slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Advocacy Toolkit PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Advocacy Toolkit

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 21

Advocacy Toolkit - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 121 Views
  • Uploaded on

Advocacy Toolkit. v.10-2008. How to convince stakeholders to support development education (DE)? A toolkit in three parts: 1 Arguments What is DE? Why is it important? Who are the actors? 2 Methods Principles of and approaches to successful lobbying 3 Examples

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Advocacy Toolkit' - bryce


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Advocacy Toolkit

v.10-2008

How to convince

stakeholders to support

development education (DE)?

A toolkit in three parts:

1 Arguments

What is DE? Why is it important? Who are the actors?

2 Methods

Principles of and approaches to successful lobbying

3 Examples

Who did it well? Spotlights on Spain, Poland

and the European multi stakeholder process on DE

Arguments (1/21)

slide2

What is DE?

Before starting any advocacy activity, a clear understanding of the topic should be shared.

The following four slides recall basic definitions and principles of development education.

Please refer to the DEEEP website for further details, especially to the European Development Education Consensus:

http://www.deeep.org/deconsensusprocess.html

Arguments (2/21)

slide3

Our definition of DE

Development education is an active learning process, founded on values of solidarity, equality, inclusion and co-operation.

It enables people to move from basic awareness of international development priorities and sustainable human development, through understanding of the causes and effects of global issues, to personal involvement and informed action.

Development education fosters the full participation of all citizens in world-wide poverty eradication, and the fight against exclusion. It seeks to influence more just and sustainable economic, social, environmental, and human rights based national and international policies.

definition approved by DEF and CONCORD GA in 2004

What is DE?

Arguments (3/21)

slide4

DE definition diagram

Development Education

values

solidarity, co-operation, equality, inclusion

active learning process

under-

standing

action

awareness

change policies

What is DE?

Arguments (4/21)

slide5

DE and other „educations“

DE is closely linked to other educations, with which it is often overlapping.

The overarching concept is Global Education.

Global refers to the content (one world issues) as well as to the methods (holistic pedagogy: participative, creative, personal..)

Global Education is also refered to as Global Learning, Education for Global Citizenship or others, depending on national and historical context.

The DEF uses a broad concept of DE, practically identical with Global Education.

Environmental

Education

Intercultural

Education

Peace

Education

Development

Education

Gender Education

Human rights

Education

Global

Education

What is DE?

Arguments (5/21)

slide6

Education or politics?

The diagram shows interconnections between DE and GE and different fields of formal and informal education.

Beyond its educational character, the final objective of DE is however strongly political: Change of attitudes and behaviours of citizens (including decision makers) and so finally change politics and societies, through a broad range of activities and action fields, from awareness raising over formal and non-formal learning processes to campaigning and political advocacy work.

In this sense, education as a tool to enable citizens’ engagement is necessarily political.

What is DE?

Arguments (6/21)

slide7

Why is it important?

The following slides provide 8 solid arguments on why development education should be supported.

Links provide further in-depth information on each argument.

The arguments should be selected and adapted according to the advocacy target (e.g. not the same arguments are convincing for the MFA development department and for a school curriculum authority).

Don‘t hesitate to contact DEEEP if you have questions on a specific point.

Arguments (7/21)

slide8

Eight good reasons for DE

  • DE is necessary, because DE is...
  • an answer to globalisation
  • challenging global injustice and poverty
  • challenging misinformation and stereotypes
  • providing qualification and skills
  • strengthening civil society
  • effective: DE works
  • a democraticrequirement
  • a political and legalobligation

Why is it important?

Arguments (8/21)

slide9

1. answer to globalisation

Lives of people are increasingly globallyconnected and shaped by what happens in other parts of the world.

Development Education provides necessary knowledge, understanding, skills and values to fully participate in ensuring own and others well-being and to make a positive contribution to globalisation, both locally and globally.

more on DE as an appropriate answer to globalisation:

Oxfam guide on „Education for global Citizenship“

http://www.oxfam.org.uk/education/gc/files/education_for_global_citizenship_a_guide_for_schools.pdf

Why is it important?

Arguments (9/21)

slide10

2. poverty reduction

„Take every penny you have aside in aid for Tanzania and spend it in the UK explaining to people facts and causes of poverty“

Julius Nyerere, former president of Tanzania.

The world we live in is unfair and unequal, and DE promotes the challenging and changing of this.

