Endocarditis pericarditis
Download
1 / 26

Endocarditis Pericarditis - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 148 Views
  • Uploaded on

Endocarditis Pericarditis. EKG Changes indicative of Disease Processes other than STEMI. Bundle of His. Janeway lesions are seen in people with acute bacterial endocarditis. They appear as flat, painless, red to bluish-red spots on the palms and soles.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Endocarditis Pericarditis' - brede


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Endocarditis pericarditis

Endocarditis Pericarditis

EKG Changes indicative of Disease Processes other than STEMI



Janeway lesions are seen in people with acute bacterial

endocarditis. They appear as flat, painless, red to bluish-red

spots on the palms and soles.



Sinus tachycardia streaks in nail).  

PR depression

ST elevation


ST-T Wave Changes in Myocarditis streaks in nail).  


Common Causes of Infectious Pericarditis streaks in nail).  

Bacteria

Haemophilus influenzae

Mycobacterium

Neisseria gonorrhoeae

Neisseria meningitidis

Salmonella

Staphylococcus aureus

Streptococcus pneumoniae

Virus

Coxsackievirus A and B

Echovirus

Epstein-Barr virus

HIV

Influenza virus

Paramyxovirus

Parvovirus B19

Fungi

Aspergillus

Blastomyces

Candida

Coccidioides immitis

Cryptococcus neoformans

Histoplasma capsulatum


PR depression is seen in the early phase of streaks in nail).  

pericarditis and is followed by changes such as:

ST segment elevation

Normalization of the ST segment

T-wave inversion

Normalization of all changes over several days to

weeks

Low-voltage complexes are seen in pericarditis

with pericardial effusion.


Mitral Valve Vegetation streaks in nail).  


TAKE HOME POINTS streaks in nail).  


In patients diagnosed with an infectious disease, streaks in nail).  

electrocardiography can be used to evaluate for

cardiac involvement, provide information on prognosis,

and assess the effect of treatment.

Abnormalities on the electrocardiogram (ECG) of

a febrile patient in whom late-stage Lyme disease is

suspected can point to the diagnosis; conduction

and rhythm disturbances are the most common

ECG findings.

In a patient with known endocarditis and persistent

fever despite appropriate therapy, heart block on

repeated ECG may indicate the presence of complicated

valve abscess.


Myocarditis is caused by many infectious agents streaks in nail).  

and may produce a number of ECG abnormalities:

Adams-Stokes syndrome, conduction disturbances,

pseudoinfarction pattern, ST-segment and T-wave

abnormalities, and premature ventricular contractions.

Physicians should know the QTc interval in a patient

to be treated with a quinolone or macrolide

as these agents have proarrhythmic effects.


Lyme carditis is becoming a more frequent complication of Lyme disease, primarily due to the increasing incidence of this disease in the United States. Cardiovascular manifestations of Lyme disease often occur within 21 days of exposure and include fluctuating degrees of AV block, acute pericarditis or mild left ventricular dysfunction and rarely cardiomegaly or fatal pericarditis. AV block can vary from first-, second-, third-degree heart block, to junctional rhythm and asystolic pauses. Patients with suspected or known Lyme disease presenting with cardiac symptoms, or patients in an endemic area presenting with cardiac symptoms with no other cardiac risk factors should have a screening electrocardiogram along with Lyme titers. We present a case of third-degree AV block due to Lyme carditis, illustrating one of the cardiac complications of Lyme disease. This disease is usually self-limiting when treated appropriately with antibiotics, and does not require permanent cardiac pacing.


Adams- Stokes Syndrome Lyme disease, primarily due to the increasing incidence of this disease in the United States. Cardiovascular manifestations of Lyme disease often occur within 21 days of exposure and include fluctuating degrees of AV block, acute pericarditis or mild left ventricular dysfunction and rarely cardiomegaly or fatal pericarditis. AV block can vary from first-, second-, third-degree heart block, to junctional rhythm and asystolic pauses. Patients with suspected or known Lyme disease presenting with cardiac symptoms, or patients in an endemic area presenting with cardiac symptoms with no other cardiac risk factors should have a screening electrocardiogram along with Lyme titers. We present a case of third-degree AV block due to Lyme carditis, illustrating one of the cardiac complications of Lyme disease. This disease is usually self-limiting when treated appropriately with antibiotics, and does not require permanent cardiac pacing.

The preferred name is cardiovascular

syncope caused by heart block.

It is marked by a sudden collapse into

unconsciousness caused by a slow or

absent pulse resulting in fainting with or

without convulsions.


An inside View of Infective Endocarditis Lyme disease, primarily due to the increasing incidence of this disease in the United States. Cardiovascular manifestations of Lyme disease often occur within 21 days of exposure and include fluctuating degrees of AV block, acute pericarditis or mild left ventricular dysfunction and rarely cardiomegaly or fatal pericarditis. AV block can vary from first-, second-, third-degree heart block, to junctional rhythm and asystolic pauses. Patients with suspected or known Lyme disease presenting with cardiac symptoms, or patients in an endemic area presenting with cardiac symptoms with no other cardiac risk factors should have a screening electrocardiogram along with Lyme titers. We present a case of third-degree AV block due to Lyme carditis, illustrating one of the cardiac complications of Lyme disease. This disease is usually self-limiting when treated appropriately with antibiotics, and does not require permanent cardiac pacing.

This cross-section shows vegetations (blood clots & bacteria) on

the four heart valves.







Prinzmetal’s angina, also known as variant angina, is a syndrome typically consisting of angina (cardiac chest pain) at rest that occurs in cycles. It is caused by vasospasm, a narrowing of the coronary arteries caused by contraction of the smooth muscle tissue in the vessel walls rather than directly by atherosclerosis (buildup of fatty plaque and hardening of the arteries). It was first described in 1959 by the American cardiologist Dr. Myron Prinzmetal (1908-1987).


EKG Changes indicative of COPD syndrome typically consisting of angina (cardiac chest pain) at rest that occurs in cycles. It is caused by vasospasm, a narrowing of the coronary arteries caused by contraction of the smooth muscle tissue in the vessel walls rather than directly by atherosclerosis (buildup of fatty plaque and hardening of the arteries). It was first described in 1959 by the American cardiologist Dr. Myron Prinzmetal (1908-1987).


Acute pericarditis classically shows widespread, concave-upward ST-segment elevation with PR-segment depression and PR-segment elevation in lead aVR. The ECG abnormalities may evolve through 4 phases:

Stage I: diffuse ST-segment elevation and PR-segment depression (60-80% of cases);

Stage II: normalization of the ST and PR segments, with flattening of the T wave;

Stage III: widespread T-wave inversions; and

Stage IV: normalization of the T waves.

The prompt institution of therapy may prevent the appearance of all 4 stages.


ad