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Writing Meaningful Learning Objectives. Suzanna J. Ramos sramos@tamhsc.edu. Teaching Learning Resource Center. Director of UCLA Lab (Elementary Schools) ‘Director’. Kindergarten Teacher ‘Teacher’.

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Writing Meaningful Learning Objectives


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    1. Writing Meaningful Learning Objectives Suzanna J. Ramos sramos@tamhsc.edu Teaching Learning Resource Center

    2. Director of UCLA Lab (Elementary Schools) ‘Director’ Kindergarten Teacher ‘Teacher’

    3. So, what’s going on with all those photocopied turkey cut outs and colored tissue paper? There’s quite a mess here!

    4. Well, it was an art experience for the kids.

    5. So, why go through photocopying the turkeys? Why not just give them paper and tissue and let them be creative, you know, express themselves?

    6. It wasn’t really that. It was really a lesson in eye-hand coordination.

    7. Well, then why didn’t you have them outline the turkey? You can’t tell whether they stayed within the line or not when they’ve got them pasted all over the turkey.

    8. Well, it wasn’t really that. It was a lesson in conservation.

    9. Conservation?

    10. Yes, the kids have really been wasteful of paste. So, I was trying to teach them to put just a tiny piece of paste on.

    11. Then why didn’t you give them a piece of paste, or paper of paste, and see how much of the turkey they could finish before they ran out of paste?

    12. Oh, for cryin’ out loud, can’t kids just have fun?

    13. Sure they can have fun. What do your kids like to do?

    14. The thing they like to do best is just chase out on the school grounds.

    15. Why didn’t you take the last half-hour and go around supervise them while they chased, and you wouldn’t have this mess to clean up!

    16. ???

    17. Objectives • To distinguish the various types of lesson objectives • To learn to write meaningful objectives pertinent to the lesson

    18. Why Learning Objectives? • They tell students what is important • Serve as basis for teaching procedure • Enable effective assessment development

    19. Objectives and Goals Objective Goal

    20. Objectives and Goals Use objectives to make sure you reach your goals

    21. Goals and Objectives Used with kind permission from the Clinical Learning Resource Center (HSC)

    22. Course goals Course objectives Lesson objectives

    23. I want my students to be able to:

    24. I want my students to be able to: How do we know?

    25. I want my students to be able to: How do we know? …because they can

    26. I want my students to be able to: How do we know? …because they can

    27. Kinds of Thinking for Lesson Planning • Coverage thinking • Activity thinking • Involvement thinking • Mastery objectives thinking

    28. Coverage Thinking • Planning what content or skill is to be addressed or ‘covered’ in the lesson • Instructor is going to present, describe, explain, demonstrate or cover identified information • Instructor may not necessarily be guided by what is in the students’ heads.

    29. Activity Thinking • Activities the instructor wants students to do • Focus now shifts from what the instructor will do to how students will participate in the lesson • Instructor might be more concerned with what students are doing rather than what they are learning

    30. Involvement Thinking • Getting all the students engaged in the learning experience • Students work alone, in pairs or in groups • However, student engagement is insufficient for learning as activities need to be carefully designed to lead to desired learning

    31. Mastery Objectives Thinking • Instructor asks what exactly they want students to know and be able to do when the lesson is over. • The instructor also asks how he/she knows that students have learnt it and what to take as evidence the objective has been met.

    32. Quiz Time!

    33. Quiz Time! • I want my students to build the model and then discuss as a group what obstacles they faced. Activity thinking

    34. Quiz Time! 2. I want my students to understand Topic X, Chapter 5 as I go through the lecture. Coverage thinking

    35. Quiz Time! 3. I want my students to be able to identify 5 types of X and I will know if they are able to if they do Y. Mastery objectives thinking

    36. Quiz Time! 4. I want my students to work in pairs as they conduct the experiment. Involvement thinking

    37. Kinds of Thinking for Lesson Planning • Coverage thinking • Activity thinking • Involvement thinking • Mastery objectives thinking

    38. Kinds of Thinking for Lesson Planning • Coverage thinking • Activity thinking • Involvement thinking • Mastery objectives thinking

    39. Mastery Objectives • Linked to curricular standards • Matched to the students • Able to be assessed • Avoid using mental action words that do not inform students about what they will have to do to demonstrate mastery

    40. Bloom’s Taxonomy (1956) Source: Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: The Classification of Educational Goals: Handbook 1, Cognitive Domain, by B.S. Bloom, 1956

    41. Bloom’s Taxonomy Source: A Taxonomy of Teaching & Assessing, by L. Anderson & D. Krathwohl, 2001

    42. Sample verbs from Bloom’s Taxonomy Adapted from: How learning works: Seven research-based principles for smart teaching, by S.A. Ambrose, et al., 2010.

    43. Approaches on writing learning objectives

    44. Using the WHW approach

    45. Using the WHW approach

    46. Using the WHW approach

    47. Using the WHW approach

    48. Using the WHW approach

    49. Using the WHW approach