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I n t r o d u c t i o n t o L e a d e r s h i p S k ills f o r T r o o p s

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  1. I n t r o d u c t i o n t o L e a d e r s h i p S k ills f o r T r o o p s

  2. Course Agenda • Introduction • Module1 Unit Organization • Module 2 Breakout Game • Module 3 Tools of the Trade • Lunch • Module 4 Leadership and Teamwork • Module 5 Breakout Game

  3. Module 1 Unit Organization Agenda Unit Organization Overview: • Introduction to the Course —5 minutes • Introduction to Vision —5 to 10 minutes • Troop Organization —20 to 35 minutes • Scout led Troop —25 to 30 minutes • Introduction to Servant Leadership —5 to 10 minutes

  4. Introduction Mission Statement The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.

  5. Introduction Life Skills in a Values-Based Environment Scouting is a values-based program with its own code of conduct. The Scout Oath and Law help instill the values of good conduct and honesty. A boy who spends one year in a Scout troop will learn lifetime skills. He will learn basic outdoor skills, self-reliance, and how to get along with others. Scouting will prepare him to live a more productive and fulfilling life.

  6. Introduction The First Steps in the Youth Leadership Continuum…. The purpose of the Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops(ILST) course is to teach Scouts with leadership positions about their new roles and how to most effectively reach success in that role. It is intended to help Boy Scouts in leadership positions within their troop understand their responsibilities and to equip them with organizational and leadership skills to fulfill those responsibilities. ILST is the first course in the series of leadership training offered to Boy Scouts and is a replacement for Troop Leadership Training. Completion of ILST is a prerequisite for Boy Scouts to participate in the more advanced leadership courses National Youth Leadership Training (NYLT) and the National Advanced Youth Leadership Experience (NAYLE). It is also required to participate in a Kodiak Challenge Trek.

  7. Introduction Leadership in Boy Scouting: Leadership is a vital part of the Scouting program. Boy Scouts in positions of leadership run the troop. They take care of the many tasks necessary for troop and patrol meetings and activities to run smoothly. By accepting the responsibilities of troop leadership, Scouts are Preparing themselves to be leaders throughout their lives. Opportunities to develop leadership skills are every bit as important, if not more important, to Boy Scouts and to Scouting in general as any recognition or advancement program. Scouting offers young people a rich and varied arena in which to learn and use leadership skills. It is also a way to keep Boy Scouts interested and involved—keep them busy, organized, and trained, and give them opportunities to lead. Among the activities encountered by a troop’s leaders are: • Organizing the troop • Planning and organizing activities and meetings • Assigning duties to others • Planning menus and figuring out food costs • Encouraging advancement • Guiding a troop’s involvement in problem-solving • Teaching outdoor, sports, or craft skills • Handling the troop’s finances • Encouraging participation • Ensuring the troop’s safety during meetings and outings • Helping other Boy Scouts make the most of their own leadership opportunities As part of the Youth Training Continuum, ILST provides the core unit-level leadership skills every Scout leader should know. This is followed by the National Youth Leadership Training(NYLT) course, which expands on the skills learned in ILST and provides Scouts with more advanced leadership skills and experience during a six-day course delivered in an outdoor setting. The National Advanced Youth Leadership Experience(NAYLE) is an exciting program that allows NYLT graduates to enhance their leadership skills in the Philmont backcountry. NAYLE offers Scouts an unforgettable wilderness experience as they use leadership and team-building skills to resolve exciting and challenging backcountry situations. Last, the Kodiak Challenge offers Scouts an opportunity to reinforce their leadership skills on an exciting trek adventure. Scouts may participate in a Kodiak Challenge Trek after they have completed any of these three trainings, but the ILST is required.

