People’s Food Co-op Established 1973 – Incorporated 1978 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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People’s Food Co-op Established 1973 – Incorporated 1978

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People’s Food Co-op Established 1973 – Incorporated 1978

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  1. People’s Food Co-op Established 1973 – Incorporated 1978

  2. People’s Food Co-op 2011 Sales: $11.5 million Local food sold (150 miles): $2.4 million Fresh produce is 22% of sales (typical supermarket 10% or less) Current membership: 4300 Staff: 125 full and part time Wages put into the local economy: $2.7 million Property taxes paid to the City of La Crosse: $86,500 (2010) City of La Crosse Statistics Population: 50,266 Average household income: $37,476 % of residents living in poverty: 25.2% % of population with Bachelor’s degree or higher: 24.1% Daytime population change (commuters): 19,395

  3. Food Co-ops are particularly well-equipped and well-suited to: • Assist in downtown revitalization • Generate sustainable employment • Provide a year-round outlet for local foods • Build social capital and connect community members to one another • Keep profits local

  4. Food Co-ops play an important role in supporting small food producers: • Providing a RELIABLE outlet for the products • Education around appropriate wholesale business practices • Connecting producers to consumers • Farm specific marketing through the food co-op to its membership • Provide an outlet for value-added products • Provide short-term financing in some cases

  5. Food Co-ops can be tapped for more than what we’re being asked for currently: • Offer a strong dose of “realism” around business plans • “retailing” versus “wholesaling” • market demand • finding markets for second grade products • connecting farmers to one another to inform local market approach • Ensure producers are realistically assessing all of the costs of their business plan

  6. Food co-ops don’t stop at retailing – mission related efforts and enterprises • Kitchen incubators • Private label products • Community gardens • Experimental farms and orchards • Educational programming • Issues advocacy and member mobilization

  7. Cities can play an important partnership role in the development and establishment of food co-ops • Access to gap funding through SBDC and other low interest loan programs • Access to TIF financing • Reduced cost access to city-owned properties as development sites (for both retail and crucial parking requirements) • Learn about cooperatives and act as advocates with local lenders and opinion leaders