child’s preferences, interests, needs, and strengths (PINS)
  • Are based on age-appropriate transition assessments; and

August 30, 2012

transition services activities continued
Transition Services/Activities(continued)

Prepare the child for:

  • Postsecondary education or training;
  • Postsecondary employment; and
  • If appropriate, independent living.

(Indicator 13 Checklist, #1)

Indicator 13 Checklist

August 30, 2012

transition services activities continued1
Transition Services/Activities(continued)
  • Timelines need to be specific in the current IEP and broader for future years.
  • Timelines must include beginning date & the anticipated duration of the activity or service.
  • Timelines for initiation, frequency, & duration must be specified.

Some activities may be one-time activities.

August 30, 2012

transition services activities continued2
Transition Services/Activities(continued)
  • Identify services/activities based on target graduation date.
  • Include at least one transition service/ activity to support each postsecondary goal
  • Identify title of the person or agency responsible for each service.
    • The child or the parent should not be listed as the person responsible.

August 30, 2012

types of transition services activities
Types of Transition Services/Activities

Include:

  • Instruction;
  • Related services;
  • Community experiences; and
  • Development of employment & other adult living objectives.
  • Acquisition of daily living skills if appropriate
  • Functional vocational evaluation if appropriate
  • Linkages with adult services if appropriate

August 30, 2012

instruction
Instruction

Refers to instruction not included in the child’s course of study.

Examples:

  • self-determination & disability awareness;
  • study skills training; or
  • specific types of instruction such as occupational skill training or on the job training.

August 30, 2012

related services
Related Services

Identify services that will enhance the child’s ability to perform in current & future environments related to postsecondary goals & activities

Examples:

  • Work-site and/or college accommodations;
  • work study services;
  • OT; PT; SLP; organizers & checklists;
  • flexible schedules;
  • crisis intervention;
  • behavior supports

August 30, 2012

community experiences
Community Experiences

Identify ways in which the child’s classroom learning can be applied in authentic settings

Examples:

  • Community work experiences;
  • college classes;
  • volunteer experiences

August 30, 2012

development of employment other postsecondary living goals
Development of Employment & Other Postsecondary Living Goals

Identify ways that the child can develop and make career plans

Examples:

  • career planning activities [e.g., Ohio Career Information System(OCIS)];
  • other career planning and age-appropriate transition assessments;
  • guidance counseling;
  • job shadowing;
  • career preparation activities

August 30, 2012

acquisition of daily living skills if appropriate
Acquisition of Daily Living Skills if Appropriate

Identify activities of daily living that support a child’s performance relative to postsecondary goals.

Examples:

  • hygiene and grooming - health care;
  • clothing care;
  • nutrition and menu planning - cooking;
  • financial literacy;
  • shopping;
  • transportation

August 30, 2012

functional vocational evaluation if appropriate
Functional Vocational Evaluation if Appropriate

An assessment process for any child that provides information about career interests, aptitudes, and skills (assessments must bevalid for child with disabilities)

Examples:

  • Situational work assessments;
  • work samples;
  • interest inventories;
  • aptitude tests; and
  • internships

August 30, 2012

linkages with adult services if appropriate
Linkages with Adult Services if Appropriate

Consider the child’s post-school needs (on-going or time-limited supports) and eligibility for adult services

Examples:

  • Rehabilitation Services (Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR);
  • summer youth employment programs;
  • developmental disability (DD) services;
  • social security benefits;
  • university/college disability services; and
  • independent living centers.

August 30, 2012

measurable annual goals iep section 61
Measurable Annual GoalsIEP Section 6

Annual goals support movement toward the postsecondary goals

  • There must be at least one annual goal for each postsecondary goal.
  • One annual goal may be related to more than one postsecondary goal.

(Indicator 13 Checklist, #6)

Indicator 13 Checklist

August 30, 2012

summary of performance
Summary of Performance
  • Required by IDEA
  • Provided to the child when graduating from high school and to a child who exceeds age eligibility
  • Child input is important and necessary
  • Addresses:
    • Summary of child’s academic achievement and functional performance
    • Recommendations to assist child in meeting postsecondary goals

August 30, 2012

do the transition goals meet the requirements of the law
Do the Transition Goals Meet the Requirements of the Law?

One way to determine that the transition goals on the IEP meet the requirements of the law is to use the Indicator 13 Checklist.

Indicator 13 Checklist

August 30, 2012

nsttac examples
NSTTAC Examples

Examples of appropriate, postsecondary goals can be found at the National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center (NSTTAC) Indicator 13 training site: www.nsttac.org/content/nsttac-indicator-13-checklist-form-b-enhanced-professional-development

Indicator 13 Checklist

August 30, 2012

nsttac examples1
NSTTAC Examples

Select the links for descriptions of the following:

  • child with specific learning disabilities: Jason, John
  • child with autism: Alex
  • child with intellectual disabilities: Jeremy, Jodi, Stephanie
  • child with severe, complex disabilities: David, Kevin

August 30, 2012

planning tool

Planning Tool

Backward Planning for Postsecondary Success

August 30, 2012

backward planning
Backward Planning
  • One process that may be used
  • Starts with the child’s postsecondary goals
  • Identifies what the child needs to do
    • A year before graduation
    • Two years before graduation
    • Three years before graduation
    • Back to where child is currently

August 30, 2012

backward planning1
Backward Planning

Backward Planning Form: http://www.edresourcesohio.org/transition/checklist/Backward_Planning_Form.pdf

August 30, 2012