  8. Introduction The purpose of Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops(ILST) is to provide the foundational Unit level leadership skills every Scout leader should know. The objective of ILST is to give each Scout a clearer picture of how his position fits in the troop and how he can make a difference. It is also designed to give him additional tools and ideas for fulfilling his role as a leader in the troop. We will discuss how the troop is organized and what other Scout leaders and adults each Scout can rely upon in his leadership role. Then we’ll review some key leadership skills and ideas to help every Scout leader fulfill his role in the troop. It is both an honor and a responsibility to be a scout leader in Troop 5. Being a leader is not about being the person in front, or wearing the patch, or being the boss. Good leaders are not “all about themselves”. They understand the reason to lead is because they can make a difference in the troop and help make those they lead successful in their roles and in all they do. The badges of office presented to each of the Scouts when accepting their position of troop leadership did not automatically make them good leaders. The skills and information they learn during ILST can help them get started in their leadership experience. The Scout leaders who have already had leadership positions in the troop can pick up new ideas during ILST and continue to develop their skills while serving in their new positions. ILST will help each Scout leader gain the knowledge and skills needed to fulfill his leadership assignment.

  9. Introduction Introduction to Vision Vision is critical to success in any role or project. You must first know what success looks like before you can reach that success. In Scouting, a troop’s vision is something developed and shared by all members. It Identifies where the troop is going—what it wants to accomplish. As an individual, you probably have a number of visions, but you may not have articulated them. We will discuss vision more thoroughly in Module Three, but each Scout should be thinking about his own vision of success in his new position, as well as his vision for the troop.

  10. Introduction Scoutmaster Vision of Success All members of Troop 5 will live the Scout Oath and Law. Troop 5 will be Boy Led. The youth members of Troop 5 will be responsible for: • Program planning including: • Annual Patrol Leaders Council to determine camping locations for the Scouting year • Monthly Patrol Leaders Council meetings to plan weekly Troop meeting and details of monthly camp out. Program execution including: • Conducting organized troop meetings • Conducting safe and fun outdoor activities that serve as learning opportunities Troop Support including: • Actively participating in Troop meetings, service projects, training and camp outs • Operating in patrols, all members working for the success of the patrol • Wearing the uniform properly and enthusiastically • Training inexperienced Scouts in the skills needed to advance in rank • Prompt payment of dues • Recruiting new members The adult members of Troop 5 will be responsible for: • The safety of all members of Troop 5 • Allowing the boys to lead • Assisting youth with program planning • Securing reservations for and providing transportation to Troop or Patrol events • Advising and coaching youth leadership • Training youth leaders so that they will be successful in their positions of responsibility • Providing qualified leadership and discipline in all activities

  11. Troop 5 Organization *Orange rectangle above indicates minimum attendees required for a PLC. All registered scouts are encouraged to attend all PLC’s.

  12. Troop 5 Organization Troop Organization Dynamics: Notice that across the organizational chart, Scout positions are associated with adult positions: The senior patrol leader(SPL) works closely with the Scoutmaster; other troop leaders works closely with other adults. No position is completely independent. Cooperation and teamwork between adults and Scouts is essential. Also notice that Scouts with leadership positions have responsibilities to one another. The SPL manages other Scout leaders and is responsible for their performance. Elected Scout leaders can have appointed Scout leaders to manage, and be responsible for, as well. Troop 5 has a number of important Scout positions. The highest positions are elected and serve for a period of time in those positions (a “term of office”). A number of appointed leadership positions are available, with varying levels of skill and commitment required to fulfill. Hopefully, every troop member will be encouraged to accept some kind of leadership position every year in the troop.

  13. Troop 5 Organization Individual Scout Roles and Responsibilities: Scout troops are run by Scout leaders who are elected or appointed from and by the troop’s Scout membership. These Scout leaders are responsible for seeing that the troop runs well, grows, and meets the needs of the members. The number of Scout leaders can change over time, depending on the size and needs of the troop. The following pages contain a summary of the responsibilities of each position in troop 5. Once a position of responsibility has been accepted a formal contract will be reviewed and signed by appropriate parties.