Reasons for poverty are complex: international trade and politics, postcolonial relations, gouvernance etc. DE promotes to get actively involved in changing policies in the North which harm the South, through awareness raising, education, campaigning and advocacy. For example, a campaign for fair trade or lobbying for debt release can be effective contributions to poverty reduction.

more on how DE contributes to poverty reduction:

Working to achieve the Millennium Development Goals through greater European public engagement in the fight against global poverty - CONCORD DEF position paper (2007)

http://www.deeep.org/fileadmin/user_upload/downloads/DE_Forum_reports/DEF_position_paper_Oct07.pdf

Why is it important?

Arguments (10/21)

slide11

3. fights misinformation

Misinformation and stereotypes are characteristic for the image of development cooperation and the „south“ in general. Questioning generalisations and critical thinking are key elements of DE.

Knowledge on non European countries and development issues remains very poor (e.g. 80% of the European never heard about the MDGs, spending for development aid is largely overestimated). However, a realistic picture of development challanges and the impact of European policies as well as individual behaviour is essential to constructively contribute to a better world. DE can provide this knowledge.

more on Europeans‘ attitudes towards development issues:

Special Eurobarometer „Europeans and Development Aid“, June 2007

http://ec.europa.eu/public_opinion/archives/ebs/ebs_280_en.pdf

ActionAid UK, Opinion Poll on Public Attitudes to Aid, 2006

http://www.actionaid.org.uk/doc_lib/poll_summary.pdf

DEA study: Young people’s Experiences of Global Learning

http://www.dea.org.uk/uploads/4453d22a64a184b4f76a113996448fcf/Ipsos_MORI.pdf

Why is it important?

Arguments (11/21)

slide12

4. skills and qualifications

Self-esteem, critical thinking, communication, co-operation, adaptability, team behaviour and global citizenship are essential qualities in the modern society. Active and particatory methods of DE engage the learner and help individuals to grow and develop their potentials.

Those competences are not only a precondition for reflected participation in society, but also largely appreciated skills on the labour market (which might lead to new alliances in the promotion of DE). However, in DE these skills are rooted in values as solidarity and inclusion. Some actors (like Oxfam or UNESCO) simply call this quality education.

more on this:

UNESCO‘s concept of „quality education“:

http://portal.unesco.org/education/en/ev.php-URL_ID=27542&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html

Skills in Oxfam‘s „Curriculum for Global Citizenship“:

http://eduwight.iow.gov.uk/curriculum/marks/images/Oxfam'sCurriculumforGlobalCitizenship.pdf

Why is it important?

Arguments (12/21)

slide13

5. strengthens civil society

The empowering and participatory appoarch of DE, encouraging individual and collective action, strengthens engagement of citizens. A strong civil society is however one precondition for coherent international cooperation policies.

Aware and active civil society is of particular importance in „emerging donor“ countries (NMS), which are about to define their international cooperation policies. Without the support of the public opinion, little likelyhood of strong ODA policies.

“If [citizens] were better educated and more informed regarding global development issues, they could provide informed, critical support to reformers in their countries, so as to foster more vigorous, more efficient and coherent development co–operation policies..”

OECD Development Centre, 2005

more on this:

OECD Development Centre Policy Insights Nr. 13 „MDGs, Taxpayers and Aid Effectiveness“

http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/50/42/35310784.pdf

Civil society project „EU policy coherence for Developement“

http://www.eucoherence.org/

Why is it important?

Arguments (13/21)

slide14

6. DE works!

DE has positive, documented and evaluated effects on society.

The OECD Development Centre sees a positive correlation between better awareness and higher expenditure on DE. Moreover, the 5 EU members who have invested most in DE are close to the 0.7% of GNI for ODA target, or have reached it already.

Also beyond the aim of “more and better aid”, DE proves to contribute to a better society, e.g. in terms of intercultural competences or environmental behaviour.

more DE

spending

more

awareness

better

ODA

more on this:

OECD publication “Public Opinion and the Fight against Poverty”

http://www.oecd.org/document/31/0,3343,en_2649_34101_2498143_1_1_1_1,00.html

OECD study on „MDGs, Taxpapers and Aid Effectiveness“

http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/50/42/35310784.pdf

RISC publication “How do we know it’s working?”

http://www.risc.org.uk/education/teaching_resources.html

There are plenty of positive examples of DE all over Europe. Contact DEEEP if you look for precise cases linked to your country or region.

Why is it important?

Arguments (14/21)

slide15

7. democratic requirement

It is a democraticright that the general public are adequately informed of development cooperation, so that they can hold their goverments to account to show that their taxes are being put to tackling poverty consistently and effectively, while also promoting social development.

