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GCSE MUSIC REVISION 2010. Learning outcomes…. To know the different areas of study for the GCSE Music listening exam. To understand how to prepare well for the exam. To evaluate what you need to do to succeed in the exams. GCSE Music – Areas of Study. Music for Film Music for Dance

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learning outcomes
Learning outcomes…
  • To know the different areas of study for the GCSE Music listening exam.
  • To understand how to prepare well for the exam.
  • To evaluate what you need to do to succeed in the exams.
gcse music areas of study
GCSE Music – Areas of Study
  • Music for Film
  • Music for Dance
  • Orchestral Landmarks
  • Music for Special Events
  • Popular Song Since 1960
types of film cgp guide pgs 9 11
Types of FilmCGP Guide Pgs 9-11
  • The Western
  • Classic Monster/Horror and Science Fiction/Fantasy
  • Thrillers and Spy Films
the elements of film music
The Elements of Film Music
  • Syncopation
  • Cross rhythms
  • Homorhythmic/Polyrhythmic

The pattern of beats/duration

of notes.

The tune.

  • Conjunct/Disjunct
  • Major/Minor
  • Pentatonic
  • Modal
  • Atonal
  • Bitonal

The key of the music.

This gives the piece it’s mood.

  • Monophonic
  • Polyphonic/Contrapuntal
  • Homophonic

Thick or Thin.

  • See dynamics table below.
  • Terraced dynamics
  • Silence

The loudness and softness

of the music.

The speed of the music.

  • See tempo table below for terms.
  • Instruments

What kind of sound.

High or Low.

slide8

Compositional Devices

Motif:A short melodic or rhythmic idea that is sufficiently

distinctive to allow it to be modified, manipulated and possibly

combined with other motifs while retaining its own identity.

Batman – 5 Note Theme

slide9

Leitmotif:A memorable fragment or musical idea that

Represents an emotion, place, idea, object or person.

E.g. Jaws Theme, Darth Vader theme, Indiana Jones etc. etc.

Sequence: The immediate repetition of a motif or phrase of

a melody in the same part but at a different pitch.

slide10

Imitation: When a melodic idea stated by one part is copied

by another part whilst the melody line of the first part

continues. Only the opening notes of the original melody need

be repeated for this effect to be heard.

slide11

Ostinato: A rhythmic, melodic or harmonic pattern played

many times in succession.

Boogie Woogie Ostinato

slide12

Pedal Note: A sustained or repeated note sounded

against changing harmony.

Example:

gcse music areas of study13
GCSE Music – Areas of Study
  • Music for Film
  • Music for Dance
  • Orchestral Landmarks
  • Music for Special Events
  • Popular Song Since 1960
other type of dance the club scene
Other type of Dance:The Club Scene
  • Disco
  • Rap
  • Hip Hop
  • Techno
  • Jungle
  • Drum ‘n’ bass
  • UK Garage
  • Trance
  • Ambient

All are on sheet provided and

in CGP Guide Pg. 19.

music technology terms
Music Technology Terms
  • You need to know and learn these terms:
  • Mixing
  • Scratching
  • Sampling
  • Looping
  • Digital Effects – Vocoder, Reverb, Echo
  • Quantising
  • Sequencing
  • Multitracking
  • Remixing - Examples: Punjabi MC – Billy Jean, Knight Rider Bhangra, Eminem vs Punjabi.
  • MIDI

See Page 19 of CGP Guide for Music Technology Terms.

gcse music areas of study20
GCSE Music – Areas of Study
  • Music for Film
  • Music for Dance
  • Orchestral Landmarks
  • Music for Special Events
  • Popular Song Since 1960
the classical period 1750 1800
The Classical Period1750 - 1800
  • Composers are Haydn and Mozart.
  • Symphonies and Concertos are popular classical forms.
symphony
Symphony
  • A large scale piece of music for orchestra
  • consisting of 4 movements.

Concerto

  • A work for solo instrument accompanied by orchestra usually in 3 movements.
the classical period 1750 180024
The Classical Period1750 - 1800
  • Small-ish orchestra. Strings dominate sound.

Violins play most of the tunes.

  • Woodwind and brass support the strings.
  • Very structured, balanced phrase lengths

with cadences.

  • Clear tonality – Major/Minor
  • Texture is mostly homphonic.
  • Diatonic - Simple, straightforward harmonies.
  • Clear rhythms, constant tempo and metre.
  • Light and elegant.
the late classical period 1800 1830
The Late Classical Period1800 - 1830
  • Beethoven
  • Instruments added to orchestra – larger sections. Adds more woodwind in particular.