  14. Individual Scout Roles and Responsibilities • SENIOR PATROL LEADER • Position description: The senior patrol leader is elected by the Scouts to represent them as the top youth leader in the troop. He obtains his position by satisfactorily serving as scribe and assistant SPL for 6months each. • Reports to: The Scoutmaster • Term of Office: 6months • Qualifications:First Class scout or higher for 6months and satisfactorily held Scribe and ASPL for term. • Senior patrol leader duties: • Preside at all troop meetings, events, activities, and the annual program planning conference. • Chairs the patrol leaders' council meeting. • Appoints other troop youth leaders with the advice and counsel of the Scoutmaster. • Assigns duties and responsibilities to youth leaders and assures execution. • Assists the Scoutmaster with youth leadership training. • Assure timely and clear communication of all troop activities to scouts and scoutmasters. • Sets a good example. • Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout spirit. • Attend 85% of troop scouting activities.

  15. Individual Scout Roles and Responsibilities • ASSISTANT SENIOR PATROL LEADER • Position description: The assistant senior patrol leader is the second highest-ranking youth leader in the troop. The assistant senior patrol leader acts as the senior patrol leader in the absence of the senior patrol leader or when called upon. He also provides leadership to other youth leaders in the troop. • Reports to:The senior patrol leader • Term of Office: 6 months • Qualifications:First class scout or higher for 6months and satisfactorily serving as scribe for term. • Assistant senior patrol leader duties: • Helps the senior patrol leader lead meetings and activities. • Runs the troop in the absence of the senior patrol leader. • Helps train and supervise the troop scribe, quartermaster, instructor, librarian, historian, and chaplain's aide. • Serves as a member of the patrol leaders' council. • Sets a good example and shows Scout spirit. • Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. • Lives the Scout Oath and Law AND Wears the uniform correctly. • Lends a hand controlling the troop and building troop spirit. • Assists the Scoutmaster with youth leadership training. • Assures necessary resource and equipment needs are communicated to SPL and ASM. • Attends 80% of Troop activities.

  16. Individual Scout Roles and Responsibilities • TROOP SCRIBE • Position description: The scribe keeps the troop records. He records the activities of the patrol leaders’ council and keeps a record of dues, advancement, and Scout attendance at troop activities. He obtains his position by being elected by scouts or by being appointed. • Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader • Term of Office: 6 months • Qualification:First class scout or higher for 6months , active in troop for previous 6 month period and satisfactorily serving in previous position of responsibility. • Scribe duties: • Attends and keeps a log of patrol leaders’ council meetings. • Records individual Scout attendance and dues payments. • Records individual Scout advancement progress. • Assure monthly trip sheets are uploaded at least two weeks prior to planned event. • Records attendance for Troop Monthly campouts including seats required for transit. • At a minimum sends out a Monthly newsletter including review prior to sending by ASPL or SPL. • Updates website or provides timely input to webmaster for updating. • Works with the troop committee member responsible for records and finance. • Sets a good example and Shows Scout spirit. • Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Attends 80% of Troop Activities.

  17. Individual Scout Roles and Responsibilities • PATROL LEADER • Position description: The patrol leader is the elected leader of his patrol. He represents his patrol on the patrol leaders’ council. • Reports to: The senior patrol leader • Term of Office:6 months • Qualification: First class scout or higherwith active participation in previous 6 months. • Patrol leader duties: • Appoints the assistant patrol leader when appropriate. • Represents the patrol on the patrol leaders’ council. • Plans and steers patrol meetings. • Helps Scouts advance. • Acts as the chief recruiter of new Scouts. • Keeps patrol members informed of patrol and troop activities. • Follows up with scouts not attending activities and reporting results. • Knows what his patrol members and other leaders can do. • Sets the example and Shows Scout spirit. • Wears the uniform correctly. • Lives the Scout Oath and Law. • Consecutive terms not allowed. • Attends 80% of Troop and 85% of Patrol Activities.

