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Class Starter. Look at your Unit I Plan Using a highlighter, identify the target(s) or “I can” statements that we cover. “I can” statements will be your test!. “The State” What are the four characteristics of a state?. Nations, countries, and states all refer to the same thing!

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class starter
Class Starter
  • Look at your Unit I Plan
    • Using a highlighter, identify the target(s) or “I can” statements that we cover.
    • “I can” statements will be your test!
the state what are the four characteristics of a state
“The State”What are the four characteristics of a state?
  • Nations, countries, and states all refer to the same thing!
  • In order to be a “state”, you must have four things:
    • Territory
    • Population
    • Sovereignty (ability to make own laws)
    • Government
what are the four theories of the origin of the state
What are the four theories of the Origin of the State?
  • Major Political Ideas (Origin of the State)
  • Force Theory: 1 person/group forces power and submission of other people
slide4
Evolutionary Theory: State developed naturally out of the “Family.”
    • Head of Family  Head of Government
slide5
Divine Right Theory: Ordained by God
    • God gave them the right to rule
slide6
Social Contract Theory: State exists to serve the will of the people
    • People are the source of power – free to give or withhold power
traditional forms of government
Traditional Forms of Government
  • Feudalism: People are bound to a King (loyal) and in return King provides protection
democracy
Democracy
  • Of the people, for the people (People are source of power)
  • Equal rights (protection of rights)
  • Representative government
dictatorship
Dictatorship
  • Not responsible for policies
  • Autocracy/Oligarchy
  • Authoritarian – absolute power
  • One leader (Despot)
  • Governs without consent of the people
unitary
Unitary
  • Centralized government (one unit)
  • Limited local government
  • One legislature (created by constitution)
federal
Federal
  • Division of powers
  • Central & Local Governments (National, State, and Local Government)
  • Each have own set of powers
  • Separation of Powers (3 branches)
confederate
Confederate
  • Limited powers – only handles matters that member states assign to it
  • Central organization – alliance of individual states
  • No power to make laws that apply to individual states
  • Come together for a common cause
presidential
Presidential
  • Two branches are equal and separate
  • Executive Branch led by President
  • Executive & Legislative branches are popularly elected
parliamentary
Parliamentary
  • Executive and Legislative branch are combined
  • Executive must answer to Parliament (Legislature)
  • Executive (Prime Minister) is elected by Parliament (Legislature)
slide20
Patrick Henry, Thomas Jefferson, Wonder Woman, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, James Madison
slide21
English Colonists brought ordered, limited, and representative government
    • Ordered: Justice of the Peace, Sheriff, Counties, etc.
    • Limited: Restricted power and individual rights
    • Representative: Government serves the will of the people
slide22
Influential Documents
    • Magna Carta (1215):granted Englishmen certain rights (trial by jury, protection of property, etc.)
      • Power of the monarchy was not absolute
    • The Petition of Right (1628):limited kings power
    • The English Bill of Rights (1689): written to prevent abuses by the King/Queen (right to a fair trial, no excessive bail, no cruel and unusual punishment)
john locke
John Locke
  • Natural Rights: rights inherent in human beings (life, liberty & property)
  • Consent of the Governed: government gets its authority from the people
  • Limited Government: restrictions should be placed on the government to protect the natural rights of the people
comparisons natural rights
Comparisons – Natural Rights

Thomas Jefferson – Declaration of Independence

John Locke

“The state of nature has a law to govern it”

“Life, Liberty and property”

“Laws of Nature and Nature’s God”

“Life, Liberty and the pursuit of happiness”

slide26
Need for a Stronger Government
  • Philadelphia Convention, May, 1787
  • Delegates agreed to create a new government
  • 55/74 delegates attended, 12/13 States attended
  • Framers (all had distinguished backgrounds and most had education)
  • Independence Hall – Sworn to Secrecy – Extremely HOT!
virginia plan
Virginia Plan
  • 3 Branches (Legislative, Executive, & Judicial)
    • Legislative: Bicameral, decided by population & monetary contributions, House – popular election, Senate – House elected
new jersey plan
New Jersey Plan
  • 3 Branches (Legislative, Executive, & Judicial)
    • Legislative: Unicameral, Each state has equal representation
how should the states be represented in congress
How should the States be represented in Congress?
  • Connecticut Compromise
      • Bicameral Legislature: House – Population, Senate – equal representation
  • Sources of the Constitution
      • British tradition, State Governments, and John Locke’s Two Treatises of Government
date finished september 17 1787
Date Finished: September 17, 1787
  • Federalists vs.
    • Favored ratification
    • Madison & Hamilton
    • Federalist Papers

Anti-Federalists

  • Opposed ratification
  • Jefferson
  • Believed National Government was too powerful
  • Wanted Bill of Rights
slide31
September 13, 1788: 11/13 States ratified the Constitution
  • New York City – Capital, Congress located on Wall Street
  • April 30, 1789: George Washington took the oath of office
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