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The Problems of PG-13 History. UNC-Wilmington Susan Lamm Michael Parker Ashley Skinner Amanda Thurston. United States History. NCSCS Objective 11.04: Identify the causes of the United States’ involvement in Vietnam and examine how this involvement affected society. F-bombs and Napalm.

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the problems of pg 13 history

The Problems of PG-13 History

UNC-Wilmington

Susan Lamm

Michael Parker

Ashley Skinner

Amanda Thurston

united states history

United States History

NCSCS Objective 11.04: Identify the causes of the United States’ involvement in Vietnam and examine how this involvement affected society.

slide8

“Historically, Native people have been portrayed in textbooks in narrow or inaccurate ways...”

-excerpt from NMAI

truths myths misconceptions
Truths, Myths & Misconceptions

Native Americans

?

1st called “Indians” by Columbus, who thought he’d landed in India- the name stuck

Gee…

thanks?

Didn’t have adequate clothing!

Ran around “naked”

No “towns”- no “houses”- roamed the land: How “Primitive”!

Europeans- especially English- “civilized”

Native Americans

slide10

I never thought about it like that before…

Our culture was different, but not “Primitive”!

“Indians” had an advanced economy that included trade with other tribes, and many had some form of money.

Native Americans had sophisticated legal systems that incorporated treaties and resolved disputes.

Did not understand the European concept of "land title”. They believed you “borrowed” land for farming and living, then returned it to Mother Earth when you no longer needed it.

first english settlers met with nomadic tribes pack and go housing genius engineering
First English settlers met with nomadic tribes- pack-and-go housing- genius engineering!

“Clothing” represented more than just clothing: If a deer was killed for food, the rest of the deer would be used for clothing, shoes, housing… would have been a sacrilege to waste any part of the animal-

One piece “garments” were most basic, sewn from one skin/hide;

Two pieces represented wealth & tribal status;

Three piece “garments” were usually worn by Princesses & VIP’s, sewn from several skins and were of the best quality!

Decoration was individualistic- reflected your skill, creativity, & your hierarchy within the tribe. Animal bone, teeth, feathers, seashells were often used.

Awesome field trip idea!

National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, DC

slide12

“Good Indians”

Portrayed as heroes for helping the “white man”

Squanto

Sacajawea

Pocahontas

slide13

Sitting Bull

“BAD Indians”

  • Lakota Chief & Holy Man
  • Defiant toward American Military
  • Brutally massacred Gen. Custer & men of 7th Calvary @ Little Big Horn

Geronimo

Often portrayed in textbooks as viscous warriors who ruthlessly murdered the “white man”

  • Despised & killed Mexicans & whites in Mexican territory
  • Led revolts against white settlers
  • Kidnapped innocent white child for revenge
slide14

Sitting Bull

Or loyal to his people, their land, & their freedom?

  • Lakota Chief & Holy Man
  • Defiant toward American Military
  • Brutally massacred Gen. Custer & men of 7th Calvary @ Little Big Horn

“whites wanted the gold on our sacred tribal lands- weren’t playing fair!”

“I had to defend our sacred ancestors…”

…Or just a fighter for his people???

Geronimo

Name Mexicans gave him- real name: Goyathlay

  • Apache “Warrior”
  • Despised & killed Mexicans
  • Led revolts against white settlers
  • Kidnapped innocent white child

Because they murdered & robbed his tribe in a sneak attack!

Tried to re-claim Apache lands being settled & destroyed

Boy cried when rescued; returned to parents by force- wanted to remain with Apache!

slide16

8th Grade Unit 1 Objective: “students examine the roles of people, events, and issues in North Carolina history that have contributedto the unique character of the state today “

4th Grade COMPETENCY GOAL 2: The learner will examine the importance of the role of ethnic groups and examine the multiple roles they have played in the development of North Carolina.

1.04 Evaluate the impact of the Columbian Exchange on the cultures of American Indians, Europeans, and Africans.

1.07 Describe the roles and contributions of diverse groups, such as American Indians…

2.01 Locate and describe American Indians…

2.03 Describe the similarities and differences among people of NC...

2.04 Describe how different ethnic groups have influenced the culture, customs & history of NC…

Opportunity is everywhere!

world history
World History
  • 9th Grade

3.04 Examine European exploration and analyze the forces that caused and allowed the acquisition of colonial possessions and trading privileges in Africa, Asia, and the Americas.