  18. Individual Scout Roles and Responsibilities • ASSISTANT PATROL LEADER • Position description: The assistant patrol leader is appointed by the patrol leader and leads the patrol in his absence. May be appointed or elected by his patrol. • Reports to:The patrol leader • Term: 6 months • Qualifications:First class scout or higherwith active participation in previous 6 months. • Assistant patrol leader duties: • Helps the patrol leader plan and steer patrol meetings and activities. • Helps him keep patrol members informed. • Helps the patrol get ready for all troop activities. • Represents his patrol at patrol leaders’ council meetings when the patrol leader cannot attend. • Attends 80% of Troop an 80% of Patrol activities

  19. TROOP GUIDE • Position description:The troop guide works with new Scouts. He helps them feel comfortable and earn their First Class rank in their first year. He obtains his position by being appointed. • Reports to:The assistant Scoutmaster for the new-Scout patrol in the troop • Qualifications: First class scout or higherwith active participation in previous 6 months. • Troop guide duties: • Introduces new Scouts to troop operations. • Guides new Scouts from harassment by older Scouts. • Helps and encourages new Scouts to earn First Class rank in their first year . • Teaches basic Scout skills and identifies training needs to New Scout ASM and SPL. • Works with the scout leaders at patrol leaders’ council meetings. • Attends patrol leaders’ council meetings with the patrol leader of the new-Scout Patrol. • Assists the assistant Scoutmaster with training. • Counsels individuals Scouts on Scouting challenges. • Sets a good example and Shows Scout spirit. • Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Attends 80% of Troop activities. Individual Scout Roles and Responsibilities

  20. Individual Scout Roles and Responsibilities • TROOP QUARTERMASTER • Position description:The quartermaster keeps track of troop equipment and seesthat it is ingood working order. He is appointed by the ASPL. • Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader • Qualifications:First class scout or higherwith active participation in previous 6 months. • Quartermaster duties: • Keeps records on patrol and troop equipment using appropriate logs. • Makes sure equipment is in good working condition. • Issues equipment and makes sure it is returned in good condition. • Makes suggestions for new or replacement items. • Works with the troop committee member responsible for equipment. • Sets a good example. • Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout spirit. • Attends 80% of troop activities. • Participates in Den chief training.

  21. Individual Scout Roles and Responsibilities • TROOP HISTORIAN • Position description: The troop historian preserves troop photographs, news stories, trophies, flags, scrapbooks, awards, and other memorabilia. Appointed by ASPL. • Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader • Qualification:First class scout or higher with active participation in previous 6 months. • Historian duties: • Gathers pictures and facts about troop activities and keeps them in a historical file or scrapbook or website. • Takes care of troop trophies, ribbons, and souvenirs of troop activities. • Keeps information about former members of the troop. • Sets a good example. • Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Maintains troop eagle scout registry and their projects. • Updates website or provides input to web master for updating. • Shows Scout spirit. • Attends 80% of Troop activities.

  22. Individual Scout Roles and Responsibilities • TROOP LIBRARIAN • Position description: The librarian oversees the care and use of troop books, pamphlets, magazines, audiovisuals, and merit badge counselor lists. Appointed by ASPL. • Reports to: The assistant senior patrol leader • Qualification:First class scout or higherwith active participation in previous 6 months. • Librarian duties: • Sets up and takes care of a troop library. • Keeps records of books and pamphlets owned by the troop. • Adds new or replacement items as needed including scout master conference forms. • Keeps books and pamphlets available for borrowing. • Keeps a system for checking books and pamphlets in and out, and follows up on late returns. • Sets a good example. • Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. • Updates website or provided input to webmaster in regards to online publications. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout spirit. • Attend 80% of troop activities.

