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One Way to Create New Jobs in the Television Broadcasting Industry Marshaye Meyers, Department of Radio, Television, and Film, College of Arts and Sciences and Honors College Faculty Mentor: John Sparks, Department of News, Mayborn School of Journalism. BACKGROUND. ABSTRACT.

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One Way to Create New Jobs in the Television Broadcasting Industry

Marshaye Meyers, Department of Radio, Television, and Film,

College of Arts and Sciences and Honors College

Faculty Mentor: John Sparks, Department of News, Mayborn School of Journalism

BACKGROUND

ABSTRACT

METHODOLOGY

Today’s society is extremely information driven. What stocks should I invest in? Where is the best place to live? Who are the celebrities dating? One survey released by the Pew Research Center shows that 78% of adults queried get their news from local television news stations (McAdams, 2010). On-air talent and behind-the-scenes technicians are responsible for delivering television news daily. However, the availability of jobs in the broadcasting industry is declining due to usage of the Internet as a top news source. New jobs must be created to continue the quality and quantity of newscasts at current television stations. The easiest way to create jobs in the broadcast news industry is to split the duties and salaries of existing jobs.

I propose that careful manipulation of any news station’s annual production budget would allot the creation of a newly standardized job. Since technological advancements are replacing jobs in the studio camera operating realm, I plan to create a job that caters to studio camera workers.

The first televised news programs began about 60 years ago. National networks produced brief segments that gradually expanded to longer formats involving the networks' local affiliates. The growth of cable television generated 24-hour news stations. Today we have around-the-clock weather, sports, and business shows (Csorney, 2009).

LITERATURE REVIEW

  • Current broadcasting jobs fall under one of four categories:
    • Producers
    • News analysts, reporters, and correspondents
    • Camera operators
    • Film and video editors (Csorney, 2009)
  • Job duties within a specific occupation vary by the size of the news station. Large stations operate with larger budgets, which allow for more skill specific jobs. Workers at smaller stations tend to have little specialization of job function due to smaller production budgets (Csorney, 2009).
  • In the broadcasting industry, the least specialized jobs are the first to be cut when the annual production budget gets smaller. That’s why it is so important to advertise job available in this industry. Employees who cannot find broadcasting jobs end up leaving the industry altogether.
  • In 2003, a small news station in Vermont, WVNY, closed down because it was not receiving sufficient operational funding. Instead of leaving the broadcasting industry for one more stable, the news director, Peter Speciale, contacted every broadcasting group and job board he knew to get his former employees re-employed (Rosen, 2004).
  • Speciale posted everyone’s resume on the station’s website, allowed employees to use job-hunting resources in the newsroom, and provided severance for former-tenured employees (Rosen, 2004).
  • Speciale got over 100 e-mails back with job opportunities for his employees. He logged those jobs in a database and sent them out until everyone secured another job (Rosen, 2004).
  • In conclusion, developing technology has become a double-edged sword in the broadcasting industry. While the efficiency of news production has greatly increased, technology is beginning to take the place of human employees. Tom Weir, an associate professor at the University of South Carolina's School of Journalism and Mass Communications, says, "The technology we will see in 5 years doesn't exist yet, at least not in a commercially viable form." The jobseekers whose diverse talents are adaptable to these developing technologies are likely to be the best prospective employees (Csorney, 2009). However, creating a standardized job would help employees stand the test of new technology.

Picture of an early studio television camera.

Picture of a modern studio television camera

CURRENT JOBS

ACKNOWLEGEMENTS

  • Executive Producer -- in charge of managing staff and making major programming and financial decisions
  • Line Producer -- works with the production team to keep the show on schedule and within budget
  • Associate Producers -- assist the executive producer in everything from writing news stories to prioritizing news items in a broadcast
  • News Analysts (News Anchors) -- have the authority to rewrite news stories they report and conduct interviews. Some news anchors must have a background in a specialized field like meteorology and sports.
  • Reporters -- shoot news segments in the field and submit these segments to the station to be aired
  • Correspondents – reporters sent out with a news team to places outside of the station’s broadcasting zone
  • Studio Camera Operators -- have limited jobs due to the advancement of technology. However, smaller stations have several operators assigned to different cameras.
  • News Camera Operators -- work outside the studio and are responsible for camera set-up and maintenance
  • Film and Video Editors -- the last people to see a segment before it airs; editors put together the best shots from each take and make the reporter and interview subject appear as the producer intended. May work in the studio or field with the reporter (Csorney, 2009)

Wendy K. Wilkins, Ph.D., Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

Gloria C. Cox, Ph.D., Dean, Honors College

Susan Brown Eve, Ph.D., Associate Dean, Honors College

John Sparks, Ph.D. News Department, Mayborn School of Journalism

REFERENCES

Csorny, Lauren. "Making the news: Jobs in TV journalism." Occupational Outlook Quarterly 53.1 (2009): 2-13. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 16 Feb. 2010.

Jill Rosen.  "Old Story, New Twist. " American Journalism Review  1 Dec. 2003: Research Library, ProQuest. Web.  16 Feb. 2010.

McAdams, Deborah D. “Americans Prefer Local TV as Top News Source” Television Broadcast. March 1, 2010. March 21, 2010 <http://www.televisionbroadcast.com/article/95488>

PHOTO CREDITS:

[Photo of Early Studio Television Camera]. Retrieved March 21, 2010, from <http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/84/Historical_television_camera.jpeg/250px-Historical_television_camera.jpeg.>

[Photo of Modern Studio News Camera]. Retrieved March 21, 2010 from <http://www.uu.edu/programs/dms/images/studio-camera.jpg>

[Image of News Anchor. Retrieved March 21, 2010, from, <http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/clipart/results.aspx?qu=anchorpeople&sc=20>

[Image of Reporter]. Retrieved March 21, 2010 from <http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/clipart/results.aspx?qu=reporter&sc=20>

[Image of Camera Operator]. Retrieved March 21, 2010 from <http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/clipart/results.aspx?qu=journalism&sc=20#12>

[Picture of Newsroom]. Retrieved March 21, 2010 from <http://www.fxgroup.tv/portfolio/portfolioimages/wcpo1_f.jpg>