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English Language Learners. Annalisa Miner Cathy Blanchard April 10, 2013. Free Powerpoint Templates. Opening Revisit. Take 2 minutes to look through your notes and materials from the last session Partner revisits and discussion with guided questions. Discuss.

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slide1
English LanguageLearners

Annalisa Miner

Cathy Blanchard

April 10, 2013

Free Powerpoint Templates

opening revisit
Opening Revisit
  • Take 2 minutes to look through your notes and materials from the last session
  • Partner revisits and discussion with guided questions
discuss
Discuss
  • How many years does it take to learn social language?
  • What are some examples of social language?
discuss1
Discuss
  • How many years does it take to learn academic language?
  • Provide some examples of academic language being used in your classroom.
discuss2
Discuss
  • Describe a level 1 student

(characteristics, the lang. they have, etc…)

Hint – consider the Language Acquisition Chart and the cloze reading activity from last time (brightly colored sheets)

discuss3
Discuss
  • Describe a level 3 student

(characteristics, the lang. they have, etc…

Hint – consider the Language Acquisition Chart and the cloze reading activity from last time (brightly colored sheets)

objectives staff will be able to swbat
Objectives: Staff will be able to (SWBAT):
  • examine cultural differences and consider personal assumptions/connection in relating to their students
  • consider discourse patterns and implications for work
  • consider the different levels of language acquisition and what students CAN DO
  • compare where their current ELL students are at (language proficiency) and investigate strategies for implementation
culture activity
Culture Activity

On your index card write down:

  • name
  • gender
  • ethnicity
  • religion
  • language
outcomes research from the midwest equity center
Outcomes(research from the Midwest Equity Center)

The pattern is:

  • in Euro-Americans to get rid of race/ethnicity 1st and tend to hold onto spirituality.
  • for children of color ethnicity and language tend to be the most important.
  • for Hispanics it's their language 

Why do you think Euro-Americans get rid of race 1st?

Why do you think they hold on to spirituality?

What do we ask students/families to give up?

what is culture
Heritage

Beliefs

Customs

Group with commonalities

Some are by choice, some are not

Think about the “cultures” you belong to

Think about the “cultures” your students belong to

Tonnie Martinez, ICLC 2010

What is Culture?
what greatness means is dependent on your culture
What greatness means… is dependent on your culture!
  • Tasks before people
  • People before tasks
  • We need to respect, honor, and show value for student’s cultures and diversity
  • Some times need to check our ‘assumptions’
i value you
I Value You!
  • How are we valuing our students cultures?
  • ASK, ASK, ASK!!
discourse patterns are
Discourse Patterns are:
  • Ways of thinking
  • The logical arrangement of ideas (dependent on culture)
  • Different languages organize information differently
discourse patterns
Discourse Patterns*

Germanic

(English, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Greek, Albanian)

Direct, linear, state the topic, explain and conclude.

Ex: I need a pair of shoes. I’m going to the store. I’ll buy some running shoes.

* Adaptation from original study by Robert Kaplan – L. Valdez Pierce, 2001

Kaplan, R. (1966). Cultural Thought Patterns in Intercultural Education. Language

Learning, 16, 1-20. (Also, Tonnie Martinez, ICLC 2010.)

semitic arabic languages
Semitic(Arabic languages)

A repetitive, recursive structure.

Ex: I need shoes. I’ll go to the store.

I need shoes. I should measure my feet.

I really need shoes. My old ones are worn out.

asian
Asian

A circular pattern.

Ex: In the winter, the ground is frozen. In the summer, it is hot and there are sand burrs. So your feet can get frostbite or burns. Shoes can be useful.

romance languages french italian spanish
Romance Languages(French, Italian, Spanish)

Linear, but with digressions which tend to involve family and friends.

Ex: I need a pair of shoes. I’ll get some running shoes. You know, my sister got some running shoes a while ago at J.C. Penney’s. They gave her blisters, but they were cheap. Maybe we should not go to Penney’s to look for shoes.

slavic polish czech russian
Slavic(Polish, Czech, Russian)

Some of the contents of text may appear to be extraneous and digressive, swinging between extreme points.

Ex: I need a pair of shoes. You know back in _____ they have the worst factories. You can’t get a decent pair of shoes there. I’m glad to buy shoes here.

implications for educators
Implications for Educators
  • Discourse patterns are tied to literacy skills.
  • Difficult for students to read and write standard American English if they do not know the discourse pattern expected in expository compositions or in informational oral presentations.
  • We MUST explicitly teach students the discourse pattern of American English along with subject area content.
recommended strategies according to montano harmon
Recommended Strategies(according to Montano-Harmon)
  • Use skeleton outline (for lectures, videos, readings, combined with information about the subject being taught); used for development of English for expository writing for comprehension in content areas
  • Use doodles, little pictures, boxes to show what they need to do
  • Do ½ page summaries; using bullets, clip together, then ready for writing an essay
  • Record skeleton outlines and ½ page summaries on a webcast (auditory learning); students can listen to school, car, phone (great for special education students)
  • Use techniques that organize information (multiple modalities, analogies, graphic organizers)
can do descriptors
CAN DO descriptors
  • Take a look at your Student Goal Sheet
  • Look at the levels of your students
  • Does this align with your expectations and task?
  • Can use this as ‘check’ and to get ideas on appropriate strategies and tasks for students at their proficiency levels.
slide24
erudition

How many words do average middle class students have?

  • Kindergarten – 5,000
  • First grade – 10,000
  • Third grade – 14,000 – 24,000
  • Vocabulary growth grades 3-12 is about +4,000 words per year
slide25
Research
  • English Language Learners (ELL) enter 1st grade with a vocabulary ranging from 10 to 2000 words in English.
  • English speaking, average middle class students, enter 1st grade with about 10,000 words.
slide26
Cunningham (2000) found that vocabulary knowledge in the first grade predicted students’ reading comprehension in their junior year of high school.

The gap continues even after schooling unless there is a concentrated intervention.

Research on Vocabulary

research on vocabulary
Research on Vocabulary
  • Research studies demonstrate that vocabulary development helps close the achievement gap for English language learners and struggling students.
  • There is a 99.9% correlation between a student’s vocabulary and school achievement.
  • Research shows that learning 5-7 words a week does not close the achievement gap for ELLs or students who are performing at the basic or below basic level. Students need 10-15 words a day.
  • Educators may not immediately see language deficiencies in young school age children.
  • Research from Dr. Linda Ventriglia
ell strategy flipbooks
ELL Strategy Flipbooks
  • Find a tab that is of interest to you
    • Keep in mind your student goal sheet
  • 5 minutes to go on a ‘scavenger hunt’ for ideas, mark in books!
  • Group sharing
keys to remember
Keys to Remember
  • Know student’s level of English proficiency
    • Then consider strategies for them to access the core curriculum
    • Remember level 3 and 4 students have good oral language, but need academic supports
  • Learn about their culture
  • ADD to and encourage their language and culture!!
  • Keep ELs with the group AND highest trained educators
  • Utilize ESL resources in the district!
  • Take students where they are at…and push forward! 
objectives staff will be able to swbat1
Objectives: Staff will be able to (SWBAT):
  • examine cultural differences and consider personal assumptions/connection in relating to their students
  • consider discourse patterns and implications for work
  • consider the different levels of language acquisition and what students CAN DO
  • compare where their current ELL students are at and investigate strategies for implementation
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