  23. Individual Scout Roles and Responsibilities • INSTRUCTOR • Position description:The instructor teaches Scouting skills. Appointed by ASPL. • Reports to:The assistant senior patrol leader • Qualifications:First class scout or higherwith active participation in previous 6 months. • Instructor duties: • Teaches basic Scouting skills in troop and patrols. • Sets a good example. • Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout spirit. • Attends 80% of Troops activities.

  24. Individual Scout Roles and Responsibilities Webmaster Position description: The webmaster serves to assure Troop 5 website reflects the troops plans with input from scout leaders. Reports to: Scribe Qualification: First class scout or higherwith active participation in previous 6 months. Webmaster duties: • Establish and maintain a safe and secure troop website. • Ensure the troop website is a positive reflection of Scouting for the public. • Manage the troop’s electronic communication tools. • Work with the Scouts to provide up-to-date troop information. • Work with the scribe to assure trip sheets published 2 weeks before trip. • Set a good example. • Wear the Scout uniform correctly. • Live by the Scout Oath and Scout Law. • Show and help develop Scout spirit. • Attends 80% of troop activities.

  25. Individual Scout Roles and Responsibilities • CHAPLAIN’S AIDE • Position description:The chaplain’s aide works with the troop chaplain to meet the religious needs of Scouts in the troop. He also works to promote the religious emblems program. Appointed by ASPL. • Reports to:The assistant senior patrol leader • Qualification:First class scout or higher with active participation in previous 6 months. • Chaplain aide duties: • Assists the troop chaplain with religious services at troop activities. • Tells Scouts about the religious emblem program for their faith. • Makes sure religious holidays are considered during the troop program planning process. • Helps plan for religious observance in troop activities. • Sets a good example. • Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scoutspirit. • Attends 80% of Troops activities.

  26. DEN CHIEF • Position description: The den chief works with the Cub Scouts, Webelos Scouts, and den leaders in the Cub Scout pack. Appointed by SPL. • Reports to: The den leader in the pack and the assistant Scoutmaster for the new-Scout patrol in the troop. • Qualification:First class scout or higherwith active participation in previous 6 months. • Den chief duties: • Knows the purposes of Cub Scouting. • Helps Cub Scouts advance through Cub Scout ranks. • Encourages Cub Scouts to join a Boy Scout troop upon graduation. • Assists with activities in the den meetings and Is a friend to the boys in the den. • Helps out at weekly den meetings and monthly pack meetings . • Meets with adult members of the den, pack, and troop as necessary. • Sets the example and shows scout spirit. • Wears the uniform correctly. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Attends 80% of Troop activities. • Participates in Den chief training. • Manages the webelos overnighter project end to end with direction from SPL. Individual Scout Roles and Responsibilities

  27. Individual Scout Roles and Responsibilities Leave No Trace Trainer Position description: The leave no trace trainer serves to assure Troop 5 executes leave no trace in all endeavours. Appointed by the ASPL. Reports to: Assistant Senior Patrol Leader. Qualification: First class scout or higherwith active participation in previous 6 months. Webmaster duties: • Have a thorough understanding of and commitment to Leave No Trace. • Successfully complete the Leave No Trace Trainer training course. • Help minimize the troop’s impact on the land by teaching Scouts the principles of Leave No Trace. • Help ensure that the troop follows Leave No Trace principles on outings. • Set a good example. • Wear the Scout uniform correctly. • Live by the Scout Oath and Scout Law. • Show and help develop Scout spirit. • Obtains leave no trace training. • Attends 80% of Troop activities.

  28. Individual Scout Roles and Responsibilities • JUNIOR ASSISTANT SCOUTMASTER • Position description: The junior assistant Scoutmaster serves in the capacity of an assistant Scoutmaster except where legal age and maturity are required. He must be at least 16 years old and not yet 18. He is appointed by the Scoutmaster because of his leadership ability. • Reports to:The Scoutmaster • Junior assistant Scoutmaster duties: • Functions as an assistant Scoutmaster. • Performs duties as assigned by the Scoutmaster. • Sets a good example. • Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform. • Lives by the Scout Oath and Law. • Shows Scout spirit. • Attends 75% of Troop activities.

