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The Incredible Journey Vocabulary. Week 4 January 2-6, 2012. connoisseur.

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the incredible journey vocabulary

The Incredible Journey Vocabulary

Week 4

January 2-6, 2012

connoisseur
connoisseur
  • Connoisseur is a NOUN. Using connoisseur correctly in a sentence requires you to remember not only that it is defined as “an expert judge in an art or in manners of taste” but also that it a person, place, thing, or idea.
  • For example: Max was raised going to museums, learning about painting and sculpture, and collected art as an adult, so he was considered a connoisseur in the field of art.
  • Notice that the word is not used as an action or state of being, nor is it used to describe a noun.
debonair
debonair
  • Debonair is an ADJECTIVE. Using debonair correctly in a sentence requires you to remember not only that it is defined as “suave; worldly” but also that it a word that describes a person, place, thing, or idea. *It is also important to remember that debonair is a word typically used to describe males in our society.
  • For example: Martin impressed his date as being debonair when he asked her what she was going to order at dinner and then ordered on her behalf.
  • Notice that the word is not used as an action or state of being, nor is it used as the subject (noun) of the sentence)
dishevel
dishevel
  • Dishevel is a VERB. Using dishevel correctly in a sentence requires you to remember not only that it is defined as “to let down, as hair, or let hang in loose disorder, as clothing” but also that it is an action or state of being.
  • For example: Sometimes middle school boys don’t pay attention to manners when they are eating and end up disheveled.
  • Notice that the word is not used to describe a noun, nor is it a person, place, thing, or idea.
encroach
encroach
  • Encroach is a VERB. Using encroach correctly in a sentence requires you to remember not only that it is defined as “to trespass upon the property, domain, or rights of another, especially gradually or stealthily” but also that it is an action or state of being.
  • For example: I prefer to have desks in my classroom, rather than tables, because some students make a habit of encroaching on the workspace of others when they are at tables.
  • Notice that the word is not used to describe a noun, nor is it a person, place, thing, or idea.
famish
famish
  • Using famish correctly in a sentence requires you to remember not only that it is defined as “to suffer or cause to suffer extreme hunger” but also that it is an action or state of being.
  • For example: Animals who are unable to hunt for their own food are famished if the humans responsible for them do not feed them.
  • Notice that the word is not used to describe a noun, nor is it a person, place, thing, or idea.
fastidious
fastidious
  • Fastidious is an ADJECTIVE. Using fastidious correctly in a sentence requires you to remember not only that it is defined as “hard to please” but also that it a word that describes a person, place, thing, or idea..
  • For example: My niece, Emily, was a fastidious eater as a little girl; we could never get her to eat the same thing twice.
  • Notice that the word is not used as an action or state of being, nor is it used as the subject (noun) of the sentence)
lichen
lichen
  • Lichen is a NOUN. Using lichen correctly in a sentence requires you to remember not only that it is defined as “an organism composed of a fungus in union with alga, commonly forming patches on rocks and trees” but also that it a person, place, thing, or idea.
  • For example: Notice that the word is not used as an action or state of being, nor is it used to describe a noun.
maraud
maraud
  • Maraud is a VERB. Using maraud correctly in a sentence requires you to remember not only that it is defined as “to rove in quest of plunder; raid” but also that it is an action or state of being.
  • For example: Pirates were known for marauding and being dangerous.
  • Notice that the word is not used to describe a noun, nor is it a person, place, thing, or idea.
nomad
nomad
  • Nomad is a NOUN. Using nomad correctly in a sentence requires you to remember not only that it is defined as “any wanderer” but also that it a person, place, thing, or idea.
  • For example: Melody was a nomad who moved from place to place frequently, which made it difficult to send her mail.
  • Notice that the word is not used as an action or state of being, nor is it used to describe a noun.
requiem
requiem
  • Requiem is a NOUN. Using requiem correctly in a sentence requires you to remember not only that it is defined as “a musical service or hymn for the repose of the dead” but also that it a person, place, thing, or idea.
  • For example: Since my father had been in the Army, his funeral included a requiem of ‘Taps’.
  • Notice that the word is not used as an action or state of being, nor is it used to describe a noun.