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Team assignments in CS 322 “Data Structures & Algorithms II”. Jey Veerasamy CIS Adjunct Faculty Baker College Online. CS 321 & CS 322 contents. CS 321 focuses on data structures: arrays, linked lists, vectors, stacks and queues, then a little about recursion algorithms.

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team assignments in cs 322 data structures algorithms ii

Team assignments inCS 322 “Data Structures & Algorithms II”

Jey VeerasamyCIS Adjunct Faculty

Baker College Online

cs 321 cs 322 contents
CS 321 & CS 322 contents
  • CS 321 focuses on data structures: arrays, linked lists, vectors, stacks and queues, then a little about recursion algorithms.
  • CS 322 covers advanced data structures like hash tables, binary trees, AVL trees, and graphs, but the focus is more on algorithms: divide-and-conquer, greedy & dynamic programming approaches to solve various problems.
cs 322 team assignments
CS 322 Team Assignments
  • Goals:
    • Make students analyze the problems (a.k.a. critical thinking)
    • Bring ideas to solve them based on those three approaches to the table
    • Validate each other’s ideas
    • Settle on the “right” data structures & arrive at the detailed pseudocode
what problems
What problems?
  • I use classic problems like Knapsack problem, company party problem, activity scheduling problem, Huffman coding algorithm.
  • Typically these algorithms are taught in graduate courses. So, I try my best to provide “just enough” help to start meaningfully and progress meaningfully.

S1

P

S2

S3

when how
When & How?
  • Spans 2 weeks: High level approach in Week 4 and low level pseudocode in Week 5.
  • I assign 2 to 3 designers & 2 to 3 reviewers for each problem.
  • All discussions done in Weekly discussion forums, NOT in group forums.
student s roles
Student’s roles
  • Each student is a designer for one problem (40 points) and also a reviewer for another problem (20 points). I reverse the roles in Week 5 for each problem.

Week 4

Week 5

P1

P1

Design

Review

S

S

Review

Design

P2

P2

week 4 process
Week 4 Process
  • Start of Week 4: designers find the optimal solution for sample input manually and reviewers test it out.
  • Week 4: designers come up with a few workable ideas, reviewers comment on them.
  • End of Week 4: Try to zero in on one approach & verify it for a few sample inputs manually.
week 5 process
Week 5 process
  • Start Week 5 with solid understanding of high level approach.
  • Bring in the right data structures & details
  • Verify its validity again by testing with a sample inputs.
what is good
What is good
  • Students enjoy the experience. When one student hits the wall, another student brings up an idea, that keeps the team moving.
  • Students learn to work with other’s “incomplete” ideas, practice their skills to give “constructive criticisms”.
need to work on
Need to work on
  • Sometimes students become impatient and find the solution using “web search”  even though I stress on the “thinking process”, NOT the “end-result”.
  • I try to ensure there is at least one “leader” in each team. But, there are times I end up with no leaders in the team  No one starts the discussion!
  • Some students refuse to post their ideas since they are not sure those ideas will work 