  29. Individual Scout Roles and Responsibilities Discussion: HOMEWORK • Each positions specific goal? For the next x months I will accomplish this x,y,z in this position? Defined deliverables. • Each positions measure(s) of Success? Measure of success is an objective method used for determining position responsibility was executed. • Develop an outline or procedure or update existing procedures for specific positions.

  30. Adult Positions Scoutmaster: • Train and guide boy leaders. • Work with other responsible adults to bring Scouting to boys. • Use the methods of Scouting to achieve the aims of Scouting. • Meet regularly with the patrol leaders’ council for training and coordination in planning troop activities. • Attend all troop meetings or, when necessary, arrange for a qualified adult substitute. • Attend troop committee meetings. • Conduct periodic parents’ sessions to share the program and encourage parent participation and cooperation. • Conduct Scoutmaster conferences for all rank advancements. • Provide a systematic recruiting plan for new members and see that they are promptly registered. • Delegate responsibility to other adults and groups (assistants, troop committee) so they have a real part in troop operations. • Conduct all activities under qualified leadership, safe conditions, and the policies of the chartered organization and the Boy Scouts of America. As you see, the Scoutmaster has many responsibilities. Assistant Scoutmasters: To fulfill his or her obligation to the troop, the Scoutmaster, with the assistance of the troop committee, recruits assistant Scoutmasters to help operate the troop. Each assistant Scoutmaster is assigned specific program duties and reports to the Scoutmaster. They also provide the two deep leadership required by the Boy Scouts of America (there must be at least two adults present at any Boy Scout activity). An assistant Scoutmaster may be 18 years old, but at least one in each troop should be 21 or older so he or she can serve in the Scoutmaster’s absence.

  31. Adult Positions Committee Chair • Supervises the Scoutmaster and committee members. • Recruits and approves Scoutmasters and committee members. Committee Member • Serves as a resource to the troop. • Works with an assigned officer. • Recruits consultants. Chartered Organization Representative • Serves as the liaison between the troop and the chartered organization. • Recruits the troop committee; approves Scoutmasters and committee members. • Participates in district leadership. Institutional Head or Executive Officer • Is the head of the chartered organization (may or may not be a Scouter).

  32. Individual Roles and Responsibilitiess Game: Role Balancing - Balloon Toss:

  33. Individual Roles and Responsibilitiess Role Balancing - Balloon Toss: Reflection: How well could the leader juggle all those balloons, and why? Why is it important to get everyone involved so that everyone has one role to fill?

  34. The Scout Led Troop Discussion: Briefly discuss leadership in Scouting and the value of the Scout-led troop.

  35. The Scout Led Troop Game: Yurt Circle.Play a teamwork game—experience cooperating as a group. (A yurt is a circular tent of felt or skins on a collapsible framework, originated by nomads in central Asia. Yurts are noteworthy structures because they derive their strength from having structural members that pull away from each other under tension, making them flexible yet strong, while most structures are supported by rigid members under compression, making them inflexible.)

  36. The Scout Led Troop Reflection: Lead a discussion regarding working together as a team and the purpose and value of the Scout-led troop.

  37. The Scout Led Troop • Some key teaching points: • Often, natural leaders will step in when a leader is needed to help the group succeed. • Sometimes, the group can accomplish a task through group cooperation and a mutual interest in success without a specific leader. • Most everything in Scouting can be accomplished by Scouts of various ages and sizes by working together as a team and perhaps making a few adjustments here and there (e.g., by switching people around the circle or coaching a younger Scout about a successful technique). • Scouting gives Scouts the opportunity to learn and practice leadership skills. • Scouts will learn to lead by practicing leading and experiencing the results of their hands-on leadership efforts. • If there are additional challenging roles or activities in your troop that the Scouts are ready to accept, coach them through identifying the first few steps to start implementing the change, or identifying someone to be responsible for coordinating that effort later.