Also added trombones and some percussion (cymbals, bass drum and triangle).

  • Persistent rhythms sometimes used to

drive the music forward.

  • Powerful themes full of tension and drama.
  • Variations in dynamics.
the romantic period 1830 1900
The Romantic Period 1830 - 1900
  • Composers are: Schubert, Tchaikovsky, Wagner and Liszt amongst others.
  • Emotional and dramatic.
  • Used tone colours to create varied moods and emotions.
  • Bigger orchestra – New instruments added – Piccolo, Contrabassoon, Bass Clarinet, Cor Anglais, Tuba and Harp.
  • More use of percussion – Tubular Bells
  • Long melodies.
  • Melody passed around different instruments/sections – advances in instruments.
  • Chromatic notes.
  • Frequent modulations.
  • Uses a large range of dynamics.
  • Expression markings.
  • Changes in texture and tempo.
the 20 th century period 1900 2000
The 20th Century Period1900-2000
  • Composers are: Britten, Stravinsky, Schoenberg
  • Large orchestra. All sections are of equal importance.
  • Exploration of timbre - Composers

experimented with instruments/sounds in

new ways – see page 34 of CGP guide.

  • Use of electronic instruments/ non-instruments
  • Wide range of dynamics.
  • Lack of tonality or changing tonality

– Dissonance and Atonality

  • Lack of clear structure.
  • Fragmented/disjunct melodies.
  • Rhythm and metre changes – syncopation, polyrhythms, ostinati.
  • Huge contrasts in texture.
impressionism
Impressionism
  • The music is used to create the impression of a scene/title or picture
  • Dreamy, mystical floaty sounding music.
  • Uses whole tone scales and chords with added notes – 7ths, 9ths and even 13ths.
  • Debussy – L’apres midi d’un faune.
serialism or 12 note music
Serialism or 12 note music
  • Treats all 12 semitone pitches as equal.

Therefore the music is not based in a particular key or scale

  • The composer creates a tone row using all 12 pitches in a chosen order – each pitch is used once only.
  • This row is then used as the basis for the piece.
  • Schoenberg – Variations for orchestra Op. 31.
  • http://video.google.co.uk/videosearch?q=schoenberg+variations+for+orchestra+op+31&hl=en&emb=0&aq=f#
  • http://video.google.co.uk/videosearch?q=serialism+schoenberg&www_google_domain=www.google.co.uk&hl=en&emb=0&aq=0&oq=serialism#
  • Particular techniques include
      • Note clusters
      • Inversions (upside down)
      • Retrograde (backwards)
      • Retrograde inversion (the backwards version

upside down)

aleatoric music chance music
Aleatoric music (Chance Music)
  • The final decision about what is to be played is made at the performance so the piece sounds different each time it is performed.
  • John Cage – Music of Changes.
  • http://video.google.co.uk/videosearch?q=john+cage+music+of+changes&hl=en&emb=0&aq=-1&oq=john+cage+music+of+change#
jazz influenced
Jazz Influenced
  • Lively rhythms – syncopation
  • Blues notes
  • Brass – often muted
  • Gershwin – Rhapsody in Blue or American in Paris.
minimalism
Minimalism
  • Less is More - The idea is to create music from as little as possible
  • http://video.google.co.uk/videosearch?q=steve+reich+trains&hl=en&emb=0&aq=f#
gcse music areas of study34
GCSE Music – Areas of Study
  • Music for Film
  • Music for Dance
  • Orchestral Landmarks
  • Music for Special Events
  • Popular Song Since 1960
slide35

AOS – Music for Special Event

For Music for Special Events you need to make sure you are familiar with the following. Look them up and listen to examples on the AQA CD listening material which you all have on your drives.

plenary
Plenary
  • Complete the following statement adding as many details as possible.

I can revise most effectively for my Music listening exam by…

to do
To do:
  • Complete Music for Special Events Table if you have not already completed it.
  • Revise using books, links and revision materials provided.
  • Complete definition list (as provided by Miss Longbottom). Look them up in your revision guides. If you are stuck then ask next lesson.
  • Check out links on Miss Longbottom’s blog.
  • Use Sibelius instruments to listen to different instruments and familiarise yourself with their sounds..
learning outcomes39
Learning outcomes…
  • To know the different areas of study for the GCSE Music listening exam.
  • To understand how to prepare well for the exam.
  • To evaluate what you need to do to succeed in the exams.