3.05 Cite the effects of European expansion on Africans, pre-Columbian Americans, Asians, and Europeans.

christopher columbus

Christopher Columbus

Hero or Villain?

what do our texts say textbook a
What do our texts say?(Textbook A)
  • “An important figure in the history of Spanish exploration. Educated Europeans knew that the world was round, but had little understanding of its circumference or the size of the the continent of Asia. Convinced that the circumference of Earth was not as great as others thought, Columbus believed that he could reach Asia by sailing west instead of east around Africa. Columbus persuaded Queen Isabella of Spain to finance an exploratory expedition. In October 1492, he reached Americas, where he explored the coastline of Cuba and the island of Hispaniola. Columbus believed he had reached Asia. Through three more voyages, he sought in vain to find a route through the other islands to the Asian mainland. In his four voyages, Columbus reached all the major islands of the Caribbean and Honduras in Central America- all of which he called the Indies.”
primary sources found in textbook a
Primary Sources found in Textbook A
  • “Columbus Lands in the Americas”

- Christopher Columbus

Even the questions represent him in one way…

1. Why did Columbus give the peoples of Hispaniola “a thousand handsome good things”?

what about another point of view
What about another point of view?
  • Bartoleme de las Casas gave us another first hand account of what REALLY went on between heroic Christopher Columbus and the “indians”
  • Only 1 text even mentions him or his resource.
christopher columbus and the slave trade
Christopher Columbus and the Slave Trade
  • New evidence that Christopher Columbus suggested going to Africa to get SLAVES for new colonies BEFORE slave trade began…
  • WHY DO WE HAVE A HOLIDAY FOR THIS MAN?
resources
Resources
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74eF8GjqvOY
  • Bartoleme de las Casas, The Destruction of the Indies
  • Hippocampus’ “Christopher Columbus”
civics in the high school classroom

Civics in the High School Classroom

Competency Goal 3: The learner will analyze how state and local government is established by the North Carolina Constitution.

Objective 3:06: What does “equal protection under the law” mean? How does the 14th Amendment extend rights to all citizens?

civics textbooks
Civics Textbooks
  • Saffell, David C. Civics: Responsibilities and Citizenship. Glencoe McGraw-Hill, 1996
    • four paragraphs to “The Civil Rights Movement” section
    • addresses how state laws denied African Americans the same rights as other Americans
    • The actual movement and what it achieved is summed up in one paragraph
  • Banks, James A, et al. Our Nation. New York: Macmillan McGraw-Hill, 2003.
    • gives a much broader view of the Civil Rights Movement
    • does not go into specifics concerning any one action or event
freedom rides
Freedom Rides
  • Saffell book vs. Banks text
  • PG-13 version:
    • http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/eyesontheprize/index.html
    • “In Jackson, the Freedom Riders were arrested and jailed.”
freedom rides31
Freedom Rides
  • PG-13 version, continued
  • www.democraticunderground.com
  • “…In some places, like Alabama, people would attack the Freedom Riders because they didn't want to change. “
  • http://www.historyonthenet.com
freedom rides32
Freedom Rides
  • REALITY:
  • http://www.ibiblio.org/sncc/rides.html
  • http://www.core-online.org/History/freedom%20rides.htm
freedom rides33
Freedom Rides
  • REALITY, continued
  • http://www.democracynow.org/2010/2/1/the_freedom_riders
united states history36

United States History

NCSCS Objective 11.03: Identify major social movements including, but not limited to, those involving women, young people, and the environment, and evaluate the impact of these movements on the United States’ society.

resources41
Resources
  • World History
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74eF8GjqvOY
  • Bartoleme de las Casas, The Destruction of the Indies
  • Hippocampus’ “Christopher Columbus”
  • US History
  • Elizabeth Omara-Otunnu. University of Connecticut Advance. “Napalm Survivor Tells of Healing After Vietnam War.” Available from www.advance.uconn.edu/2004/041108/04110803.htm.
  • GLBTQ: An encyclopedia of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer culture. Available from www.glbtq.com.
resources42

Resources

CIVICS:

Saffell, David C. Civics: Responsibilities and Citizenship. Glencoe McGraw-Hill, 1996

Banks, James A, et al. Our Nation. New York: Macmillan McGraw-Hill, 2003.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/eyesontheprize/index.html

www.democraticunderground.com

http://www.historyonthenet.com

http://www.ibiblio.org/sncc/rides.html

http://www.core-online.org/History/freedom%20rides.htm

http://www.democracynow.org/2010/2/1/the_freedom_riders