  38. The Scout Led Troop Discussion: Discuss the Patrol Leaders’ Council in Your Troop.

  39. The Scout Led Troop Game: Helium Stick --experience working together and cooperating as a group.

  40. The Scout Led Troop Reflection: Lead a discussion regarding working together as a team and the purpose and value of having the Scouts as the leaders of the troop.

  41. The Scout Led Troop • Some key teaching points: • The stick has a tendency to rise because the collective force used to keep fingers in contact with the stick is often greater than the gravitational force (weight) of the stick. • Cooperation, teamwork, and coaching each other were likely keys to everyone getting the stick to settle down and being able to manage the stick to the ground together. • Coach the Scouts through developing possible ways to implement their improvement ideas for the patrol leaders’ council meetings.

  42. The Scout Led Troop:Leadership Discuss Leadership: Ask the Scouts to define leadership. Introduce the troop position description cards. Give each Scout the card for his role.

  43. The Scout Led Troop: Leadership Group Discussion:Review some tips for being a good leader in the troop. Keep your word. Don’t make promises you can’t keep. Be fair to all. A good leader shows no favorites. Don’t allow friendships to keep you from being fair to all members of your troop or patrol. Be a good communicator. You don’t need a commanding voice to be a good leader, but you must be willing to step out front with an effective “Let’s go.” A good leader knows how to get and give information so that everyone understands what’s happening. Be flexible. Not everything goes as planned. Be prepared to shift to “Plan B” when “Plan A” doesn’t work. Think about “Plan C.” Be organized. The time you spend planning will be repaid many times over. Delegate. Some leaders assume that the task will not get done unless they do it themselves. Most people like to be challenged with a task. Empower your team members to do things they have never tried. Set an example. The most important thing you can do is lead by example. Whatever you do, your troop members are likely to do the same. A cheerful attitude can keep everyone’s spirits up. Be consistent. Nothing is more confusing than a leader who acts one way one moment and another way a short time later. If your troop knows what to expect from you, they will more likely respond positively to your leadership. Give praise. The best way to get credit is to give it away. Often a “nice job” is all the praise necessary to make a Scout feel he is contributing to the efforts of the troop. Ask for help. Don’t be embarrassed to ask for help. You have many resources at your disposal. When confronted with a situation you don’t know how to handle, ask someone with more experience for some advice and direction.

  44. The Scout Led Troop: Leadership Group Discussion:Review some tips for being a good leader in the troop.

  45. The Scout Led Troop: Leadership Game: Willow in the Wind. Play a game to get the group up and moving after the discussion and to continue to develop trust and confidence together as a team.

  46. Servant Leadership Discussion: Lead a discussion of why Scouts should choose to be leaders.

  47. Servant Leadership Reflection:Lead a discussion about servant leadership.

  48. Servant Leadership • Some key teaching points: • Servant leadership is about making the choice to lead, to give more than you receive, and to make a • difference. • Effective servant leaders care about others, about helping others succeed, and about making the group • successful. • It is important to build up the idea and value of servant leadership in our Scout and adult leaders. • A good group leader is focused on the success of the members of his team—as individuals and as a team. • Servant leaders understand what success looks like not only for the team as a whole, but also for each • member of the team. • Group members can see when a leader cares about their needs and is focused on their success. That service earns him the group’s respect. When he has that respect, the Scout has earned the title and role of leader. • A troop leader who seeks to serve knows his troop members well enough to help them succeed, helps his troop through its day-to-day operation, manages and delegates troop duties, focuses on how to help all members be successful in their assigned tasks, and works to bring the troop together as a team. • Servant leaders want to lead because they know they can help make a difference and provide a better • experience for every individual.

  49. Module 1 wrap up • Summary of module 1 • Course Introduction • Troop Organization • Scout Led Troop • Servant Leadership

  50. Module 2 Break