Actions and evidence of impact should be communicated clearly to the public, and be made easily accessible through a range of media. Transparency and democratic control contribute to the quality of the development policy of a country. DE can contribute to that.

more on this:

CONCORD is doing an important work of ODA monitoring and documentation, which shows clearly that transparency and gouvernmental communication is insufficiant.

CONCORD Aid Watch

http://www.concordeurope.org/Public/Page.php?ID=258

CONCORD Aid effectiveness group

http://www.concordeurope.org/Public/Page.php?ID=8825

The link between democracy in donor countries and quality of development policies

http://www.die-gdi.de/CMS-Homepage/openwebcms3_e.nsf/(ynDK_contentByKey)/ADMR-7BRLEX?Open&nav=expand:Publications;active:Publications\ADMR-7BRLEX

Why is it important?

Arguments (15/21)

slide16

8. political obligation

In an ever growing number of political commitments and declarations, gouvernments and institutions recognised the importance of DE.

„The EU will pay particular attention to development education and awareness raising“

The European Consensus on Development, part 1, 4.3

selection of main European commitments:

2001 EU Council of Ministers Resolution on DE

2002 Maastricht Global Education Declaration

2005 Recommendations of the Brussels conference on DE

2005 to 2014 UN decade of Education for sustainable development

2005 European Consensus on development

2006 Recommendations of the Helsinki conference on DE

2007 European DE Consensus

2008 EP report on Development Cooperation Policies for the NMS

2008 Recommendations of the Ljubljana conference on DE

more on this (links to the texts and resources):

http://www.deeep.org/advocacy.html

„3% of aid funds could be earmarked for spending within donor nations [...] to increase public awareness of the interdependence of the North and the South“

UNDP Human Development Report 1993, p.8

Why is it important?

Arguments (16/21)

slide17

Who are the actors?

Knowing the DE actors in Europe is not only important to exchange on practises and to build up alliances. Their activities or mere existance can also support your argument: If a recognised international actor (as the European Commission) or a neigbouring country take DE seriously, a national gouvernment might be convinced easier.

The following three slides provide an overview on DE actors in Europe, on the existance of national DE strategies and on funding for DE.

Arguments (17/21)

slide18

UN Millenium campaign

UNESCO

DE Actors mapping

(selection)

NGOs / civil society

governmental / institutions

Council

of Europe

CONCORD

North-South Centre

GCAP &

other campaigns

European

Youth

Forum

European

DE multi

stakeholder

steering group

international

European

DEF

European

Commission

OECD DevCom

CEMR

European networks

(Oxfam, Plan,

GLEN etc.)

GENE

European

Parliament

media

nat. MFAs

nat.

platforms

trade unions

nat. MoEs

nat. development

agencies (InWEnt etc.)

media

national

nat. ngos

foundations

local

authorities

churches

local ngos

universities

DE Centres

private

schools

media

fair trade

shops

libraries

schools

...

local

Who are the actors?

Arguments (18/21)

slide19

National DE strategies

existing national DE strategy

Spain, France, England, Northern Ireland, Wales, Ireland, Austria, Greece

no national DE strategy

Portugal, Italy, Netherlands, Denmark, Sweden, Estonia, Lithuania, Bulgaria, Slovenia, Slovakia, Malta, Cyprus

in process or party existing

Scotland, Finland, Latvia, Poland, Germany, Czech Republic, Luxembourg, Belgium, Hungary, Romania

A quality DE strategy in another (e.g. neighbouring) country can be a good argument to use with your own gouvernment („if they have it, and it works, why shouldn‘t we?“).

more on this:

National examples (Poland, Spain) in part 3 of this toolkit

DEEEP biannual survey on DE

http://www.deeep.org/snapshotdememberstates.html

contact the national DEF representant or advocacy@deeep.orgfor more details on specific countries

Who are the actors?

Arguments (19/21)

slide20

National DE spending

DE spending in Mio €

(2004)

DE spending p.c. in €

(2004)

NL

D

GB

DK

A

E

IRL

F

SF

NL

D

L

GB

DK

A

E

more numbers:

check the DEEEP website

http://www.deeep.org

or contact advocacy@deeep.org

IRL

F

SF

source: OECD

http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/50/42/35310784.pdf

L

Who are the actors?

Arguments (20/21)

slide21

Advocacy Toolkit

v.10-2008

Thank you for using the DEEEP Advocacy Toolkit

For any questions, feedback or remarks, please write an email to

advocacy@deeep.org

Also check out the rest! The toolkit comes in three parts:

1 Arguments

What is DE? Why is it important? Who are the actors?

2 Methods

Principles of and approaches to successful lobbying

3 Examples

Who did it well? Spotlights on Spain, Poland

and the European multi stakeholder process on DE