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INTRODUCTION PowerPoint Presentation
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INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION

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INTRODUCTION

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  1. Does time lead to greater growth? Time since loss and posttraumatic growth in a sample of individuals bereaved by suicide.Melinda Moore, Ph.D. & Christopher W. Drapeau, M.A.College of Social Work, University of Kentucky; Department of Educational Psychology, Ball State University INTRODUCTION RESULTS RESULTS Posttraumatic Growth (PTG) is a construct of positive psychological change that occurs as the result of one’s struggle with a highly challenging, stressful, and traumatic event. Tedeschi and Calhoun (2004) conceptualize PTG as a process that occurs closer in time to the traumatic event than farther away. PTG is measured by the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI, Tedeschi & Calhoun, 1996) and produces an overall score, as well as five domain scores. These five PTG domains are: I) Relating to Others II) New Possibilities III) Personal Strength IV) Spiritual Change V) Appreciation for Life The current study examined the relationship between PTG and the amount of time that elapsed since these individuals were bereaved by suicide, as well as feelings of closeness and relationship levels. Four Posttraumatic Growth Domains Emerge No differences between those who were recently bereaved or less recently bereaved CONCLUSION METHOD • Contrary to theory, these results suggest that time post-loss does not have an effect on PTG in adults bereaved by suicide • PTG did not differ on feelings of closeness • PTG did not differ on relationship level • Feelings of closeness are related to relationship level • Four PTG domains emerge: Relating to Others, Personal Strength, Spiritual Change, and Appreciation of Life • In the current study, 114 suicide-bereaved individuals were recruited through nationally recognized suicide survivor support organizations, the Suicidology listserv, and snowball sampling. • Respondents were directed to a website www.posttraumaticgrowth.com where they completed a survey that queried for demographics as well as PTG using the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI). • Individuals of all relationships to the deceased were recruited, including nuclear family, extended family, friends, and co-workers. • Time post-loss was grouped into five groups: less than five years, 5-9 years, 10-14 years, 15-19 years, and more than 20 years. • Respondents were asked to rate their feelings of closeness to the decedent. • An independent-samples t-test was conducted to compare PTG on: • Respondents recently bereaved by suicide (less than 5 years) versus not recently bereaved by suicide (5 years to 20+ years) • Nuclear Family (spouse, parent, child, sibling) versus Extended Family (grandparent, aunt/uncle, cousin, friend, co-worker) • Those who feel “very close” versus those who are “not very close” • A factor analysis was conducted to determine item loadings on PTG domains using Varimax Rotation and Eigenvalue of 1 References Tedeschi, R.G. & Calhoun, L.G. (1996). The Post-Traumatic Growth Inventory: Measuring the positive legacy of trauma. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 9, 455-471. Tedeschi, R. G. & Calhoun, L.G. (2004). The foundations of posttraumatic growth: new considerations. Psychological Inquiry, 15, 93-102.