slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
1. “I Have a Dream” Martin Luther King, Jr. August 28, 1963 Washington, DC PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
1. “I Have a Dream” Martin Luther King, Jr. August 28, 1963 Washington, DC

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 12

1. “I Have a Dream” Martin Luther King, Jr. August 28, 1963 Washington, DC - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 90 Views
  • Uploaded on

The Top 10 Speeches of the 20th Century As determined by 137 public address scholars in a study performed by Texas A & M and University of Wisconsin-Madison. . 1. “I Have a Dream” Martin Luther King, Jr. August 28, 1963 Washington, DC.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about '1. “I Have a Dream” Martin Luther King, Jr. August 28, 1963 Washington, DC' - cade


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

The Top 10 Speeches of the 20th CenturyAs determined by 137 public address scholars in a study performed by Texas A & M and University of Wisconsin-Madison.

1 i have a dream martin luther king jr august 28 1963 washington dc
1. “I Have a Dream”Martin Luther King, Jr.August 28, 1963Washington, DC

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today.

http://usinfo.state.gov/usa/infousa/facts/democrac/38.htm

2 inaugural address john f kennedy january 20 1961 washington dc
2. Inaugural AddressJohn F. KennedyJanuary 20, 1961Washington, DC

And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you--ask what you can do for your country.

My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.

http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/presiden/inaug/kennedy.htm

3 first inaugural address franklin d roosevelt march 4 1933 washington dc
3. First Inaugural AddressFranklin D. RooseveltMarch 4, 1933Washington, DC

We face the arduous days that lie before us in the warm courage of national unity; with the clear consciousness of seeking old and precious moral values; with the clean satisfaction that comes from the stern performance of duty by old and young alike. We aim at the assurance of a rounded and permanent national life.

http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/index.php?pid=14473

4 war message franklin d roosevelt december 8 1948 washington dc
4. War MessageFranklin D. RooseveltDecember 8, 1948Washington, DC

Yesterday, December 7, 1941—a date which will live in infamy—the United States of American was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.

http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5166/

5 keynote speech to the democratic national convention barbara jordan july 12 1976 new york ny
5. Keynote Speech to the Democratic National ConventionBarbara JordanJuly 12, 1976New York, NY

That we will cease to be one nation and become instead a collection of interest groups: city against suburb, region against region, individual against individual. Each seeking to satisfy private wants.

If that happens, who then will speak for America?

Who then will speak for the common good?

http://www.infoplease.com/t/hist/jordan-1976dnc/

6 my side of the story checkers richard m nixon september 23 1952 los angeles ca
6. “My Side of the Story”(“Checkers”)Richard M. NixonSeptember 23, 1952Los Angeles, CA

I have a theory, too, that the best and only answer to a smear or to an honest misunderstanding of the facts is to tell the truth. And that's why I'm here tonight. I want to tell you my side of the case.

http://www.watergate.info/nixon/checkers-speech.shtml

7 the ballot or the bullet malcolm x april 3 1964 cleveland oh
7. “The Ballot or the Bullet”Malcolm XApril 3, 1964Cleveland, OH

“No, if you never see me another time in your life, if I die in the morning, I'll die saying one thing: the ballot or the bullet, the ballot or the bullet.”

http://www.hartford-hwp.com/archives/45a/065.html

8 address to the nation on the challenger ronald reagan january 28 1986 washington dc
8. Address to the Nation on the ChallengerRonald ReaganJanuary 28, 1986Washington, DC

And I want to say something to the school children of America who were watching the live coverage of the shuttle's takeoff. I know it is hard to understand, but sometimes painful things like this happen. It's all part of the process of exploration and discovery. It's all part of taking a chance and expanding man's horizons. The future doesn't belong to the fainthearted; it belongs to the brave. The Challenger crew was pulling us into the future, and we'll continue to follow them.

http://www.reaganfoundation.org/reagan/speeches/challenger.asp

9 speech to the greater houston ministerial association john f kennedy september 12 1960 houston tx
9. Speech to the Greater Houston Ministerial AssociationJohn F. KennedySeptember 12, 1960Houston, TX

For while this year it may be a Catholic against whom the finger of suspicion is pointed, in other years it has been -- and may someday be again -- a Jew, or a Quaker, or a Unitarian, or a Baptist. It was Virginia's harassment of Baptist preachers, for example, that led to Jefferson's statute of religious freedom. Today, I may be the victim, but tomorrow it may be you -- until the whole fabric of our harmonious society is ripped apart at a time of great national peril.

http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/jfkhoustonministers.html

10 address to congress on the voting rights act lyndon b johnson march 15 1965 washington dc
10. Address to Congress on the Voting Rights ActLyndon B. JohnsonMarch 15, 1965Washington, DC

I want to be the President who educated young children to the wonders of their world.

I want to be the President who helped to feed the hungry and to prepare them to be taxpayers instead of taxeaters.

I want to be the President who helped the poor to find their own way and who protected the right of every citizen to vote in every election.

I want to be the President who helped to end hatred among his fellow men and who promoted love among the people of all races and all regions and all parties.

I want to be the President who helped to end war among the brothers of this earth.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/presidents/36_l_johnson/psources/ra_voting.html